Ocean Acidification Radio Podcast

by leochai219 on Novembre 2, 2016 - 3:13pm

Ocean Acidification

(Intro Music: 30 sec long)

Leo:

 Hey guys, my name is Leo Chai, host of Nature’s Radio Podcast and

      today we will be having a special guest.

 Harriet Minc, a biology student from Guelph University,

 who is here to answer questions about her research on Ocean    

 Acidification.

          Harriet:

           Hi, great to be here today

          Leo:

Alright, nice to have you here.

So, this is my understanding about ocean acidification.

Correct me if I’m wrong

The ocean is in great danger right now because of the constant increase buildup of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere.

As a result, there are currently many marine life organisms that are suffering from ocean acidification and the results could jeopardize every organism and being if the ocean continues to be damaged.

  Harriet:

Yes, you are correct.

Some of the animals currently suffering are shellfish and coral.

Obviously there are more organisms affected, but we won’t be

able to discuss all of them or we would be sitting here forever.

Anyways, shellfish rely on the calcium carbonate ions to develop their internal and external structures such as their shells.

The shells for these animals are really important to these animals because it protects them from predators and it supports their movement.

When the ocean becomes more acidic, the young shellfish are unable to develop their shells and the older shellfish begin to have their shells dissolved.

          Leo:

                 Wow, that sounds really painful.

                Show some sympathy for these animals, people.

As silly as it may sound for some of you, shellfish are on the bottom of the food chain which means that lots of animals rely on them as a food source.

Think about the birds, turtles, fishes, sea otters, and other predators including yourself!

Red Lobsters is one of the biggest seafood chain in America.

And believe it or not, America consumed about 1.5 billion pounds of shellish in 2014.

1.5 BILLION POUNDS!

That is an insane number and that is just in America alone.

Some of you might say

Oh I don’t need to eat stupid shellfish.

Well, shellfish predators can’t go to a grocery store or fast food restaurant and order food off the menu.

Stop thinking about yourselves and think about nature and the animals that need each other to co-exist.

This is a serious issue that can affect more than just the shellfish.

           Harriet:

                  I completely agree with you on that Leo.

 You also got to remember there are corals that are directly affected by ocean acidification.

            Leo:

                  Really…

          Harriet:

         Yes! the coral reefs are also affected by it as well.

The rising level of acid within the ocean can cause corals to bleach themselves meaning that they let go of the algae that live inside of them and it causes them to turn white.

         In other words, they would die.

   Leo:

        That is not good.

You listeners out there do understand how important the coral and the coral reef is important to the ocean right?

                 They are like the plants to our earth as it is to their ocean.

         They use photosynthesis to eliminate the carbon dioxide in the ocean.

         Now let’s use some common sense here.

 If there will be less coral reefs in the ocean, there will be less photosynthesis.

 Which means that every living organism in the ocean are screwed because there will be an increasing level of carbon dioxide.

        Which means that the acid levels will increase rapidly within the ocean.

You know that there are 4,000 species of fish that call the coral reef their home, Harriet?

   Harriet:

     Yes, I am certainly aware!

   Leo:

     4000 little fish species in the coral reef alone!

     This is ridiculous

  Harriet:

Yes!! If the coral reef were to be gone, these fishes can lose their homes and ocean predators would have to compete with one another for limited amount of food.

This chain of events is not only dangerous to the animals, but to us.

The time is now to stop this madness.

          Leo:

                 So Harriet, what can we do to help our ocean?

          Harriet:

Unfortunately, there is nothing we could do that would change the ocean ph levels immediately.

        The damage has clearly been done.

        It’s all about taking the small steps to using less fossil fuel and becoming

        more proactive to convince our government to be eco-friendlier.

        Go to work by riding a bike, carpool more, use the public transportation.

These are simple steps that if everyone participated, it could make a difference.

The earth has powers to naturally heal on it’s own throughout time.

We just need to adjust our lifestyles and give the ocean it’s time to make that change.

Be the change, make the difference, and lead the movement towards creating a safer world for everyone and our beloved nature.

           Leo:

Great way to put it Harriet.

Looks like we went over our time a bit.

But people need to learn.

Really appreciate you coming here to drop some knowledge about our ocean to our loyal listeners.

          Harriet:

                 Anytime, Leo.

          Leo:

               Well, there you have it. Ocean Acidification with Harriet Minc.

Thanks for listening guys, this is Leo Chai on Nature’s Radio Podcast, see you next time,

 

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