Planetary Challenge - Fall 2015

There are no postings in your class

There are no posts from collaborative classes or you don't have access

Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
4 années 5 mois ago

I read your post because I was shocked when the Volkswagen thing happened, and I felt this was similar from the title. As I read your post, I saw that you were talking about taking responsibility from polluting the environment. I am shocked about the falsification, but can you blame them? I mean it is comparable to a trouble child, who messes up again. He doesn't want to be scolded and thus he lies. I completely agree that they should take reforms and work on their policies to make their industry a greener and safer environment. But, starting to blame is not the solution. Even if you know the kid is lying, it's either you punish him harder and then he'll be even more scared and lie more, or you help him through it.

4 années 5 mois ago

First I would like to compliment you on your title, very smart and catchy. By reading this post, I was filled with excitement. I love anything that has to deal with finding new energies to replace the current non-renewable polluting ones we use. Tidal energy is one that is not talked as much because of its need for coasts and we do not necessarily find that everywhere. As I was reading your post, I was having many questions, but you seemed to answer all of them at the end. It's great to hear that all this talk about how we should go into renewable energies is actually starting to take form.

4 années 5 mois ago

Very nice post ! I like how you brought the idea of water inequalities around the world. Most people would stick with the 6% renewable groundwater statistic, but bringing it back to the international scale really shows how there are areas that are "luckier" than others. Knowing the inequalities that exist - especially when it comes to water, the blue gold -, how do we as the human species deal with others? Should we just hole up in our own countries and refuse to help each other because of these imaginary lines we call borders? I think that it is our duty, even with our socioeconomic, political, and religious differences, to come to the aid of those in need, especially when a country like Canada having more than enough for itself.

4 années 5 mois ago

I decided to comment on your summary because I was interested in your way of describing climate change. Climate change is a phenomenon that has always been in effect. It has always been a factor that would impact the lives of human beings. However, it is true that, all the revolutions humans have gone through have been a major reason for its overwhelming increase and acceleration. It does come to mind to say, "we deserve this, it is our own undoing", but what is the purpose of putting blame now? We should focus on what we can do in regards to the situation as you said.

4 années 5 mois ago

I first decided to read your article because of your title, it intrigued me to see that Canadians were not too “worried” about the environment. I used to view them as the people who cared for anything and everything and I still do, but, this comes as shocking news. I honestly would like to dismiss these statistics, because as a Canadian I feel they do not represent my view on the topic. More than that, I feel these stats to be alarming. To make any changes in regards to the environment, we require a collective international effort. Which is the purpose of the summit in Paris. However, when we look at Canada, a developed country involved internationally, barely having half the population believing this is a serious issue; I think this makes the future look a bit grim. Nevertheless, there is hope. With the summit ending on a positive note, I think more awareness will be spread and people will hopefully change their minds and actions for a more eco-friendly life.

4 années 5 mois ago

I agree it's baffling that after the historic cod collapse in Newfoundland, and the massive rancid tuna scandal, that Canada on no level of government can seem to get it right. Canada has always had a semi-true semi-false perception of a environmental leader, but we are proving that within water management and the fishing industry, two large topics heavily related to environmental matters, Canada needs to become better at managing their resources and ecological foundations.

Reply to: urban sprawl
4 années 5 mois ago

Urban sprawl at such a large magnitude as predicted is a major concern to the governments and people of the world. The question of how much consumption and accommodations to feed these predicted mega cities is often an overlooked topic when debating overpopulation. We simply will not have enough. If 70% of the world's population is suppose to live in cities by 2050, and most current population predictions peg population to be around 9-10 billion, then that will mean roughly 6-7 billion people will be predicted to live in cities. That seems like a crazy amount and that the world will need to do crazy amounts of accommodating to have all of these people live and function in massive metropolis'. If we do not act quickly to properly address this situation I fear multiple thresholds in various environmental faucets will be broken.

4 années 5 mois ago

very interesting and surprising article about the processes and amount of time these GMO fish took to be able to be considered "edible". At first I also shared the same sentiment about not only modified fish, but GMO's in general. But throughout learning in the environmental field my opinion has changed and I too now also agree with you that these types of GMO's all have certain situations where they will greatly benefit not only the people consuming them but the regions where the alternative regular item the GMO is replacing is harvested from (be it ocean, forest or field). These fish could definitely help take some tension off the already stressed and strained fish industry. I wonder how many ways modifying genetics could add better efficiency to resources we consume daily.

4 années 5 mois ago

After reading your post and glancing over the article, as well as recently finishing a paper on this same topic of the intensification of hurricanes via climate change and the warming of the ocean currents that enable them to become such catastrophic events, I definitely agree that this should be treated as a very serious matter, and should be receiving more attention in the areas that could be inflicted the most pain. Though there might not be more frequent instances of hurricanes, evidence is leading to an increase in more servere, larger storms. It will be interesting to see how each nations government deals with their affected coastlines, I hope it will be enough and that their evacuation systems are efficient enough to limit the loss of lives to as little as possible.

4 années 5 mois ago

Good article. I have to say that this is a very good idea! Especially knowing how diverse the biodiversity is in Australia, it is very nice to see that something is being done to protect it. These fines will surely result in endangered species having more time to replenish themselves and growing strong again. This should be happening in other countries to make sure that the most endangered species are being protected around the world. This is a great step towards a better world and it shows that putting fines has a great impact not only on protecting endangered species but also on reducing carbon emissions.

There no collaborative classes

About the author

Class Subject