You Would Fix Your Broken Arm

by courtney_viv on February 1, 2016 - 2:19pm

    December 4th 2015, Jen Kirsch, a relationship columnist, posted on the Huffington post about her worst day ever. Her body seemed to have a stroke-like reaction causing her whole left side of her body to go completely numb. Following her numbing body, her heart began palpitating and could not speak or move any part of her body. She was able to tell her then boyfriend to call her father because it had never happened before and Jen believed that she was going to die. The concierge of the venue that she was at called 9-1-1 requesting an ambulance. Once she arrived at the hospital many tests were done on her. Later that night, they found out that the reaction she was having was due to an anxiety attack. She was diagnosed with clinical depression and anxiety disorder. Now that she was diagnosed, she went to Facebook to tell her friends and family, that if they know anyone who is dealing with this that they should be there for them during this tough situation. However, one of her closest friends for 15 years had told her that she should not have posted it because people would not like it and would speak badly of her. Jen also said that people seem to take it offensively if she would have to cancel plans due to having a panic attack, or she was feeling depressed.

    I’m confident that Jen Kirsch is accurate because it is a personal story which affected her greatly. Therefore, I believe that she would not make a false accusation of having depression and anxiety disorder.

    I believe that this issue should be fixed because according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 40 million adults aged 18 and older deal with anxiety disorder. This is over 18% of the population. In addition, according to Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada, it affects about 12% of Canadians in a year. Awareness should be brought to this subject because as was said before it affects many people and people still do not see the affect it has on people. You would get your arm fixed if you broke it, why can’t mental illness be treated the same way?

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/jen-kirsch/living-with-depression_b_8710500.html