U.S. Military Transgender Controversy

by Garvenski on November 3, 2017 - 6:52pm

After Trump’s policy that aimed to ban transgenders from military services, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly said that the transgender service members who sued the government were likely to win and that there was no valid argument on why there should be a ban, therefore, she advocated for the return to the initial situation. Trump had ordered that all who were found to be transgender should be discharged, countering Obama’s policy allowing them to serve.   

Justice department spokesman Lauren Ehrsam repeated that they were disagreeing with the court’s ruling and that the Pentagon was reviewing the policy.

The attorney Shannon, Minter of the National Center for Lesbian Rights, taking part in the lawsuit, said that the ruling helped his clients whose lives changed after the policy.

The President’s policy was announced on Twitter. Following that a memo ordering the Pentagon to place an indefinite ban on transgender army recruits. He kept on going by giving the Defense Secretary half a year to make a policy that would handle those already in. Obama’s administration of 2016 declared that soldiers couldn’t be discharged because of their gender identities. Transgender recruits were going to have the right to enlist in the army in 2017 but Trump initially rescheduled it in 2018. Minter says that the ruling will allow them to join as of that date.

Kollar-Kotelly refused to dismiss the lawsuit that, according to Minter, may go to trial.

 An issue that was not addressed was whether the funds required for sexual reassignment would be provided by the government; that doesn’t want to.

The lawsuit was filed by many groups that represented height members from various military institution. They criticized the Justice Department, who stated that no plaintiffs established that they would be affected by the measures in place, saying that a Naval Academy student doubted his ability to join the Navy after graduation. Kollar-Kotelly denied the statement and advanced that the plaintiffs would probably win the argument that there was no evidence that their service impacted negatively the military.

Other lawsuits were filed across the U.S. by different groups. The number of transgender currently serving is estimated to be between 1300 and 6600.

In my opinion, I don’t think that they should be denied the right to serve the country that they love. What they do should be equally recognized and appreciated because world wide conflicts involve countries and ideologies, not genders and sexual orientation. They are also humans. Honestly, they may not integrate well within their military institution because of the beliefs of others but it’s not a reason to just ban them. I think that there are many other solutions that could solve the matter that seem to have arisen. Should the government assist their integration, or should they create a special division for them?

 

 

Gresko, Jessica., and Crary, David. “Court Blocks President Trump from Banning Transgender Military Service”. TIME. October 30, 2017. http://time.com/5002664/donald-trump-transgender-ban-blocked/.

Comments

I chose to respond to your post because this is a very popular topic that i believe should be discussed more. To answer your question, i strongly suggest that the government should assist their integration rather than creating a separate division for these individuals. The reasoning why one might become a transgender is because they feel out of place at first and because they do not identify themselves with the gender they were born as. So why would we separate them from other members of the military, that would just contribute to making them feel out of place and classifying them. What does being transgender have to do with the skills one may possess in the military?

As you said, it has nothing to do with their skills or themselves. However, group chemistry is of great importance in the army and I think that not every soldier is ready to accept transgenders. It is also easier to interact with people who share the same values or character. That is the reason why, maybe, a special division should be implemented. I also see the problem of isolating them. It could divide the soldiers in two factions but I think it could also encourage healthy rivalry among the division and improve their chemistry( even though they could do that without forming a separate division).

As you said, it has nothing to do with their skills or themselves. However, group chemistry is of great importance in the army and I think that not every soldier is ready to accept transgenders. It is also easier to interact with people who share the same values or character. That is the reason why, maybe, a special division should be implemented. I also see the problem of isolating them. It could divide the soldiers in two factions but I think it could also encourage healthy rivalry among the division and improve their chemistry( even though they could do that without forming a separate division).