Human Trafficking and The Law

by VanessaPace on February 18, 2014 - 8:19pm

Human trafficking is a serious crime and is dealt with by the law in various ways. The article “Montreal man gets 6 years in Ottawa human trafficking case involving girl, 17” published by the Canadian Press is on the topic of human trafficking and takes place in Ottawa , Montreal and various other places. “A Slow War on Human Trafficking” published by Julia C. Mead is also on the topic of human trafficking but looks more at the justice system and what should be changed. The academic journal “Perfecting Criminal Markets” I choose further goes in depth about human trafficking and crime and the dangers and consequences that go along with these crimes.

“Montreal man gets 6 years in Ottawa human trafficking case involving girl, 17” published by the Canadian  Press , is about to human trafficking. A Montreal man in Ottawa got convicted of human trafficking. He has been sentenced to six years in prison. The accused man was trafficking orphaned teenager girls and forcing them into prostitution. Jamie Brown, who is 24 years old was also convicted for the same crime in August. He was charged of nine counts of human trafficking, assault, and living off money of a prostitute who was under the age of 18.   Police say he lured a 17 year old girl from her home located in Ontario. When he lured her into his trap he had forced her to travel between multiple cities, working as a prostitute. The accused man lured these girls by telling them he would be their boyfriend, then threated, abused and bullied the girls. The accused lawyer pleaded for a minimum 5 year sentence for his clients’ crimes. Byron had the strong support of his family by his side during the trial. A 10 year sentence was sought out by the Crown when Byron was the age of 21, stating he was “motivated by greed”. The victim had testified against him in court, Byron got finalized with 6 years in prison. http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Montreal+gets+years+Ottawa+human+trafficking+case/9504208/story.html

 

 “A Slow War on Human Trafficking” published by Julia C. Mead in the New York times is about the justice system dealing with human trafficking. The United States Department of Justice, for three years has found that Long Island is one of the regions across the country where the trafficking of humans is happening. The Justice Department granted 1 million dollars to attempt to combat this problem in Nassau and Suffolk.  After a year, the Long Island Anti- Human trafficking task force was created. No traffickers operating in Long Island was arrested and only one victim was forced into prostitution. The investigations on trafficking are very complex and time consuming and they vary on the testimonies of the victims who are scared of the police. In the New York criminal code, there is no statue specifically for human trafficking which makes things complicated for authorities. The justice department then set up organization of training different forces, which helps victims obtain legal residency, find jobs, housing, and a safe environment. “We’re cleaning up the community “said Capt. Steven Skrynecki, police representative. Then there is controversy about what is trafficking and how to distinguish it. "Until you have something on the books that names this as a crime," Ms. Manning said, "honestly, some police officers who come in contact with a trafficking situation may not even recognize that's what they're looking at." -http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/28/nyregion/nyreThen theres gionspecial2/28litraf.html?ref=humantrafficking&_r=0

 

The academic journal “Perfecting Criminal Markets” presents further research related to my news articles on human trafficking and the law. This journal talks about crimes of illicit drugs, human trafficking, prostitution, and many other various crimes and state how legislators might perfect the criminal markets instead of destroying them as they are trying to do. The author states that criminal laws sometimes may create new dangers and opportunities for such individuals. Lawmakers seem to respond to these problems by imposing additional penalties to their crimes. All this information provided by this journal is linked to my topic and explains how human trafficking and dealt with the law can create dangerous situations in the criminal world.

An academic discipline that’s related to my articles is criminology. Criminology is defined as a study of crimes, criminals, victims of crime, explanation of behaviours that cause crime, anti-crime policies, and social control. This academic discipline is related to my articles because my articles talk about crime, criminals, and the law in which are all studies of the discipline of criminology. Human trafficking is a crime and the criminals in my articles were found and charged for this crime. That’s how the discipline of criminology is related to my news articles, there is a clear link.

Human trafficking is a serious crime that is dealt with in many ways with the law. The discipline of criminology clearly links and is relevant to the main topic of crime and law. Through these articles I learnt new things pertaining crime and the law which expanded my main knowledge on the topic.

Comments

I find your post intriguing because I work with clubs on my campus to raise awareness about the horrors of human trafficking and slavery in general. The first article you used was a good way to point out that human trafficking is happening in our regions, and is not just a foreign practice that occurs in places where there is no government. One thing that stood out to me about the article, “Montreal man gets 6 years in Ottawa human trafficking case involving girl, 17,” was that the offender only has to serve 6 years in prison. The victims of human trafficking are mentally, emotionally, and physically damaged for the rest of their lives, and all the offender gets is 6 years in prison. Then the excuse to get the sentence shorted from 10 to 6 years was because he said he was “motivated by greed;” there is no excuse that should be allowed to justify a person using human trafficking.

The article “A Slow War on Human Trafficking,” published by Julia C. Mead was a great way to explain why cracking-down on human traffickers is difficult. I feel as though explaining why victims are scared of the police would have added to the complications of the justice system. Also, talking about the controversy over the Super Bowl being a time for increased sex trafficking activity would add to the problems of fighting sex trafficking. I would like to add that human trafficking includes forced labor as well. Overall, I find your post well written and informative

I thought that your post was well written and it brought to light an issue that is so many times kept in the dark and that being human trafficking and the role that the law plays in relation to this issue. I found your post to be very interesting because I am an advocate against human trafficking and I have worked with organizations such as the end it movement, not for sale, and the Polaris project to bring awareness and support in the fight against human trafficking. What I have learned from the organizations I have been a part of and from the movies I have seen about sex trafficking, many girls liked you mentioned are lured into sex trafficking at such a young age where many of them are homeless or run away who are promised love, clothing and shelter by these men who end up forcing them into sex trafficking. I have also heard many stories of girls who have also been beaten and hurt while being trafficked for sex. Just the other day I saw a news story of a girl who was forced into sex trafficking at the age of 12 in Cambodia and because she asked just for a few days rest from being sold to different men multiple times a day for sex, she was beaten with a metal pipe in the eye and she now has permanent damage. I liked how you made the connection between this issue of human trafficking and the law because it is such a gray area. I think that it is wonderful that people are starting to see this as a serious problem and choosing to invest in making changes to these problems. I also would like to mention that especially in the United States we must look more into criminalizing not only the people who are selling these girls for sex but also the people who are paying to have sex with these girls. In the end if there was nobody paying for this service then there wouldn’t be a market for it so therefore it would not be as big of a problem as it has become.

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