JURI 1106B Law as a Social Science

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Reply to: Blog post ~ 1
3 années 11 mois ago

I would strongly agree with your point were people have to respect each other, also have to respect the law. You have motioned that drivers have more responsibility in Canada, which provide security for other people to walk safely, also you stated that people have respect to each other when they live close, so in the middle of the week no one can make noise after 10 PM, which shows people that they have to respect each other even in the place they own, such as a house, or apartment. In the second part, you mentioned the tax, which is known as the main source of revenue to the government. Tax gives the government the ability to improve a certain country when it been garneted and spend in the right track. As an example of that, you bring up the health care plan in Canada which is really helpful and been improved through the tax revenue, and there are many other thing in the country that benefit from tax

Reply to: blog post ~ 2
3 années 11 mois ago

First I like the way you connect the Anishnabe rule of nature to the Idea of obeying the law, and that people are obligated to follow the rule, another point that you have mentioned is that people would not want to pay for mistakes financially, I got two speeding ticket my self, and I hated the facts that I have to pay money for it, not only that when I got point deduction I had to pay more for car insurance, witch is another thing that I hated because now I am considered as risky driver. People reputation could be damaged when the committed an offence, which could reflect badly to society. For example, if an individual is committed as sex offender, at this point the society would look to that individual differently even if HE/SHE had served HIS/HER sentence. So that give us a better understanding of why we obey the law, and that most people try to stay out o troubles to avoid being punished.

3 années 11 mois ago

I enjoyed how you stated "[s]ocial sciences help us form a bridge between the corrections that our society needs". It is very important to look at law as a social science to ensure the law is working most efficiently with our society. Good job

3 années 11 mois ago

You made very good points and showed why it is important to study law as a social science. Offering different examples like the one about learning from past legal issues to prevent them in the future. Good job.

Reply to: Blog post 3
3 années 11 mois ago

Thank you Mohammed for this post.
I agree that each person treats equally the same in the country as you said because as I have read two years ago about the president of Toronto when he got caught smoking crack. The government treated him as any person in the country used that kind of drugs, and the government did not say that because he had a power in the country we should not catch him, so what we see is treating people in the same way make the government stronger and show the people that no one is above the law that sets by the government. Also, that gives the people in the country the right and has the confidence to complain about any person doing wrong things, and the government will do the right decision to treat the people who are breaking the law even if they are working with the government.

Reply to: Blog Post two
3 années 11 mois ago

I agree with Mohammed and his great example for drinking Alcohol because as a Saudi and I have studied the Sharia Law which is our country follows. Sharia Law says that each citizen in Saudi Arabia ( even Saudi or not, or Muslim or not ) must not drink alcohol in the country because it is prohibited in the country and it treats as a drug. Unlike in Canada, Alcohol is legal in Ontario, but you should follow some rules to drink or buy alcohol. First, your age should be nineteen years old or above. For example, if you got caught in Canada and you are under the legal age of drinking alcohol, you will be in a problem. Second, you are not able to drink alcohol while driving a vehicle because your brain does not have the full attention to control the vehicle even if you feel comfortable. For example, you went to the bar and you have finished 3 bottles of beer then you have decided to leave the bar and go back to your place ( even if you are not feeling drunk) if you got caught from the police your driver license will be substantial automatically because you have a percentage of alcohol in you blood more that five percent as a Full G driver. On the other hand, the government sets some laws for those placese where they are selling alcohol on it. First, in Ontraio there are only 3 places you can buy Alcohol from it ( as a bottle ) The LCBO, The Beer Store, The Wine Store. Those three places are selling Alcohol under some rules. One of them is the person who is buying Alcohol shouldn't be drunk while buying it from the store. Also, the sotre can not sell alcohol after 10 p.m as a maximum.

Reply to: Second of Blogs
3 années 11 mois ago

You have very interesting points and ideas that I think really reflect our society today. I think your point about our society becoming a dystopian society if laws are not enacted, enforced, or followed. Most people think that would never be possible in a society like Canada, but Canada relies heavily on laws to structure society, and if this social control suddenly is no longer relevant, the society will head downhill very quickly. Also, I agree with your point about there being universal laws everyone follows and can agree on collectively. However, there are cultural practice and social norms of different societies that lead to the creation of laws that might not be accepted as valid in another country or culture. For example, polygamy is not acceptable in many Western cultures and is banned by law, but other countries in the world see it as acceptable and normal, and so there are not any laws banning it. I really like your point about the law being our civic duty, and think that you could even add on that it could also be our civic duty to disobey the law. If the law no longer reflects morals, values, and beliefs of society, it is up to the individuals to make a point that the law should no longer be accepted.

Reply to: Blog Post #1
3 années 11 mois ago

I really like your initial point about how the law even affects the freshness of the air we breathe; I don’t always immediately think of environmental laws and regulations when I think of laws that affect me. Usually I think of traffic laws and copyright laws instead. I think it is really important to emphasize the part we play as individuals within society and how it affects others, like the example you gave about following the law and the safety of yourself and others. It is important to acknowledge the part we as individuals play in society, how we can contribute to the law, and the responsibility we have to uphold laws in order to keep others safe. Also, you pointed out that much of the law we follow (or at least the impact it has) is invisible, which is definitely true. I never would have thought of having clean water to make my coffee or breathing fresh air to be directly related to the law. Perhaps I just take it for granted, which is even more reason to study the law and understand how it is connected to everyday life. Very interesting points!

Reply to: Blog Post Three
3 années 11 mois ago

Well done article

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