Vegetables Are More Popular

by Giroux on April 20, 2015 - 9:26pm

In the article ʺHow vegetables ditched their reputation for boringʺ written by Janet Davidson and published by cbc News on April 18th, 2015, the increasing popularity of vegetables is explained.

First, the variety of vegetables has increased due to immigrants who are ʺbringing some of their favourite veggies to their new home countryʺ. The most amazing thing is that these new vegetables can grow in Canadian conditions. Therefore, more Canadians can find vegetables corresponding to their tastes.

Second, the population today is more aware about healthy eating. Consequently, people want to do better choices in their food. According to Gillian Kerr, vice-president of brand marketing for Sobeys, consumers are adding vegetables to their morning smoothies because they want to add another nutritional dimension to what they eat or in this case drink.

Finally, vegetables are looking great which makes consumers more likely to eat them. There are even researchers who are looking over a cross between kale and Brussels which will carry the sweetness of the kale. They will be purple, chartreuse and bluish-green which makes them really attractive and makes people want to eat them.

Personally, I think those crosses between different kind of vegetables are an amazing idea. Since consumers seem to have an addiction to fast-food (http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/for-food-companies-fat-children-are-inve...), it could be interesting to get those tastes we like so much in vegetables so we could eat healthy food while having the tastes we like the most. I think there is hope to get a healthy population in the next couple of years since as a population we seem to be motivated if I look to Statistics Canada which show ʺfarmers' sales of vegetables hit $914 million last year, up 3.6 per cent from 2013ʺ. Maybe we found a part of the solution to help decreasing obesity among the world.

To read more about the article on the increasing popularity of vegetables go on http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/how-vegetables-ditched-their-reputation-fo...