Racism in the Name of Hockey

by c.papadopoulos on Octobre 1, 2014 - 9:33pm

Racism in the Name of Hockey

 

The article “P.K. Subban targeted by racist tweets after Habs win” by CBC News posted on May 2nd, 2014 explains what happened on twitter on the night the Montreal Canadians won in double-overtime against their number one and strongest rivals, the Boston Bruins, in the second round of the playoffs. That night, the game winning goal was scored by Habs defenseman, number 76, P.K. Subban. Shortly after the game, a horde of angry Bruins fans crowded Twitter with vulgar and racist comments directed at Subban. Nearly 17,000 tweets were posted regarding him, which included the N-word in almost all of them, however most of the tweets were not as negative as others. Many people such as Boston’s mayor Marty Walsh, Boston Bruins president Cam Neely, head coach Claude Julien, as well as several Bruins players expressed their disappointments and apologies for this incident. Both teams are well-known for their long-term rivalry that includes bad-talking each other and each other’s fans.

As we already know and have discussed in class, Black people spent many years suffering from the superiority of the white people. They suffered low self-esteem, their inner and outer beauties were never noticed, and they never had the opportunity to “outshine” the white because their skills were never really acknowledged either. I believe that it was easy for the angered Bruins fans to hate on and sabotage Subban because they found an easy thing to target and use; his “race”. If we think about it, it would have been a lot harder for these people to find ways to verbally hurt Subban if he was white, for example, because then they wouldn’t be able to use the N-word, which popped up a lot that night. I can’t help but think that most, if not all of these fans were white themselves, and they probably just couldn’t stand the thought of a talented black player on the opposing team outshining their beloved team. That’s what it sounded like at least. We shouldn’t forget that not all Boston Bruins are white either; right-winger Jarome Iginla is bi-racial, but you don’t see us bad-mouthing him, just saying. I really liked this article because it provided good examples of what the fans actually said, word for word, as well as what other people like Marty Walsh, Cam Neely, Claude Julien and Bruins players had to say about the incident. However, no information was given on how Subban himself responded to these tweets or how he felt at that time, which could have been useful. In all, this was a perfect example on how racism is still present in today’s society, and how even little things like losing a hockey game can bring it out.

 

CBC News. (2014, May 02). P.K. Subban targeted by racist tweets after Habs win. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/p-k-subban-targeted-by-racist-twe...