Asia's overfishing problematic and the need of aquaculture

by danchelariu on April 20, 2018 - 6:30pm

In the article "Sustainable seafood farms can help Asia's oceans" by Mata Press Service, the main purpose is to show how overfishing and destructive fishing in Southeast Asia puts its sustained existence at risk, despite the diversity of the marine ecosystem. The resource base of fisheries is at a medium to high risk of overfishing in the future, as the UN reports the extinction of exploitable fish stocks by year 2048 which is an economical consequence that also affects seafood production and needs. Asia co-chair Sonali Seneratna Sellamuttu claims that by that year, the region is likely to lose a tremendous part of the bioversity and corals without intervention. A suitable call to action according to experts and scientists would be to expand the sustainable aquaculture within the region in order to reduce pressures on natural fish stock and to practice aquaculture for an increase in fish supply and also employment and economical advantages. The causes of this issue is the lack of science-based knowledge on the region’s marine ecosystems for policy information and an insufficient focus on cultivating replacements to wild catch fisheries. Also, the competition of the fishery industries may lead them to collapse as scientists propose that the fishing regions have to cease all destructive fishing and highly reduce harvest. Aquaculture is a global efficient way to increase seafood supply according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and in this case Canada may help save Asia's oceans.

In my opinion, the issue is relevant worldwide, since its consequences represent a high economical risk and also a massive reduction in seafood production and the ecosystems that are being destabilized by overfishing and destructive fishing. Also, it is important to realize those consequences are global, in order for other countries to learn from the problematic of overfishing in Asia's oceans and to prevent the situation of spreading across the world, which would create a greater issue. According to many statistics shown in the article, aquaculture is a huge step to increasing fish supplies that directly helps the whole situation of becoming worse. If every country adheres to sustainable aquaculture and to reduce the overall fishing harvest, would it potentially come to a point where it is not an issue anymore?

Article Link: http://www.asianpacificpost.com/article/8254-sustainable-seafood-farms-c...

 

 

 

Comments

Limits
This summary interested me because I was not aware of aquaculture, nor of the over-fishing in Southeast Asia. We usually hear about over-exploiting fish, but I did not know that a certain part of the world was more affected than the rest. I was aware that their diet consists of a lot of aquatic animals, but it had not dawned into me how vulnerable they would be. We are a lot about switching to insect-based nutrition in the future instead of meat, but I wonder if other alternatives can be found and if the over-exploitation of fishes was taken into consideration. In addition, sustainable aquaculture was something I had never heard about. Sustainable development, sustainable agriculture and sustainable energy are all concepts we know about, so it is easy to know what the idea behind it is. The fact that the FAO even described it as a solution makes me very interested, and I plan on doing more research on it. It makes you wonder how sustainable aquaculture and acidification interact with each other. It would have been nice to hear more about the ways through which exactly Canada could help South Asia to save its seafood supply. In addition, to know that the extinction of exploitable fishes has grave economic repercussions demonstrates once again that climate change, though an environmental issue, will affect all disciplines, sectors, etc. The systems approach is once again visible. Even if the consequences might impact poor and developing countries first due to their ow socioeconomic conditions, all countries will be affected. Nature has no limits. We are worried about our planet, but I do not think it has dawned into people yet that Earth will regenerate itself, no matter how long it takes, but we will not.

I chose to respond to your article because the mention of aquaculture caught my attention. Since you seem to be very solution-focused toward global overfishing, I thought that I would swing by and add another solution against the dramatic decrease in fish species. First, scientists are currently creating barcodes for fish based on their DNA. These barcodes are quite similar to the ones you see on food items that you buy at the grocery store. However, each one of them contains valuable information on a fish specie such as its name or where it came from. After compiling an electronic database of fish barcodes, scientists would like to use these barcodes to help differentiate between protected populations and endangered species. Eventually, these barcodes could help a customer like you to buy abundant types of fish. Likewise, under the guidance of these barcodes, you will be able to avoid fish and shellfish that are fished using unsustainable methods, or are known to be facing massive population losses. While these barcodes can help you to become a more informed customer and to make environmentally friendly consumption choices, why not start informing yourself now? As a good starting guideline, you can buy smaller fish that are lower on the food chain or local fish that are sustainably caught. All in all, you can be the change you want to see in the world by making responsible and ocean-friendly choices - at home, at the grocery store or while eating out.

http://ocean.si.edu/sustainable-seafood

Reading this article, I realized a lot of things I did not knew before. When it says that in 2048, overfishing will create extinction I was shook. This is in less than 50 years that means that were going to face serious economical consequences very soon. Aquaculture is a new topic that I learned from this article and this is why I found it even more interesting. I had heard about aquaculture but I never realized it could be a great solution in South China for example. But I don’t think that it means we should strop caring about the ocean. It is sad to realize how much we use our resources badly and we don’t seem to understand how important the ocean is. This article is important because even if for now it concerned Asia, it will eventually concern more people around the world because the extinction of some species will have negative impacts on everyone.

This article was really good and pertinent and I totally agree with the fact that this issue should be taken seriously worldwide before it is too late and we don't even realize it.

Reading this article, I realized a lot of things I did not knew before. When it says that in 2048, overfishing will create extinction I was shook. This is in less than 50 years that means that were going to face serious economical consequences very soon. Aquaculture is a new topic that I learned from this article and this is why I found it even more interesting. I had heard about aquaculture but I never realized it could be a great solution in South China for example. But I don’t think that it means we should strop caring about the ocean. It is sad to realize how much we use our resources badly and we don’t seem to understand how important the ocean is. This article is important because even if for now it concerned Asia, it will eventually concern more people around the world because the extinction of some species will have negative impacts on everyone.

This article was really good and pertinent and I totally agree with the fact that this issue should be taken seriously worldwide before it is too late and we don't even realize it.

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