Race and Racism Group 546 (Fall 2015)

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5 années 10 mois ago

I choose to comment on your submission because of the mysterious title, I think that the author and yourself make a fantastic point that the police treat racial minorities the way they do simply because they are reflecting societies attitudes towards crime. It had never occurred to me that society is partly at fault for the treatment of these innocent black men being killed. I completely agree with you when you say that we need to take a good long look in the mirror when we question why all of these social issues arise in our communities. Thinking on what you argue reminds me of new racism and even democratic racism because oftentimes people think they are such peaceful, equality loving people. However in reality, add to stereotypes and negative feelings towards minorities, without them or others realizing the racist undertone of their beliefs and comments. To conclude, like you said we should all look in the mirror to see if perhaps the person looking back is actually a part of the problem. If so, we need to realize the true meaning of racist and how to stop it at its roots, because we are the solution.

5 années 10 mois ago

The title of this post is what immediately grabbed my attention because it was so ambiguous so I was eager to read what it was about.While reading through it I learned a different point of view of asking the question “where are you from?”. In fact, after having a very heated discussion in class about whether it is right or wrong to ask this question I have formed my own views as well. I think that by asking this question it reinforces the divide and the existence of race in our culture. I say this because most of the time this type of question is directed to be people with visible traits that differ from the typical white american/european look. It is not often we will hear this question in regards to a white person even if maybe they are the foreigner and not the dark-skinned person or the asian person. Even though it is not an ill-intentioned question it still could have negative effects on a person who is constantly being asked. Although I do not have the same experiences because of my lighter skin, I can see how annoying and repetitive it can get by being with my friends. In fact, my friends who are asian were born here in Quebec and they are constantly being asked where they are from and though in essence it is not a mean question, it can make them feel as if it is impossible they are from here, especially when a person presses on to ask where their parents are from and so forth. It is especially apparent when people with lighter skin may only be asked once and then the subject is left alone. I am curious to know more about the opinions of people who are often asked this question though because I think it’s important for them to have their say.

5 années 10 mois ago

I decided to respond to your post, because racism in the police system is an issue that causes a lot of conflicts. While reading your summary, I was surprised to learn that police officers with black skin also have stereotypes about certain skin colors. However, I agree with you when you said that systematic racism is more powerful than personal stereotypes. On the other hand, it is important to not mix color of the skin and identity. As Audrey Smedley explained in her article "Race" and the Construction of Human Identity", the dominant society should not impose a "racial" identity on people from minorities. The color of your skin does not define who you are, and even less your behavior/actions. Moreover, I believe that a high police patrolling in certain areas is not necessarily linked to race; if data shows that there is a lot of criminal activities in an area, police officers need to supervise it. Finally, I agree with you that the best solution is to give equal chance of job opportunity to people from everywhere in order to perhaps reduce the quantity of crimes in certain areas. It is not through racial discrimination that we will make this world safer; it is with respect and humanity.

Reply to: Feminism & Me
5 années 10 mois ago

I decided to comment on this particular post because I have recently found myself interested in the topic of feminism and I wanted to see what your views on it were. However, after reading your post I was exceptionally happy because not only did we have similar views but I was able to connect this post to what the material I'm covering in my Race and Racism course. I agree that constantly being labeled is completely repulsive. I despise the fact that men are able to look at a women as sexual objects and not be shamed for it. As I continued reading your post I found myself connecting your thoughts to race and racism. You kept mentioning the word "label" which make me think of all the labels put on non-white people. African Americans, Native Americans, Muslims and so many other ethnicities are labeled everyday. African Americans are often labeled as thieves, criminals and ghetto. Native Americans are constantly labeled as spiritual, Indians, and alcoholics. Muslims get repeatedly labeled as terrorists and bombers. Then I started thinking about all the labels put on non-white females. Not only are they labeled because of their gender, but also for their ethnicity. This really got me thinking. Imagine living in a world where you're shamed for everything about you. We should be living in a world where we praise one another for being different; we shouldn't be putting them down. Why would we all want to be the same?

5 années 10 mois ago

"Give you're 110% tonight boys!" to fight racism

The reason I am responding too this article is because the title really caught my eye and once I started to read what it was about, I felt a great connection too it because I am very involved in sports. I agree with what you said in the article, It is sad to say but it is true the level of racism and stereotyping that some athletes’ go through on a daily basis is extremely painful to hear about, let alone live with it everyday. These are athletes who have devoted their lives to the sport they love and they can’t be proud of it because they get negative media attention all due to their skin color. I’ve had a few personal experiences with this matter, I have a friend who is now playing in the national hockey league but growing up in high school together every time people would talk about him it was always about his skin color. They would never talk about how hard he worked but they would make comments such as “It is because he’s black, he has an advantage” or “ I’m surprised a black guy plays hockey”. These are comments that people make due too jealousy more then anything else because the skin color does not determine the kind of athlete one person can be. Instead of always finding the negatives in pro athletes and every little thing they do wrong, why not look at all the good they do, all the hard work and time they put in too make it to where they are today. The skin color might be different but the heart is all the same.

5 années 10 mois ago

For the fourth comment that we were assigned to do we had the option to comment on any post that we wanted. As I was scrolling through the various posts, this one caught my eye. Throughout this semester we have learned a lot about the reality of racism in our societies; including the concepts of white privilege, and how children are not color blind. The title of this post automatically made me think of these two concepts and I was very curious to see how this post brought them together. As I was reading through this post I was very shocked by the fact that medical professionals would give different amounts of pain medication to children of different races; white children receiving more, allowing them to be more comfortable, and black children receiving less, causing them to feel more pain. I feel as though this is can be explained by the reality of white privilege. In our societies white people are often put on a pedestal, allowing them to reach success more easily in many different aspects of their life. This can be connected to the issue discussed in this post. White children are provided with the medication needed in order to heal at ease, where black children are not give the same opportunity. I agree with this post, stating that it is important to begin to discuss the concepts of racial biases with children from a young age in order to prevent future racial biases. I am curious to know if the children and the families of these children are aware that things like this are occurring in their health care system. It saddens me that there is racism towards innocent, sick children.

Reply to: Teaching Racism
5 années 10 mois ago

To start off, I chose to respond to your post because the title may have suggested to actually teach racism but instead it meant informing kids about racism which I believe is a must!
I believe that the article you chose was a good one. It touches on a very tricky subject, since it is so difficult for parents to talk to kids about racism. I also believe that it is parents who make the biggest difficulty out of it, because I believe that if parents would just take the time to sit down with kids and explain that unfortunately we don't live in a perfect world and show them the proper ways of dealing with racial problems in society, the world would slowly start to get better because people would be informed.
I do believe that kids should not be shown stereotypical story books and it is good that the author in your article created something that depicts the real world. do you think there is such a thing as a kid being too young and not mentally ready to understand?

5 années 10 mois ago

I chose to respond to this particular post because I originally thought it was about a different type of brainwashing from the title. As I read on I found out that it was about portrayal of women and it was very interesting.
I can relate this to the course I'm taking of race and racism because from what I read the major problem is that women are being treated as non equals. They are being seen as objects for men and are being portrayed in society in one stereotypical way. In the article "Human Races: Biological Reality or Cultural Delusion" Darren Curnoe says that we are all a single species, Homo Sapiens. If us humans would stop trying to categorize and label things so much maybe we wouldn't have so many issues like racism and sexism.
There is no denying that many people still view women as objects for men and see them as not being equals.Do you think that racism is worse than having sexist, stereotypical views of women, or does one build off the other or are they both equally bad?

5 années 10 mois ago

I am outraged by this comment, and if I understand well, it is the young girl who told Samara she could not dress up. I think the mother should of explain her right away why this comment is so bad. Children are not color blind, but they are very naive and do not understand the world they are in, in a sort of way. What I mean by this, is that the young girl probably did not know what she was saying. I think it is the fault of the mother, who did not explain to her; she does not have to get mad, but maybe just apologize to the young girl, and then explain it to her. For Samara, it is very sad, and I hope now she is better and her mom explained to her what was happening...even if it really sad that she had to live this. However, children are children, and sometimes it is not meant to be mean, they just do not know. Also, I do not think that it is the fault of Disney; they do not really have something to do with this. But your comment was really good and interesting!

5 années 10 mois ago

HI, I decided to comment on your post really because your title captured my attention and since in my class we've been learning about how racism still exists i decided it was a good fit.
I find it shocking from your article that, that sort of blunt upfront racism still exists. We've been learning from our course that there is new racism, and suttle types of racism which are still very bad but to think people still talk and act in such a racist manner is sad. I feel very bad for the cab driver like you said, I am very sad that people still believe in these ridiculous stereotypes, it's very unfair since Canada is rich in culturally diverse backgrounds.
So, I think it's very sad that the cab driver was harassed and i agree with everything you said about stereotypes and people being treated equally. Do you think it would have been appropriate for the cab driver to respond with violence?

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