Rebuilding Our Fish Stocks

by KLefebvre on November 6, 2015 - 11:44pm

The article, “Collective rights ‘offer hope for global fisheries’” by Mark Kinver released in 2013 on BBC News reflects the problem of overfishing and the possible solutions to this global issue. Ragnar Arnason from Iceland University emphasized on the fact that the previous trials failed to protect the fishery industry (Kinver, 2013, para 1). Indeed, he said that there is major problem of global over-exploitation of fish. According to him, the problem started due to the improvement of technology available for fishers and the rise in human population. Arnason also explained that when a resource is available, humans tend to compete for it and it leads to over-exploitation like we can observe with potable water and forests (Kinver, 2013, para11-12). However, the solution is known. Management grounded on individual right would bring the fishers to treat carefully the resource for long-term profits (Kinver, 2013, para 7-8). Territorial right which implies that a part of the ocean belong to a group in specific can also be beneficial for the sustainability of the fishery industry. With this principle, the fishers would have a certain percentage allowed for exploiting the resource. Therefore, they would have no more competition for the resource and it would create a greater concern on the fish stock since the more fish available in the ocean, the more they can exploit the resource (Kinver, 2013, para19-21). Arnason concludes by stating that “before you get the gains, you have to rebuild the fish stocks” (Kinver, 2013, para 30).

Arnason made the point clear: we are over-exploiting fish and actions are required. I agree with his point of view that human tend to over-consume when a resource is available and valuable. It is one of our many flaws to always try to get more and it is leading to the destruction of many resources. Fish is a semi-renewable resource but if we continue to exploit it like we do now there will be not enough fish to replace the previous generations. Humans need to act together to put a limit to the fish industry. As Arnason suggested, I believe that legislation based on individual or territorial right would beneficiate the marine ecosystem. In other words, the government should allow the fishers to catch only a percentage of the resource available so that fishers have more interest in preserving the fish stocks.

Link:
Kinver, M. (2013, September 24). Collective right ‘offer hope for global fisheries’. BBC News. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24209950

Comments

Hello,

Great article and topic! It is always great to keep these issues circulating and creating awareness for issues like over fishing and the need for more sustainable practices. With that I agree with you on the fact that if we continue to harvest our fish stocks with out a change in fishing practices and harvest capacity we will delete our fish stock and the famous east coast cod fishing crisis is always a reminder of this potential threat. It was good you mentioned about how governments need to install more policies and regulation but something to consider is that demand for fish will still be as high before installing those policies than before. Another mechanism to combat unsustainable practices can be brought directly to consumers with sustainable certifications (E.G MSC) that approve if seafood have been caught in a sustainable method. This helps to put more demand for sustainable fishing and can help the policies governments put in place.

A new study found that the population northern cod is making a slow but steady comeback. The northern cod was almost completely wiped out in the 1990’s. It became a worldwide warning for overfishing. When the threat of being wiped out was first made, a moratorium was put in place. This ongoing moratorium on the cod fishery has helped the once-mighty stock rebuild, adding that protection from excessive fishing is critical to its continued recovery. However, despite the rise in fish stock, researchers say that it will take more time to rebuild before any commercial fishing can resume. This gives hope to other areas around the world that are facing the same stock depletion that things can get better. It will just take time and new rules put in place.
http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/study-finds-northern-cod-population-making-...

This is a comment to a summary that I think was very well done and which the topic should be given more importance in our current society. This topic of over-fishing is not something that takes a lot of importance in the media; however, it should be more advertised so the community starts to realise the impact of its food consumption on the environment. For example, if people knew how much food is wasted and what are the techniques that are used in commercial fishing, they would maybe cut down on meat consumption. Bottom trawlers are the most damaging fishing technique for the environment because they scrape all living life of the ocean floor (para. 14). I also agree with the point you made that humanity tends to over exploit the available ressources to maxime the profits and it only realises the consequences of its actions when a lot of harm has been done. This can be seen in petrol exploitation that now has disastrous consequences. To overcome over-fishing, people started to think about solutions. The BOFFF hypothesis, which is fishing bigger fish to let young ones reproduce, was one of them, but it failed because the old fish are the more fecund ones in the ecosystem. However, the solutions that are proposed in the article seem to be good ideas to overcome this issue.
WORKS CITED
Commercial Fishing: How Fish Get From the High Seas to Your Supermarket. (n.d.).
Retrieved November 13, 2015, from http://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-food/factory-farming/fish/co...

This article was ver well done. I completely agree with many of the arguments made about how people over exploit a resource as though they are running a race and whoever catches the most fish first wins . I find that people can be a bit rediculous and need to realize that by catching all these fish it's causing more harm than good in the long run considering the fact that fisheries are closing down . In terms of the technology advancements it plays a huge role in how we fish because we can catch more fish and reel them in faster with huge nets and machines . This creates a more efficient way of fishing but it adds to the problem of the replacement theory because we don't give enough to time for this semi renewable resource to regenerate. The only thing I don't agree on is the separate fishing area for certain regions because it seems like a complex idea in the sense that other regions may argue about the area they get and that they should be in the same area as another country . Overall I really enjoyed reading your article and it raised a few questions in my head

This article was ver well done. I completely agree with many of the arguments made about how people over exploit a resource as though they are running a race and whoever catches the most fish first wins . I find that people can be a bit rediculous and need to realize that by catching all these fish it's causing more harm than good in the long run considering the fact that fisheries are closing down . In terms of the technology advancements it plays a huge role in how we fish because we can catch more fish and reel them in faster with huge nets and machines . This creates a more efficient way of fishing but it adds to the problem of the replacement theory because we don't give enough to time for this semi renewable resource to regenerate. The only thing I don't agree on is the separate fishing area for certain regions because it seems like a complex idea in the sense that other regions may argue about the area they get and that they should be in the same area as another country . Overall I really enjoyed reading your article and it raised a few questions in my head

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