A $48,8 Million Painting...

by J_Morin04 on Février 17, 2014 - 8:04pm

 

I chose an article that talks about painting because I do sail some of my works to people who ask me specific demands. I was wondering how famous artists could sail their artworks so expensively. I found this article that was published in 2013, about an artist named Jean-Michel Basquiat. He sold his most recent painting at 48,8 million dollars that was first estimated between 25 and 35 million dollars. The question is, do you think this painting is worth $48,8 million?

Obviously, my answer is no. It is a non-sense to me to give a material such a big monetarily value. I do not think that a painting on canvas worth millions of dollars because it is something material that can be done by anyone. The actual material of the painting and the canvas it selves do not cost extremely expensive, hence, I do not think that the result worth that much money even if it is the most beautiful painting in the world. In addition, I think that it is an enormous lack of judgment on the part of consumers who will buy this painting at such a price. 48,8 million dollars could help a lot of people in need or organizations for research of cancer, anything clearly more useful than another painting on the wall. It is against my values to buy something that expensive and not thinking about starving people, or communities who needs monetary help.

Against my personal opinion, people could agree that this painting worth $48,8 million for its unique realization and the artist’s value. Someone’s creation has no price because it is unique and no ideas are the same. I think that an artwork can have expensive monetary value because of its originality and its singularity. Also, artists have been fighting for years and years to be accepted in our society who mainly focus on science and mathematic. A painting that worth million of dollars is a proof of a great success from artists who have been able to reach a valuable level.  

This article brought me to another ethical question that can be debated for a long time: could we give anything; any objects, or material such an expensive worth? For example, could we say that a paperclip worth 48,8 million of dollars?

 

Link to the article: http://www.spectator.co.uk/arts/arts-feature/9077681/collectors-love-him...