Why Compromise Is Difficult In Gun Control

by Camille A-G on December 3, 2017 - 11:04am

After the Last Vegas shooting that happened on October 1st, Stephen Collinson wrote an article for CNN where he discusses the reactions of the shooting that rose the topic of gun control in the United States. 

 

Last Vegas’ shooting was the deadliest in the history of the nation, and Collinson explains that, with at least 59 people dead and more than 500 injured, Democrats reacted by demanding more gun control, whereas Republicans offered condolences. On one side, some believe that tragic events like this prove the need for change, like Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts who wrote on Twitter that ‘’Thoughts & prayers are NOT enough.’’ On the other side, Conservatives were angered by the Democrats bringing politics into such catastrophic event, including Texas’ Senator John Cornyn who said ‘’I just think it’s disgusting.’’

 

Collinson mentions that such a shooting, even though it is the deadliest in the history of the United States, is unlikely sufficient to make a change in the gun laws of this gun-devoted country. Despite the public support for more gun control laws that is often seen after mass shootings, the chances of reform are reduced, especially since the Republicans have taken place in the White House and in Congress. Change seems less promising than when President Barack Obama failed to make a change after the Sandy Hook school massacre in 2012.

 

The debate of gun control is still a controversial topic in the nation, as the issue has been present for decades and opposing ideas make for difficulty in the chance of compromise. 

 

On one side, Republicans believe that guns are fundamental in their identity as Americans, as it is written in the Second Amendment of their Constitution. Moreover, they believe that a person’s mental health issue should not compromise their basic right to own this weapon. Supporting this idea is president Donald Trump, who after the Las Vegas shooting, offered comfort and grief: ‘’We pray for the entire nation to find unity and peace. And we pray for the day when evil is banished, and the innocent are safe from hatred and fear.’’ While the emotion was grandly present in the White House, no desire for change was brought up. Some argued, like Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin, that ‘’to all those political opportunists who are seizing on the tragedy in Las Vegas to call for more guns regs... You can’t regulate evil.’’

 

On the other side, Democrats showed grief and the need for change in gun laws. Hilary Clinton, who supports gun control, said that ‘’Until we change the political calculation or a lot of elected officials and get a much more vigorous campaign... we are still just going to be fighting rearguard actions.’’ The Democrats, who are against assault rifles and desire more background checks, believe that the power of the National Rifle Association that supports the Republican party stops them from making action. 

 

One of the reason that the gun debate is still present comes from the difficulty of making change, as in the structure of chamber, states like California and New York have the same voting power as conservative states like Wyoming or Arkansas. Thus, the decision of making a bill becomes extremely difficult, and making a reform will take years and will have to begin in city and states. 

 

I believe it is disappointing that after so many mass shootings and deaths related to guns in the United States, there is still barely any change regarding gun control. I completely respect Republicans’ value of gun ownership, although I personally believe that there needs to be control, both in the type of weapon used, and in the background checks to make sure that these weapons land in the hands of people who are mentally healthy. One of my values is security and safety, and I believe that guns, although some argue they are used for safety, do the opposite. Coming from a country where guns are not allowed, I have grown up feeling safe as no weapons were ever present in my life, or any friend’s life. Therefore, my past experiences of the notion of safety without guns in Canada makes me wonder why Americans do not see the danger of guns. Again, I completely respect their desire to keep guns, although I believe that they should find compromise to keep the guns but with strong control to stop events like the one in Las Vegas.

 

 

Work Cited

Collinson, Stephen. ‘’The gun debate, again.’’ CNN Politics, 3 Oct. 2017, http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/02/politics/donald-trump-las-vegas-gun-debate/index.html. Accessed 4 November 2017.

 

 

Comments

I completely agree with you on this issue. There have been so many shootings, and so many deaths, it's so surprising that nothing has been done on the matter. It scares me just to think that so many more people are going to lose their lives just because there is no control over the weapons in the US. I fully agree with you that there should be laws and background checks on those who own guns because so many deaths have been in the hands of mentally unhealthy people. We could stop so much harm by just putting some laws upfront on weapons used. I'm not implying that guns shouldn't be allowed, but I think they need some rules for safety. I completely respect them wanting to have weapons and guns, but there should be a way to have guns safely so many more people won't get hurt at events such as the one that happened in Las Vegas.

Hi! the content of your post and the fluidity of it is really good. While I also respect the people who feel more in security by owning a gun, I don't understand their mentality since I have not lived there. Like you, I live in Canada and I have never felt the need to have a gun with me to feel safe. I believe that by making the process of obtaining a gun more meticulous and making sure that those who sell guns and buy them have past a certain number of tests could decrease the amount devastating event. One solution could be to make a follow up of gun holders and gun buyers just to make sure everything is okay.

About the author

I am studying languages in culture, a program in which I am learning Italian and Spanish. I have a passion for languages and am hoping to learn many more in the future. I also have a passion for writing, reading and film-making. I aspire to be a second language teacher.