Internet and Youth

by catherinefournier on January 26, 2014 - 7:14pm

Young Canadian are now accessing the Internet on their own and with their own devices. Nowadays, fewer parents feel the need to enforce rules for their children regarding Internet use. After all, a lot of teenagers own a Smartphone or a personal laptop, parents have less control over what young adults do on the Internet. Since 2005, the basic household rules changed drastically : the rule about not meeting strangers known online or even the one about not divulging personal information such as telephone and address, are not enforced like they used to. One-third of students in Grade 4 to 6  owned a facebook account despite the fact that the age restriction is 13 years old. Teens are freely navigating the Internet without exactly knowing what are the dangers.

Parents need to discuss with their children the dangers of Internet and make sure that they are protecting themselves in the online world. It is important to simply converse about their online habits because children learn more about Internet safety from their parents than from their teachers (64 per cent for the parents versus 53 per cent for the teachers.) 

Comments

Very nicely written, it is true that Internet has significantly changed the boundaries of what children can now see. With internet kids have to face the probability that they might see shocking images or a video of a bloody massacre for example. Even though you believe parents have the biggest part to play into sensitize their children, however I believe that kids will experience most things on their own, our job is more to protect them from what they will eventually see, by telling them that most things online are false, extreme or juste fake.

It couldn't be truer that nowadays children and teens are exposed to the dangers of the internet more than parents can directly control. Something needs to be done and education is definitely needed from the parents. However, teenagers have a tendency to disrespect rules which may lead the solutions to not be fail proof.

As a part-time computer technician, I often help people setup their home networks, computers, tablets and cellphones. Most people don’t think there is even a risk involved in navigating the internet and that is why I always propose security measures. It is commonly known that antivirus and internet security software are almost essential for computers, however, most people think tablets and phones are inherently safe. There are actually multiple software for identity protection available at an even lower cost than standard antivirus. Most of these software also allow the parents to customize a parental control over what is viewable by their children. Almost every time I inform my customers of these possibilities, they enjoy the safety feeling that comes with it.

I completely agree with what you wrote in this article. Like you said many teenagers own a smart phone or laptop but that is only because the parent bought them that device. I have even seen a 4th grader with a more advanced phone than my own. I know that the kid did not pay for a 500$ phone on his own and is also not paying for the monthly usage fee of 50$. His parents bought that device for him assuming that there would be no problem. If parents truly want to restrict the exchange of information over the internet than they will teach their children about internet safety before they give the device to their children.

I agree this post on the issue of lack of parental guidance. This has got to be a very consistent post on the basis that children would rather be left unnoticed parentally than having to go through supervision. Even then, there's still relevant information on how innovations of technology has led to parents being less concerned of their children. It’s on how they are approaching social networks and other ways of connecting with one another.

Let me give you my own experience, because to be frankly honest, I have been going on Facebook, and still persisting, without parental supervision. Reason being is, I don't want my parents to ever take down my privilege of using Facebook; it's actually a partial cure for my dependency on people. I don't get so many feelings of dependency anymore, but it's a way for me to get in touch with other people I know who has already left CEGEP and continue friendships from there conveniently, even if we are far apart. However, I can say that it is quite difficult to understand abstract feelings, especially if there are limits to non-verbal communication.

Of course, that doesn't take into account the safety of internet use. Luckily, though, I haven't been getting any attacks recently, except for the time when someone hacked my Twitter account and sent a few Tweets a few months back. However, I reacted on time and probably both changed my password and deleted the ridiculous Tweets. I am not on Twitter that often, though.

Let me share with you something that may become a conspiracy, but it's something I've just watched out for quite recently. Yesterday, what I found out was that, Rovio's Angry Birds website has been hacked by the United States National Security Agency. Feeling stumped, I decided to investigate how surveillance acts have been built up on our telecommunications networks by the United States. It's traced here, on the official Wikipedia page of the agency (you need to go to 'Global surveillance disclosures') : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

What I am saying in general now is, with the Internet now under constant surveillance, I think this should become a large issue to make parents aware, especially if children and teens go on Facebook or even YouTube without parental discretion. I mean, it's possible that the NSA will step in and arrest a child or a teen who is committing a crime online. And something I've also seen: there were three occasions in the past five days where the Government of Canada advertised, on TV, an anti-cyberbullying campaign called "Stop Hating Online." I actually would love to follow with them to see on how I can manage it, just in case.

So what do you say we get started in spreading the word?

This is a good news summary. The basic facts are mentioned and the content is very clear. You’ve provided the right amount of statistics to address the problem regarding parents and Internet use. While doing research, I found an article from the Montreal Gazette, http://www.montrealgazette.com/health/Pediatricians+want+bedroom+smartph..., that underlines the problem with unregulated media use and proposes a few solutions by pediatricians. Since your article identifies the same issue, but doesn’t offer any solutions to fix it, I though this article might provide you with a deeper understanding of the problem. Several shocking numerical facts as well as possible consequences of unrestricted social media abuse are presented. More importantly, the article states that pediatricians suggest that parents should limit their kids and adolescents’ Internet use to a minimum of two hours per day. Although the solution may seem a bit too utopian, I think that parents should at least be aware of it.

This is a good news summary. The basic facts are mentioned and the content is very clear. You’ve provided the right amount of statistics to address the problem regarding parents and Internet use. While doing research, I found an article from the Montreal Gazette, http://www.montrealgazette.com/health/Pediatricians+want+bedroom+smartph..., that underlines the problem with unregulated media use and proposes a few solutions by pediatricians. Since your article identifies the same issue, but doesn’t offer any solutions to fix it, I though this article might provide you with a deeper understanding of the problem. Several shocking numerical facts as well as possible consequences of unrestricted social media abuse are presented. More importantly, the article states that pediatricians suggest that parents should limit their kids and adolescents’ Internet use to a minimum of two hours per day. Although the solution may seem a bit too utopian, I think that parents should at least be aware of it.

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