Early Modern Knowledge (Section 14, Fall 2017)

About this class

To quote L.P. Hartley: “The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.”  Early modern Europe (1500-1800) does indeed seem like a foreign land, where kings and queens ruled over a population that would be considered both ignorant and subservient by modern standards. And yet, this was a universe that had its own rationale and a time when important developments in scientific, philosophical, political, and religious knowledge laid the foundation for the world in which we live today. Western society embraced the notion that the earth revolved around the sun, and ideas about a divinely ordained monarchy gave way to the defense of democratic forms; theologians tore apart the Christian church, and people began to think through the implications of empire and conquest as Europeans spread themselves around the globe.

How was knowledge constructed in this period, and how and why did older forms of knowing give way to new ways of understanding the universe? Moreover, how were the various intellectual developments of the day interrelated, and what does all of this tell us about the production of knowledge more generally? This course will investigate how knowledge was produced (and also reformed) in the early modern world and, in the process, develop students' capacity for critical thought and analysis. It is organized thematically rather than chronologically, and incorporates workshops and in-class activities alongside lecture material. A participation mark will be also assigned.

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2 années 11 mois ago

Analysis on Early Modern Medical History based on multiple articles and an 18th century book

3 années 7 mois ago

Hi Jonathan,

While not an ethics course, this makes for a fine possibility for collaboration.

You might ask your students to comment on a post from my class and in the comment demonstrate an understanding of a theme you cover in your ethics class.

Each of your students can then apply course content in the form of  a comment associated with the contemporary issue a student in my classs wrote about, and my student can benefit from seeing an ethical angle to their post/issue of which they otherwise might not have been aware. 

Since my stduents are generally tasked with writing about contemporary issues that they believe indicate a part of the world that should be improved/changed, without elaborating their normative ethical positions, your students could be tasked with challenging and/or exposing such implicit positions.

Thanks for getting in touch!

Gabe

3 années 11 mois ago

Hello Yisel,

I agree with your point regarding Trump's racist comments towards ethnic groups, especially the Hispanics. I like that you chose to discuss about him because it is the perfect example of modern racism. However, I think you could have deepen your arguments by explaining why he could get away by making racist comments during his presidential candidacy. First of all, Trump evidently has much more privilege than many people. He has a lot of money, he is white and he is a male. Unfortunately, in today's society, that is what defines a privileged person.
However, what makes many fellow americans follow his offensive words?
Mr. Trump is categorized in the Patriarchal World View. He is a wealthy man therefore he has control over his wealth and now he wishes to become President which will (if he wins) give him political power. What defines a man in today’s society are characterics that are in the “Man Box”: Strong, tough, intimidating, respected, wealthy, playboy and many more. Those attributes are what men in our society wish to achieve/possess. If they do not follow the Patriarchal world view, they are humiliated by society with offensive insults that downgrade their masculinity.

Here is an interesting Ted Talks video that I find interesting and I hope you enjoy as well:
https://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men/transcript?language=en

4 années 6 jours ago

Hello!
I love your article. I always thought this was an issue that should be addressed and you have done it very well. It is interesting how you told an anecdote about Zoey Roy because it illustrates how people downgrade racist and offensive Halloween costumes. I like how you added your personal thought because I could relate to it. I too did not realize of how offensive the costume was. I also applaud you for integrating course related information into your article.
However, to further your thoughts, I think it would have been efficient to develop your arguments regarding racism. Discussing the controversial word, Privilege, would be appropriate. Why is the costume inappropriate? Because the Native American costume is a method that is used to mock their culture. Those who are disguised as Native Americans would most likely be people who has more privilege than Native Americans because of Intersectionality. Intersectionality is what makes a person less privileged than an other individual. For example, a straight White man is more privileged than a lesbian Latina woman.
Besides that, I truly enjoyed your article :)
Here is a link I find interesting for your article, I hope it is helpful: http://everydayfeminism.com/2013/10/is-your-halloween-costume-racist/

4 années 2 mois ago

Hi, 

I'm concerned that October and November will not be a good fit for my students to do work giving feedback to yours, Jean-Michel. However, it may work into our essay writing section. If Eric fits well with your timeline, I will have my students participate in feedback in October/November, if it turns out to be a good fit. I will check back in as the semester unfolds!

 

Gabe

4 années 3 mois ago

Hi,

I'm a Humanities teacher (and incidentally, the founder of this site) teaching a critical thinking course this fall and my students could be a good fit for part 2.

They will be first semester, first year CEGEP students at Champlain and it will be likely the first time the majority of these Champlain Saint-Lambert students are studying in English, although they aren't an ESL group, as such.

My students could be asked to participate on step two,  providing feebdack to your class's midterm essays, commenting on any critical thinking strengths or weaknesses they discover, but also engaging with your students content. This will likely get your students excited about the work they are developing, as they will be writing for a guaranteed audience.

I'm not sure step 1 will fit with my class, however, I'm going to introduce you to some experienced teachers at the site whom I think will fit well with your goals soon!

Thanks for posting! Looking forward to collaborating!

 

Gabe

5 années 9 mois ago

One page PDF for new teachers and new students. 

Access to Terms and Conditions as a PDF for distribution in class.

(Bilingual on each side)

Documentation for users giving best practices and workflow for assignment distribution and submission. 

Tips and Straegies for students

 

5 années 9 mois ago

Upon first discussion with Gina and Susan it is clear that there is a need for better resources for teachers to get used to the site. This should be Norm's focus for the grant.

Reply to: Hello
5 années 12 mois ago

Can you test out your ability to edit and change how your posts are visible on this site? 

Click "Edit" on your post.

Then select "private- only visible to group members" from 

Group content visibility

This way, only those students and teachers who are members of your class will see this post.

Some posts may be best shared only within your class, like introductory messages meant for each other. Later posts might be best shared with the whole newsactivist network- like posts that are full of insights that all students around the world can learn from.

Let me know what you think

 

Gabe, Administrator at NewsActivist

6 années 5 mois ago

Hi,

When would you like feedback? How long do the classes run?

Are you looking for feedback on the issue itself, or on the students' writing? Both? Either?

 

Thanks!

Gabe

There no collaborative classes

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