Silence in Egypt

by JessicaZytynsky on November 14, 2013 - 11:03am

               In this article written by Hisham  Allam on November 7th 2013, the government wants to implement a new law: to forbid freedom of expression. Egypt, who won this right in 2011 are being threatened to have it taken away. The government wants to ban all riots, whether it is a peaceful one or not. This law states that if people go against this law they will be charged with betrayal and sent to prison. Also, they will be charged a fine of 42, 000 dollars. The government stated that this law should be put into place because if not the country will slide into daily chaos and many crimes will start to happen.  The Egyptian population are totally against this law because it is their way of speaking out to the higher power. Workers who have horrible working conditions create peaceful riots to create awareness. But now that the government wants to pass this anti-protesting law how will the workers or the population have a voice? Many say that the higher power want to silence Egypt once and for all, to bring back peace. But by taking away their freedom of speech peace will turn into anger and devastating events will carry on.  President Adly Mansour opinion of approving this law is still not confirmed.  

              In my opinion, I think the abolishing of the freedom of speech right is senseless. How can a country be in peace if no one states its opinions? Here in Canada freedom of speech is crucial for us. It enables us to show the government how we feel about certain laws or things he would want to change. The Egyptian government should not take that right away from its people because the opposite will happen. They will not be able to silence the Egyptian population on the contrary, people will start protesting and doing more criminal activities than what is happening now.  

 

http://www.globalissues.org/news/2013/11/07/17764

 

Comments

I believe that America is based off of the freedom of speech. Citizens make this country and tell the government what we want and what we expect out of it. I couldn’t imagine living in a country that doesn’t allow you to say anything bad against it even if it is in a peaceful manor. I’m stunned that the government in Egypt are taking away the rights of the people and giving them server consequences if they choose to speak up against the government. If the workers aren’t satisfied with their working conditions, they should have the right to do something about it; they government should be protecting them. I agree that taking away their freedom of speech will only cause more chaos.
I agree with what you have to say and ask the same questions you did. How could the government think this is helpful in anyway? If people don’t like the way their government is ran and can’t do anything about it, there is no doubt that they will start to protest and more problems will occur. I don’t see what was wrong with Egypt in the first place. Your article was informative and well written. Keep up with how the Egyptian government is doing!

This post caught my attention because in such a modernized world, freedom of expression is generally a given. So when it is taken away it's almost a crisis. In the US, taking away freedom of expression is literally taking away our most basic right as a human being, it's like taking away the right to be ourselves. It is important for a successful, evolving government to hear what its citizens have to say about it, so if the government takes away the right to express opinions and does not hear any feedback from its citizens, the government will ultimately fail. The people will revolt and it will create not only chaos but possibly a civil war.
The fact the Egypt won the freedom of expression as recently as 2011 is very interesting, because it is only 2013. That is only two years of freedom of expression that these citizens have had, and they will not be so willing to give it up. I'm just hoping that the Egyptian government figures out that taking away this right will not be easy nor simple and that it is a bad idea to take away a basic freedom.

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