Malnutrition is Taking Venezuela Down

by lulumgomes on September 5, 2017 - 5:58pm

Venezuela is undergoing a dramatic shift that is being caused by the regime of their president, Nicolás Maduro. This crisis of malnutrition is described in an article posted on April 18th 2017, in Americas Quarterly, by Rachelle Krygier. Krygier explains that this time of “scarcity and malnutrition are a direct consequence of [the fall of the Venezuelan economy]”. The downfall of the Venezuelan economy goes way back to the government of former president Hugo Chávez (served from 1999-2013), where they relied a big part of the Venezuelan economy on oil exportation. The Chávez government assumed that the price of oil would go up, however this was far from the truth. In fact, oil prices dropped in 2014 which had a direct impact on food prices and consequently on the population eating habits. This article shows pictures of families battling daily to find food and fighting for their survival against malnutrition.

In my opinion this is a reliable source, because of several aspects. When looking at the writer, Rachelle Krygier is Venezuelan, which in this case is a good thing considering she is writing about her own country. Also, the website where this article was posted is dedicated to publishing articles about politics, business and culture in the Americas, which means that the article was not posted in a random blog. One thing that is really important when checking the reliability of a source is to see if they mention where their sources come from. Krygier’s article gives the readers various statistics in order to support her topic and these statistics are all linked to reliable sources, such as some of Venezuelans largest universities (UCAB, USB and UCV).

This crisis in Venezuela has been going on for too long and unfortunately few people are aware of it. A small way of contributing to this issue is to bring it to the attention of the world, this could lead to world leaders standing up to Maduro’s government and to organizations reaching out to help this food scarcity.

 

PHOTO CREDITS: AP PHOTO / ARIANA CUBILLOS

Comments

Hello lulumgomes,
I'm really happy that you brought up this subject because I had no clue that this was happening in Venezuela. Your writing style is easy to read and goes straight into the subject. However, I feel like there is some information missing. You might want to add more information on Maduro's regime and on how the population is trying to survive by adding numbers of how their resources are going down and if people are seeking help in other countries. The article that you found actually writes about that so you can still use its information to add it up. Also, here is another article that clarifies more the subject: http://reliefweb.int/report/venezuela-bolivarian-republic/caritas-venezuela . It is written by Caritas who's an organisation that has over 160 members on the ground all over the world. Their policies are to inform everyone of what is going on in the world and to advocate for a fair world. I believe that they are trustworthy.

I like the way you wrote your post, an certainly think the issue you’re writing about is very worthy of attention. I was born in Venezuela, and although most of my family has moved Spain because of the tension, my paternal grand-parents still live in Caracas, the capital. What you have written is in fact correct, however there is more to the issue than what you have mentioned. It is important to note that Chavez, although not loved by all, was respected by many. He was extremely charismatic, a people person, and spoke in a way that made everybody want to listen. He was very popular amongst the poor which made up most of the country’s population. Keeping this in mind, as you mentioned, he messed up pretty badly with the oil industry and left Maduro with a very bad economy to start with. Another point that is crucial to understand, is that Maduro had close to no experience in the political world: the only training he has is as a bus driver… Also, Madura is the complete opposite of Chavez in the sense that he lacks in presence when speaking to the public, when he gives a speech, no one is stuck tot their television like when Chavez spoke. Having an uncertain economy plus having an uncertain President, in addition to what you have mentioned above, is what has led Venezuela to completely break down. For additional information on the Venezuela crisis, you can go read this article by Ray Sanchez, I found it to be very helpful.
http://newsactivist.com/en/news-summary/flacks-contemporary-issues-newsa...

I like the way you wrote your post, an certainly think the issue you’re writing about is very worthy of attention. I was born in Venezuela, and although most of my family has moved Spain because of the tension, my paternal grand-parents still live in Caracas, the capital. What you have written is in fact correct, however there is more to the issue than what you have mentioned. It is important to note that Chavez, although not loved by all, was respected by many. He was extremely charismatic, a people person, and spoke in a way that made everybody want to listen. He was very popular amongst the poor which made up most of the country’s population. Keeping this in mind, as you mentioned, he messed up pretty badly with the oil industry and left Maduro with a very bad economy to start with. Another point that is crucial to understand, is that Maduro had close to no experience in the political world: the only training he has is as a bus driver… Also, Madura is the complete opposite of Chavez in the sense that he lacks in presence when speaking to the public, when he gives a speech, no one is stuck tot their television like when Chavez spoke. Having an uncertain economy plus having an uncertain President, in addition to what you have mentioned above, is what has led Venezuela to completely break down. For additional information on the Venezuela crisis, you can go read this article by Ray Sanchez, I found it to be very helpful.
www.cnn.com/2017/04/21/americas/venezuela-crisis-explained/index.html

About the author

I moved to Canada when I was nine years old, from Brazil. The differences between these two countries are very prominent, and I think that's one of the reasons why I'm so interested in learning new languages and learning about different cultures.