Hate to rain on your parade but this is reality

by jsull5 on November 18, 2013 - 4:59pm

The United States offers many freedoms and opportunities that many citizens take for granted.  For example a freedom such as speech allows us to vocalize our opinions in any situation. Everybody is given an opportunity to attend public school and receive benefits such as food stamps. Unfortunately, this is not the case for people living in other countries.  These people live in a harsh reality that does not offer freedoms, opportunities, or benefits that are taken for granted by the many people fortunate to have them. Iciar Bollain, director of Even the Rain, uncovers the lives of Bolivian people where the citizens do not have these benefits and reveals that even their rainwater is taken from them (Bollain 2010). When the Bolivian citizens stage non-violent demonstrations to get the rights to their water back, their freedom of speech is taken as the army comes in and violently shuts down their protests. In the film, the characters from Spain who are making a movie about Christopher Columbus’s voyage become mentally and physically involved in the Bolivian’s fight for water rights. The issue of the Bolivians not having rights to their own water unites the people of Bolivia and also the characters from other cultures to fight for a common cause to get the Bolivians back what is rightfully theirs.

            Luis Tosar who plays Costa in the film portrays a cold director on a tight budget whose only goal is to get cheap Bolivian extras. In the beginning of the movie Costa sees the Bolivian people as inferior and only pays them a couple dollars for their parts in the movie until Daniel played by Juan Carlos Aduviri changes his perspective of the Bolivian people. Daniel is a courageous Bolivian who leads many protests and will stop at nothing until he gets the water rights back for himself and his people. Daniel brings all of the Bolivians together to fight for water rights. In one scene, many Bolivians are gathered together to discuss future demonstration ideas. Many of the woman in the scene express concern about continuing the demonstrations and the danger that is involved. But, Daniel changes their minds and unites them in the cause saying that they all must be involved in order to gain back what is rightfully theirs. Daniel yells to the crowd encouraging words and the crowd echoes back showing their acceptance and excitement for the cause. In the beginning of the film, the people from Spain making the movie do not want to get involved with the demonstrations and beg Daniel to stop so he won’t get hurt but, Daniel goes against their wishes and continues on with the demonstrations. Even Costa comes around to support Daniel and his cause. This is revealed at the end of the movie when Costa risks his life to save Daniel’s daughter and brings her to a hospital. Costa could have had a safe way out with the rest of the crew but he choses to stay and bring Daniel’s daughter to a hospital, which saved her life. This shows cross-cultural people uniting in order to fight for an important cause. Karra Elejalde also reveals uniting for a common cause through his character Anton. Anton is unlike the other characters because he immediately sympathizes for the Bolivian people and their cause. An example of this is when the entire Spanish cast is out to dinner at a fancy restaurant and all of them are ordering expensive meals and drinks. Anton speaks up and says that they are so fortunate with what they are given because they are drinking expensive drinks and eating pricy foods while the Bolivian people are desperately fighting for their rainwater. Anton starts to unite with the Bolivian people to support the cause when he gets angry with the Bolivian leader for taking away the Bolivian’s water. In this scene, Anton has to be taken out of the room because he starts getting very angry about the poor treatment of the Bolivian citizens. Even soft-spoken Sebastian played by Gael Garcia Bernal confronts the Bolivian leader about the water situation and how it is wrong of him to do. Finally, at the end of the movie Anton, Costa, and Sebastian want to stay in Bolivia and continue filming the hardships of the Bolivian people even though it is getting dangerous with protests. This shows that the Bolivian cause for equal water rights has cross-culturally affected the filmmakers from Spain and inspired them to join the fight for water.

 

Citation:

Bollain’s Even the Rain (2010) reveals the truth behind Bolivia’s struggle for water rights.

 

Reference:

Bollain, I. (Director), & Laverty, P. (Writer). (2010). Even the Rain [Motion Picture], Spain: Alebrije Cine y Video.

Comments

You have a great title that made me want to read your article. What you are saying in your first paragraph is completely true. In Canada or in other developed countries, we take for granted what we have. Our food, or water, our rights, these are all things that are normal for us to have because we always had these things. And we are so lucky that we have, but we represent a smaller average of countries that are like that. More than the half of the planet doesn't have these rights. And as you say, Bolivian people even have their rainwater taken away. Rainwater! Rainwater for us would be disgusting to drink, but somewhere else that is the only water they have. I didn't not understand which scenes were part of the movie or if they were real, but in either case, Bolivian are exploited and half of the planet is. Your article describe well what is happening in this Country, and it show us how people have to fight for there rights, something we don't have to too much. It makes us realise that we should stop thinking that everything is granted and do something to come in help with other countries that need help.

You have a great title that made me want to read your article. What you are saying in your first paragraph is completely true. In Canada or in other developed countries, we take for granted what we have. Our food, or water, our rights, these are all things that are normal for us to have because we always had these things. And we are so lucky that we have, but we represent a smaller average of countries that are like that. More than the half of the planet doesn't have these rights. And as you say, Bolivian people even have their rainwater taken away. Rainwater! Rainwater for us would be disgusting to drink, but somewhere else that is the only water they have. I didn't not understand which scenes were part of the movie or if they were real, but in either case, Bolivian are exploited and half of the planet is. Your article describe well what is happening in this Country, and it show us how people have to fight for there rights, something we don't have to too much. It makes us realise that we should stop thinking that everything is granted and do something to come in help with other countries that need help.

About the author