Seeking help okay?

by shanice.newton2 on October 19, 2013 - 12:56pm

This article looks at the many issues that teens experience while making their transition into the complex world of adulthood. It looks at their moods and reactions to things that accrue in their everyday lives such as loss of friendships depression or unbalanced anger. Parents are having trouble distinguishing when these outbursts really begin to take a tool on the Childs life, and when it is necessary to seek sources other than themselves for help.

Parents seeking professional help for their children have a hard time communication and understanding them because the options of physiological help such as psychiatrists and counselling where seen as shameful or even unheard of in their time. Popular past coping mechanisms where ones such as “ snap out of it” ,“get a grip “or “ pull yourself together” but how do you know when those phrases become irrelevant to your Childs situation?

Some feel that for parents to be seeking psychological help outside the family suggest that these procedures could actually be successful. While others feel that it is important to avoid the issues of labelling.

We live in a society where young people seem to be having a tremendous amount of trouble finding their place in the world why is that? I believe that this is because of the amount of pressure and expectations from parents for their children to do well when they go out into the world. The constant interference of parents in a child’s personal life can sometimes be over whelming and can actually be the causation of unhappiness. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/18/booming/when-to-decide-if-your-child-needs-outside-help.html?ref=health

Comments

I can relate to this issue so much! It's my first semester in college and lately I've been feeling really overwhelmed with everything, the high expectation of me my parents have, feeling lost, and not knowing what I want to do with my life. Ever since I've started college I've had plenty of responsibilities brought on me, and it really effects me mentally. Trying to balance school, work, and a social life is very difficult and I think it impacts many teens physically and emotionally. It's sad to see that many teens now a days suffer from anxiety attacks and depression. I think that parents these days aren't communicating that well with their kids, so it's hard for them to notice when somethings wrong. It upsets me seeing that so many teens are unhappy, but I can understand why.

I feel like this issue explains my life situation. My family doesn't realize how much pressure they put on me until i hit my breaking point. You presented this issue clear and organized. Parents need to help their kids through hard times. They give guidance to their child everyday without even realizing it. I wish my parents realized earlier than they did. They think they're helping me but actually all they're doing is adding to the stress. The transition from high school to college has impacted my life a lot, since now I have to deal with real life problems by myself. I feel like Parents need to talk with their children more and have open communication with them. They need to realize when to be a parent and when to be a listener. Most parents don't have open communication with there children because the child is scared to get into trouble. Teens need to speak up when something is wrong. Don't put yourself in the shadows.

I think that this is a very important topic in today’s world. I see this happen all over the place and especially in my school. When parents have expectations for their kids and put pressure on them the kids feel like they need to fulfill the expectations. This will put a tremendous amount of pressure on the child thinking if I don’t do what my parents want me to do they will look at me different. Luckily this doesn’t happen to me but it happens in my school. I see it but the person that is happening to doesn’t. Parents need to encourage and support their kids in their own dreams. It doesn’t matter what the kids dream is because if you push them into something that they don’t want to do they won’t be happy.

This was a great article you have shared. I feel that it is important for a child of any age to seek help from a psychologist. It always helps a person to talk about the stress they are under and seek advice. I also feel that often times parents are afraid to get their children help because it is against the norms that existed when they were younger. Sometimes it helps if the parents also seek advice from a psychologist to help open their mind to the idea of seeking help for their child. Even though this may be very difficult for them I think it would be beneficial. They may also learn how to help their child get through the hard time they are going through. I believe the parents should also take into consideration that seeking help from a psychologist can be kept confidential. Growing up around someone who had a drug addiction changes the way I feel toward this idea. I feel that if he was given the help he needed from the beginning he would be better off today. You ask the question of why it is so difficult for a person to find their place in the world. I find this interesting. Your view on this I feel is very valid however I think that the culture in which you have grown up in also adds to the difficulty. For example, one may have grown up in a very religious home however maybe that is not their belonging. It would be hard for this person to face their family to help find and explain the person they really are and where they belong in the world. I feel another example of this would be a persons sexuality. A person growing up in a home that is very against homosexuality would find it difficult to identify themselves and find their place. They may also find it difficult to find a sense of belonging.

This was a great article you have shared. I feel that it is important for a child of any age to seek help from a psychologist. It always helps a person to talk about the stress they are under and seek advice. I also feel that often times parents are afraid to get their children help because it is against the norms that existed when they were younger. Sometimes it helps if the parents also seek advice from a psychologist to help open their mind to the idea of seeking help for their child. Even though this may be very difficult for them I think it would be beneficial. They may also learn how to help their child get through the hard time they are going through. I believe the parents should also take into consideration that seeking help from a psychologist can be kept confidential. Growing up around someone who had a drug addiction changes the way I feel toward this idea. I feel that if he was given the help he needed from the beginning he would be better off today. You ask the question of why it is so difficult for a person to find their place in the world. I find this interesting. Your view on this I feel is very valid however I think that the culture in which you have grown up in also adds to the difficulty. For example, one may have grown up in a very religious home however maybe that is not their belonging. It would be hard for this person to face their family to help find and explain the person they really are and where they belong in the world. I feel another example of this would be a persons sexuality. A person growing up in a home that is very against homosexuality would find it difficult to identify themselves and find their place. They may also find it difficult to find a sense of belonging.

There's nothing wrong with seeking help. I find society is not communicating enough, and need to develop programs where kids or teenagers can access easily. For instance I can relate to the lack of communication I faced being a child. My parents weren't in the background very much therefore which had a consequence of finding isolation. I didn't find help from a psychologist, not because I was scared but I didn't feel like people being able to know I was. Thinking about it know makes me realize there is nothing wrong with seeing a professional. You don't need to be mentally sick or something wrong with you. A psychologist I believe can help with life decisions and ways to help reduce stress. The fact of being able to talk with someone will help get what's on your chest. Children and teenagers need to be prepared for this world because its a hard world to live in. With the economy and environment being affected by our human activities, we need to let children know about the reality of the world. When teenagers start getting money from their job, they will gain responsibility which will lead to making bad/good decisions. Having another opinion from someone is good to help you judge what you are about to do in life.

There's nothing wrong with seeking help. I find society is not communicating enough, and need to develop programs where kids or teenagers can access easily. For instance I can relate to the lack of communication I faced being a child. My parents weren't in the background very much therefore which had a consequence of finding isolation. I didn't find help from a psychologist, not because I was scared but I didn't feel like people being able to know I was. Thinking about it know makes me realize there is nothing wrong with seeing a professional. You don't need to be mentally sick or something wrong with you. A psychologist I believe can help with life decisions and ways to help reduce stress. The fact of being able to talk with someone will help get what's on your chest. Children and teenagers need to be prepared for this world because its a hard world to live in. With the economy and environment being affected by our human activities, we need to let children know about the reality of the world. When teenagers start getting money from their job, they will gain responsibility which will lead to making bad/good decisions. Having another opinion from someone is good to help you judge what you are about to do in life.

I feel like this issue relates exactly to me. I am so lost and unsure of what I want to do with my life. I thought I wanted to be a nurse but I really am no longer sure, but I don't know what else I would do! Along with the struggle of schoolwork and doubts I have about getting into the nursing program, I have been so stressed over not having enough time for work and my social life. I used to work 2 jobs, go from one in the morning then the other in the afternoon. I would be making so much money a week I could go shopping for my self and others whenever, do out and not worry about having no money to my name. Now that school has started I had to quit one of my jobs (which I really liked) and now I only work one maybe two days a week. I don't even want to work at all anymore because I always have so much schoolwork and school activities to do and go to that having work stresses me out. But then, what stresses me out even more is having no money! Go from making a few hundred a week to less than 50 is awful. The stress people put on students and what they expect from them is unreal. Why have to go to college right out of highschool if you are not positive on what you want to do. Forcing them to go gives us a bad experience and so much added stress at some point were just going to explode!

I feel like this issue relates exactly to me. I am so lost and unsure of what I want to do with my life. I thought I wanted to be a nurse but I really am no longer sure, but I don't know what else I would do! Along with the struggle of schoolwork and doubts I have about getting into the nursing program, I have been so stressed over not having enough time for work and my social life. I used to work 2 jobs, go from one in the morning then the other in the afternoon. I would be making so much money a week I could go shopping for my self and others whenever, do out and not worry about having no money to my name. Now that school has started I had to quit one of my jobs (which I really liked) and now I only work one maybe two days a week. I don't even want to work at all anymore because I always have so much schoolwork and school activities to do and go to that having work stresses me out. But then, what stresses me out even more is having no money! Go from making a few hundred a week to less than 50 is awful. The stress people put on students and what they expect from them is unreal. Why have to go to college right out of highschool if you are not positive on what you want to do. Forcing them to go gives us a bad experience and so much added stress at some point were just going to explode!

First off, I thought you gave an excellent summary of the article. Secondly, I believe that parents should always seek help whenever they feel their kids need it. A good thing to do is to always sit down with your kids and have a discussion with them about what is bothering them in life. If they say nothing is wrong but totally are not acting like themselves then this is the best time to seek help. A lot of times kids regret their parents at first because it is always looked down upon by society to have a therapist. But some kids do find that it helps. However, a therapist does not always work for everyone and not every kind of therapist works. Thirdly, coming from a first semester freshman in college, I can totally relate. I feel I am always swamped with work and when I am not I feel there is something wrong or that I am forgetting an assignment or should be studying. I am starting to create my spring semester schedule. In order to do so, personally, I feel I have to pick a major to base my classes off of. This of course puts a lot of pressure on myself to find a major. In my mind I have probably changed my major around 10 times. This of course is normal. I also agree with why you believe the reason for young people seem to be having a tremendous amount of trouble finding their place in the world is because of pressures and expectations from parents.

Everyone has rough, tough and difficult, and unfortunately some have more than others. There’s never a bad time to ask for help, whether it be in the form of a psychiatrist or a friend or family member. Like so many others, I’m having a difficult time adjusting to this first semester of my freshman year of college. For as long as I can remember, my parents have always pressured me to do better than everyone else, and have always told me “there’s always something you can be doing better or there’s always something you could be studying or working on.” They never understood that I was always doing the best I can, and them yelling and forcing me to do more work wasn’t going to help me get the better grades they hoped to see. I struggled in certain subjects more than others in high school, and would always worry so much about not doing “well enough” for my parent’s approval. They couldn’t see they were the reason I was struggling. Parents sometimes don’t understand exactly what their child may be going though or how they’re feeling, thus communicating in the wrong way, only making things worse. All parents’ want is the best for their child, and I always knew that. Sometimes, parent’s just need to be taught that sometimes they’re there to listen, and other times just need to be there for support.

This issue is so relate able to me. Im in my first semester of college and i feel like i'm in over my head with stress already. I feel so much pressure from my parents to do well along with the pressure of wanting to achieve my goals that i feel overly stressed. keeping an equilibrium between school work, friends, and down time can affect a teen in college so much. It effects them in ways they have never felt before in high school. it effects them physically and mentally. Kids often feel trapped like they have no where to go. Many kids now have nervous breakdowns . Its sad to see kids not be able to handle the stress, because if parents would just talk to their kids and communicate with them, there kids would be so much more better off. I get where teens are coming from, we feel like the world is on our shoulders but still its a shame that parents cant realize this and be there for their kids.

I relate to this post because it is my first year in college and it has been a difficult transition for me. It seems as though I was thrown into adulthood and I wasn’t fully prepared despite all the years of high school that are supposed to prepare for college. The first month or so of college I found myself very upset because I missed my family, my boyfriend, my friends and my pets back home. I had missed constantly being around people I was comfortable with and being in a house rather than a claustrophobic dorm room. I did tell my parents about my feelings and they tried their best to cheer me up, but there wasn’t much they could do about my situation. Adjusting is different for everyone, and for me it just took a little more time, but as the school year is going on I am enjoying it much more.
At the end of your post, you mentioned how a lot of teenagers are also feeling this way. I think that is a great topic to research more into depth. What really is the reason why so many people feel like this? Is it the pressures that society puts on us to succeed? Or are there different reasons? Also, you could look into how children moving out affects parents and sibling. Does that take an emotional toll on them also?

I think that it is completely normal to seek help if you need/want it. Our society today puts a tremendous amount of stress on young adults from getting into colleges and finding jobs. The stress adds up and we are never really taught how to deal with it. People react to situations differently and some people just need that extra person to sit down with and talk. Knowing that you have someone that you can tell anything to is very helpful. Sometimes parents can’t give you enough help that you need and, in my opinion, it is totally acceptable to seek help from someone else. It doesn't mean that you have a “problem” you are just trying to help yourself. I am glad this topic was brought up and people are agreeing with it. I think it is a topic that people need to be more aware of and accepting of.

Growing up is hard to do, especially when so many important things are happening at once. For me, I started having the hormonal rampages a few months before I left for college. It was such a stressful time then, because I was making my decision on what university I wanted to attend, thinking about graduating high school, prom, and so many other little things that made me feel like I had too much on my plate. Although my parents and family provided strong support for me, I still felt out of control when the only way I could communicate was through anger. One day I would feel excited about moving on with my life and the next I would feel so alone, like nobody understood how I felt about actually growing up.
I have to admit that I would always blame my stress on the amount of pressure my parents put on me, but honestly I think it was the amount of pressure I put on myself. The expectations I had for myself, and then those of my family AND society can cause panic and angst for young teenagers transitioning into young adults. That being said, I completely understand your point that the ambitious nature of parents can be the cause of a child’s unhappiness. I think you did a really good job of incorporation several perspectives on this issue, like the views people have about psychological help. Some questions you might want to look further into are, at what age do most of these outburst really occur and what are some potential causes, other than parental pressure?

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This is a post that just about everybody can relate to. Whether it be starting high school, college, a new job, or moving out, expectations are often set very high by our parents. Personally, I believe that standards are set so high by our parents because they know our capabilities and also that sometimes we may need a little push to succeed. While first experiencing this "little push" it can feel a a lot like a huge shove out into the world because so much that is familiar is gone. I am experiencing this now, because I recently started college in the fall. I am away from my home, my family, and everything that is familiar to me and at times I have overwhelming emotions of sadness. Fortunately, I am able to talk to my family and friends openly about what is stressing me out. Other people may have different circumstances and may find it difficult to talk to their family about what is going on in their lives. This is when it is important to get professional help, because it is unhealthy to hold in so many emotions. Also in some cases it is easier for a person to talk to a professional about their problems rather than family members who may brush them off. It is important for parents to understand that their child is not overreacting, but just looking for someone to talk who is not bias and who is willing to listen.

This seems relatable to practically all-incoming or upcoming college students. Life is stressful, along with adding school, grades, family, and having a social life. Things can get pretty chaotic. Moving into a new environment, it always feels like the life you had before did not prepare you well enough for the new adventure you’re about to start. I can relate this to myself 100%, I have never felt more lost at college and overwhelmed. I feel as if I put so much pressure and stress on my parents when they have to listen to my emotional breakdowns at least once a week, that I worry them more than I worry myself. You are correct though, we have so much stress put on us by our closest ones to be the best that we can be and make the most out of life. The hardest part is finding you in all of this mess and to begin the experience we have always wanted. It is okay though to ask for help or guidance in life, because we are all bound to make mistakes on this journey. By seeking psychological help, it can slow down the chaos and jumble of life and start to take baby steps to becoming who we want to be. I would love to see statistics or facts that show that seeking help works and what are the outcomes. Overall I fully enjoyed this blog, I hope that I can read more from you in the future.

I totally agree with the fact that it is very difficult to admit that something is wrong in todays society. The reason being that teenagers these days tend to grow up too fast, and this creates many psychological problems because they do not take advantage of their young lives and start facing problems at a very young age. With age many teens think that they can control many things and sometimes they are embarassed to talk about their problems, which is why they keep their emotions and their thoughts to themselves, which is extremely dangerous. In society, people should be there for eachother and should not be too quick to judge, because everybody makes mistakes and goes through tough times...

I totally agree with this, teens transitioning into adulthood are expected to know when they want to do for the rest of their lives and it is an expectation to go to college and get an education before looking into a career. Precedents prior to our younger generation have set the bar higher than themselves, and that goes for every generation. So by the time it gets to the newest generation to go out into the real world and get pushed into adulthood they are expected so much of them, leading to depression, anxiety, etc. This is a great topic and there should be more awareness towards the mental state of teens that are transitioning into their adult life.

Though I am not a parent I feel as though I can relate to this article. I have always loved children and working with children and it amazes me how many of them are being misunderstood by parents. This is especially true when it comes to medicating children for “disorders” that parents claim the child has (ADHD especially). Sure, some children do benefit from medical help but more times than not perfectly normal children are being put on drugs simply for being misunderstood! It truly is a scary thought to have such an overwhelming number of children being misunderstood by their parents. They should be encouraged through the processes of growing up and many parents just do not take the time to do so. Many simply don’t know how to do so and that is where seeking professional help would be beneficial. I feel it is selfish of parents to refuse getting help when they don’t understand how to handle their children. It is normal to face hardships with raising children (based on my own observations). Acting like the “know it all” adult is not the way to face misunderstandings. Confused parents will only create confusion within the children which could result in very poor relationships between the parents with the children. Getting help is one of the wisest choices a parent can make for their children. It is very unfortunate that many parents refuse to see the benefits of furthering their knowledge and understanding their children.

I could somewhat relate to the subject because psychological help makes an individual seem as if they are in an out-group or a weak minded individual. This social pressure is massive especially on the teen age years of a person’s life. This post was extremely interesting because it engaged the reader and made them think about the social pressure that teens experience and the prospect of seeking professional help. Professional help or counseling creates labels of people, characterizing individuals as mentally weak or making it seems as though they are mentally unstable. I could relate to this in the sense that I feel like if an individual is seeking help from professionals the situation must be great in magnitude or they are just a “cry baby”. People in society today are truly trained to judge those situations on a cliché basis and that most likely will never change, although there are movements towards acceptance of professional help. This movement towards professional help seems like it had helpful effects that will follow, but those benefits of this movement will be in the professional’s wallets. Ultimately parental involvement in the personal lives seems to be a hypocritical move by parents, but also an underlying cause of many of the social troubles teens endure. This article seems extremely interesting and I would like to read about this topic further as a result of reading this post.

Being a teen myself, I know how hard it is to deal with the stress factors that come from parents, peers, and society's expectations. When the problems of a teen becomes out of parent's control, there is nothing wrong with seeking help from a professional. People that grew up in a time when professional help wasn't an option have to accept the fact that times are always changing and they have to adjust just like the rest of us. If parents want their children to be happy and to get better, they have to be willing to do whatever it takes. I like what you said when you wrote " I believe that this is because of the amount of pressure and expectations from parents for their children to do well when they go out into the world" I believe that as children try to stay ahead and on top of the goals that they set for themselves and that their parents instill in them, they can get caught up in trying to please others and lose themselves. Stress, lack of sleep, and low grades in school can all result from too much pressure being placed on a child or a teen. For this reason, parents and their children have to find a middle ground where the parents are happy and the child is receiving the care and help that they need to manage their lives successfully.

I really like this post because I think many first year college students can relate. In my opinion, the transition from high school to college is difficult for many reasons. First, you are living away from family, friends, and even pets. It is a strange feeling when you do not get to see the people you used to see every day anymore. Also, school work in college is a lot more difficult and time consuming that it was in high school. Trying to balance work and play can be a challenge. I think it is 100% acceptable to seek help with the transition to college. Here at SUNY Brockport there are many resources on campus to seek help. There is a counseling service, Resident Assistants, peer mentors, and a student learning center. All of these things are there for assistance in transitioning to college. Also, I like the point that you made about parents putting too much pressure on their children. I think that it would be helpful for parents to be educated on how to effectively communicate with their children. A professional resource is a great option in order to deal with the problem.

I really like this post because I think many first year college students can relate. In my opinion, the transition from high school to college is difficult for many reasons. First, you are living away from family, friends, and even pets. It is a strange feeling when you do not get to see the people you used to see every day anymore. Also, school work in college is a lot more difficult and time consuming that it was in high school. Trying to balance work and play can be a challenge. I think it is 100% acceptable to seek help with the transition to college. Here at SUNY Brockport there are many resources on campus to seek help. There is a counseling service, Resident Assistants, peer mentors, and a student learning center. All of these things are there for assistance in transitioning to college. Also, I like the point that you made about parents putting too much pressure on their children. I think that it would be helpful for parents to be educated on how to effectively communicate with their children. A professional resource is a great option in order to deal with the problem.

I really like this post because I think many first year college students can relate. In my opinion, the transition from high school to college is difficult for many reasons. First, you are living away from family, friends, and even pets. It is a strange feeling when you do not get to see the people you used to see every day anymore. Also, school work in college is a lot more difficult and time consuming that it was in high school. Trying to balance work and play can be a challenge. I think it is 100% acceptable to seek help with the transition to college. Here at SUNY Brockport there are many resources on campus to seek help. There is a counseling service, Resident Assistants, peer mentors, and a student learning center. All of these things are there for assistance in transitioning to college. Also, I like the point that you made about parents putting too much pressure on their children. I think that it would be helpful for parents to be educated on how to effectively communicate with their children. A professional resource is a great option in order to deal with the problem.

I really like this post because I think many first year college students can relate. In my opinion, the transition from high school to college is difficult for many reasons. First, you are living away from family, friends, and even pets. It is a strange feeling when you do not get to see the people you used to see every day anymore. Also, school work in college is a lot more difficult and time consuming that it was in high school. Trying to balance work and play can be a challenge. I think it is 100% acceptable to seek help with the transition to college. Here at SUNY Brockport there are many resources on campus to seek help. There is a counseling service, Resident Assistants, peer mentors, and a student learning center. All of these things are there for assistance in transitioning to college. Also, I like the point that you made about parents putting too much pressure on their children. I think that it would be helpful for parents to be educated on how to effectively communicate with their children. A professional resource is a great option in order to deal with the problem.

I can relate to this being the son to very successful parents and following in the footsteps of a very successful sister. There is a lot of pressure on first year college student with academics alone. Living on your own, and balancing out your everyday tasks while, making sure you are living up to your so called "expectations" is a tough thing to do. Most first year college students coming out of their senior year in high school get overwhelmed from time to time. Some students are able to adjust and move towards their goals but it is hard for others. For me, I find that the hardest thing about being a first year student is keeping up with everything and making sure my parents are proud. Leaving high school and entering the college life is a big switch for some people, and sometimes to much pressure from the parents can really make or break a student.

In my life I'm going through the change from high school to college which is a big step in life. It is very different going from living with your parents and being around your friends that you grew up with to being away meeting new people. Some people are able to react to this situation okay and some people tend to get home sick. I agree with this article's statement that the best way to handle the situation of being home sick is to not label it. For other people though counseling could solve the problem for them though. There are some of my friends that I know that had the problem of being home sick because they were too far away from home and weren't able to adapt to the difference. One of them in particular ended up going home after his first semester to go to a community college close to home where he could commute because he was so home sick.

I enjoy this post because I can definitely relate. As a freshman in college, my peers and I are all going through new, strange, and possibly uncomfortable transitions. In college, they give you so many ways to get help if you need it, whether it's academic, mentally, emotionally, and physically, in the forms of advisors, counselors, tutors, and health centers. People my age may have been raised in a family where it's normal to keep to yourself and if you're going through something difficult, to not necessarily communicate with others how you feel. I personally have come to the conclusion that it is beneficial to express your feelings so they don't bottle up and eventually explode. I would love to see what your perspective would be on how the parents are feeling about the situations aside from not seeking outside help being a social norm, or maybe if it would be even more beneficial for the parents to seek help for themselves first to try it out and then do it for their children.

This article was really relatable for me because I am still trying to adjust to life on a college campus opposed to the easy life living at home. It has been a very emotional experience for me because I am a very family oriented person. I also missed seeing my old friends, and felt too shy to make new ones. Luckily my family is a big supporter of counseling services and encouraged me to go. I sought help and after a few times felt so much better on campus. With the amount of work and responsibilities that are placed on people our age it is not surprising that many face depression and anxiety. It is sad to think that many teens are going through similar things but do not feel comfortable seeking help. I think that parents today should encourage their children to talk to counselors whenever they feel they need to.

I can relate to this article because I feel like I am going through this right now. This is my first semester of college and this is my first time being independent. Because I am away from my parents, many people back from my hometown have very high expectations for me. The people back in my hometown my family, my church family, my friends, my pass teachers, etc all expect me to do well in college and have a career that I am happy with. Because of these expectations, I feel that I have a lot of pressure on my shoulders and in addition to these expectations; I have many responsibility that I have to take care on my own that my parents use to take care of me. I feel that some parents fail to communicate with their children which are sad because the child should go to their parents about anything. In addition to parents trying to talk to their children, the children should speak up as well and shouldn't be ashamed or afraid. Nobody should be in the shadows and if a family need help, then they should seek help.

I agree with your statement about teenagers having a difficult time finding where they belong and how to act. Being a teenager myself, it is a difficult transition from being babied all the time to rapidly growing up and being independent. As a first year freshman college student, I am slowly but surely learning how to be responsible and do things entirely on my own. I can see where many teens may be having problems in this area. I am thankful enough to have the advantage of a helpful relationship with my parents and I do not need to reach out for professional’s help. I believe that talking to someone and receiving help or any kind of guidance will be beneficial to a student/young adult going through a rough time. Sometimes, it is true that teenagers feel pressured and parents have high expectations for their children. I agree that if a teen is feeling this way, they should seek help and guidance.

I feel like i can relate to the statements that you've made because i feel like my transition from high school to college has been and still is on a bumpy road. in high school i never really cared about my attitude or mood swings that i would have. being that im in college now i had to realized that things that i did in high school arent going to fly in college. So far my first semester has been somewhat difficult because im so used to being around my mom and family and now that im not i feel like im under a lot of pressure that i have to deal with on my own. my mom tells me that i should talk to somebody about how im feeling but i feel that nobody will understand because i can't explain how i feel. That being said when parents try to seek psychologist help it's not the best idea because sometimes children don't know how to open up to others. maybe its best that the parents should take action and talk to their children themselves.

My parents let me figure out a lot of things on my own in life. They did often interfere but it was mostly when I got in trouble, after I had made decisions on my own. I like this post because I have seen it first hand and can relate to it. It hasn’t been easy transitioning from a teenager to adulthood. I’ve done the most work I’ve ever done in my whole life and I’ve done it all on my own. Growing up my parents taught me to be independent and so has my experiences. When you experience certain things on your own, you learn a lot because you’re dealing with it by yourself ad no one is helping me.
In today’s society I feel as if many kids feel as if they are on their own in the world. They don’t know of all the resources available to them and figure if they are a failure if they can’t do it on their own. Parents on the other hand figure it’s a stage and don’t realize a new generation of kids exist and that these kids are becoming crazier and crazier and exposed to terrible social forces. Parents need to get into the mind of this new generation of kids and talk to them in their terms. Help isn’t always necessary, but if it is, It is okay.

I can relate to this topic since I am in my first semester of college and the stress of balancing everything is beginning to become a little overwhelming. I want the do very well in my academic work to pursue my career along with not disappointing my parents. Growing up and going away to school is becoming a big responsibly and some people aren't ready for it. I feel that i am ready for it, its just hard to adapt to the change. The kids that are not able to adapt to the change sometime do not know how to handle all the stress and end up having mental breakdowns. to relieve some of the stress they can either exercise, read a book, or do something that they love to relax them. if that does not work the kids that are overly stressed could either talk to their parents or talk with a counselor. some people think they will be either labeled or judged if they go to a counselor but there is nothing wrong with that. They are there to guide you and listen to whatever you have to say. Even if you can not handle the stress of becoming a young adult there is always either something you can do or someone you can talk to so all of the stress does not get to you so much.

This article is very relatable. It is true that we live in an age now where it is difficult for teens to transition into adulthood and as a result it is much more common for children and teens to experience emotional and anxiety problems. I can relate to this from personal experience. The hardest part of this process is actually seeking help. Often times it is difficult on a personal level to admit that there is something wrong because it may be easier to deny that an issue exists. But when an problem is admitted and the people surrounding us, whether it be our friends or family, don’t support us it makes the process of getting better that much more difficult. SEEKING HELP IS OK! I need to take my own advice as well but if outside help is necessary then those steps should be taken. It is ok to be able to deal with our own problems but there is a point with every human being where we need some outside help and that is completely ok.

I can easily relate to this. I am a first year college students who feels so much pressure by my parents to succeed, especially because my older brother has done so well for himself. I am so stressed out by the transition of becoming an adult and my parents are not helping at all. I believe that some parents push their kids way to far and they are the reasons that kids these days are experiencing depression and mood changes. I feel that it is perfectly okay for parents to seek professional help for their children. I have a very close friend who was going through a very difficult time and her parents took her to a psychiatrist and it helped her tremendously. I think that it is very important not to label a person and i do not think going to a shrink will do that. it is very important to get help even if it is just talking to a friend. It is very dangerous to let thing build up inside you. I really enjoyed reading this article, it is very well written, and i can easily relate to it just like so many other people.

I relate to this scenario greatly. I lost my best friend my senior year in a car accident. There are times where I am happy and times where I am sad. People who didn’t experience it don’t understand. I generally heard phrases as you said like “get a grip” and “ pull yourself together.” But when I was down that never helped. Normally made things worse. At first I was embarrassed to admit to it but when I realized I was better off it didn’t matter. I did seek help after losing my friend. I thought it was something I could handle on my own. But it wasn’t. I needed to talk, I needed to cry, and I needed someone to listen and understand. At first my family was enough but when it got to days where I didn’t want to exist and that was when I knew I needed to seek for help. Teens may see this as “strange” or that an individual has “something wrong” with them but it really isn’t the case. I haven’t always but do now accept anyone who needs help, especially teenagers. Maybe getting help with allow certain teens to find there place in this world or simply feel at ease about themselves and there situation. Every child is different. Every person will outbreak at a different time in a different way. That’s just how humans are and it needs to be accepted.

I relate to this scenario greatly. I lost my best friend my senior year in a car accident. There are times where I am happy and times where I am sad. People who didn’t experience it don’t understand. I generally heard phrases as you said like “get a grip” and “ pull yourself together.” But when I was down that never helped. Normally made things worse. At first I was embarrassed to admit to it but when I realized I was better off it didn’t matter. I did seek help after losing my friend. I thought it was something I could handle on my own. But it wasn’t. I needed to talk, I needed to cry, and I needed someone to listen and understand. At first my family was enough but when it got to days where I didn’t want to exist and that was when I knew I needed to seek for help. Teens may see this as “strange” or that an individual has “something wrong” with them but it really isn’t the case. I haven’t always but do now accept anyone who needs help, especially teenagers. Maybe getting help with allow certain teens to find there place in this world or simply feel at ease about themselves and there situation. Every child is different. Every person will outbreak at a different time in a different way. That’s just how humans are and it needs to be accepted.

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