Would you support killing someone if it meant saving them from a life of suffering?

by AmandaDoonan on February 2, 2014 - 2:39pm

Amanda Doonan
February 2nd 2014

Would you support killing someone to save them from a life of suffering?

Kay Carter, an 89 year old women from Vancouver Canada who had been diagnosed with a degenerative spinal cord condition, went to Switzerland to end her life by drinking a toxic dose of “sodium pentobarbital”(Keller, 2013) because she no longer wanted to live a life of suffering nor did she want to follow in the same path as her friends whose bodies collapsed. She wanted to die and be in control, so that is what she had done. Because of Carter's assisted suicide by a doctor Canada struck up a debate on whether or not Canada should legalize assisted suicide by a doctor in the provinces. The debate in this article stated that Quebec was basically on board with the decision to accept assisted suicide by a doctor to be legal, but Ottawa was not on board and actually mentioned “we do not support assisted suicide, that is our governments clear position”(Keller, 2013). Therefore making it harder for Canada to agree on whether or not to legalize assisted suicide by a doctor. The values of this debate on legalizing assisted suicide by a doctor would be, fairness and individual freedom because if the person is in pain and wants to end their life, then that person should have the right to do so. The moral claims that support the decision to legalize assisted suicide by a doctor would be that, a person should always do that which leads to the greatest amount of overall happiness because if a person is and has been suffering for a long time and does not want to live a life that way, then he or she should be able to die when they want too, to achieve overall happiness for themselves and to save them from a life of misery and pain. The values that would support the other side of this debate being that assisted suicide should not be legalized would be, order, because if it is legalized then there will eventually be people who want to commit suicide because they are unhappy which means that maybe legalizing assisted suicide by a doctor would open up doors that should not be opened. Also the value of security for people's lives. For example if a teenager felt suicidal and wanted to end their life, where does the line get drawn if assisted suicide by a doctor is legalized. The moral claims supporting that assisted suicide by a doctor should not be legalized would be that a human life has fundamental moral worth, the sanctity of life, meaning that life is a gift that should be respected and a life should be taken when a life is supposed to be taken. In my opinion, assisted suicide by a doctor should be legalized because there are many people in the world who are suffering and not living a life that is supposed to be lived because of how much pain they are in. If a person cannot function and does not want their loved ones to remember them suffering, then they should be allowed to take away their own lives. People who have severe illnesses and disabilities that force them to not be able to live a happy life, should be allowed to take their lives away if they truly want to, and that is where the line should be drawn. So again, Would you be in support of killing someone if it means saving them from a life of suffering?




Bibliography;
James Keller. (October 9th 2013). Court to rule on 89 year old doctor assisted death. CTV News, February 2nd,2013,http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/b-c-court-to-rule-on-89-year-old-s-doctor-a...

Comments

I completely agree with article! If someone is suffering and there is no cure whatsoever for their diseases, they have the right to choose to die. Nobody can decide for them that living is better than death when all they do is suffer through life. I don't know if you are familiar with another case of assisted suicide going to court here in canada so here is an article talking about Gloria Taylor, a woman fighting for her right to die like she wants to. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/assisted-suicide-appeal-t...

Hi, I always enjoy reading about this topic as I did a debate on it last semester in my humanities class. The topic definitely needs addressing. Writing articles like this is a simple, easy way to raise awareness! However, for future news summaries, you should divide the paragraph into at least two paragraphs because your article’s length could discourage people to read the whole thing, which would be a shame since the article is very interesting!

Thanks to my debate, I did lots of previous research and this is a great article related to the topic! This is a great article because it is about the situation in Canada specifically and it’s a short, quick, interesting read concerning the pro side of the topic.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/11/15/assisted-suicide-expert-panel-ca...

Yeah you're totally right about the too big of a paragraph thing, I didn't even think of it when I clicked save ! Thanks !!
Oh and thank you both for your input on my debate ! Thank you for agreeing with me and I'll be reading both or your articles to help me with future references!

Yeah you're totally right about the too big of a paragraph thing, I didn't even think of it when I clicked save ! Thanks !!
Oh and thank you both for your input on my debate ! Thank you for agreeing with me and I'll be reading both or your articles to help me with future references!

I chose to respond to his article summary because the topic has been the cause of many debates. Whether it is a moral or immoral action to perform seems to differ from person to person.

I agree with your argument that the government should legalize this process for those suffering with an unbearable conditions or permanent results occurring after an accident. Lying on their deathbed, waiting for the hourglass to run out; not only does this image cause pity but it also expands the grief of the surrounding. For example: an individual is not responding anymore due to the brain no longer responding. Not only is the family left to grief on the loss of this individual, but can not fully let go “yet” until the functional organs decide to stop on their own. This can cause agonizing pain to the family. Also, it is unfair for the individual dying without self-worth.

It is unfortunate that someone would travel to another country to grant his or her biggest wish of death. Kay Carter felt the need to exile herself to achieve peace; dying with dignity as she was fully in control of the outcome she had taken for herself. Doesn’t this quick supervised alternative conquer the thought of agonizing pain?

“The Criminal Code provisions prohibiting assisted suicide and euthanasia are in place to protect all persons, including those who are most vulnerable in our society,” said Mr. McKay (Federal Justice Minister).

Kay Carter and Gloria Taylor were two of the many individuals that could no longer bare the aching wait. Does that characterize them as “weak” or “vulnerable”?

Do you believe that the government is over generalizing when “protecting our society” in regards to the issue of assisted suicide?

News, CBC. "Assisted suicide appeal to be heard by Supreme Court - British Columbia - CBC News." CBCnews. CBC/Radio Canada, 16 Jan. 2014. Web. 15 Feb. 2014. .

Just as you Amanda Doonan, I belief that society should allow people die if they suffered and if they wanted to. But, I do not think that the doctor is ‘killing’ the person who wants to die, he ‘let him go’. We should support and try to understand each other. It is our duty to help people in need. In my opinion, it is the duty of the doctor to the best that he can to help the person suffering and sometimes, it means stopping the machine that is keeping the person alive and let him go.

Just as you Amanda Doonan, I belief that society should allow people die if they suffered and if they wanted to. But, I do not think that the doctor is ‘killing’ the person who wants to die, he ‘let him go’. We should support and try to understand each other. It is our duty to help people in need. In my opinion, it is the duty of the doctor to the best that he can to help the person suffering and sometimes, it means stopping the machine that is keeping the person alive and let him go.