Member Comments

  • Reply to: Hormones In Men Decrease, Possible Reason For VIolence?   7 years 6 days ago

    Your title caught my attention and I was intrigued by what you have to say. You have mentioned in your post that studies are blaming the drop of testosterone levels among men today compared to their counterparts 30 years ago could lead them to be violent. This maybe true and might have been an important part of understanding the nature of violent behaviors among men but unfortunately your link does not work. Nonetheless, you raised an issue about the pressures men all over the world are burdened. Men are forced to fit in a certain group of traits and values called the “man box”. Being able to act tough, aggressive, and emotionless are some the traits that a man should possess if he wishes to be viewed as a real man, if he does not, he risks being shunned by other men and society at large, and probably be deemed as weak, worthless and unmanly individual. The pressure to play this role starts at an early age, leaving some men scarred for the rest of their lives. We should educate ourselves against this very destructive way of thinking. We should raise our boys differently and help them to avoid the traps of the man box. I believe steps are being taken to address this issue but I also believe that this issue will persist because our society is wired this way and majority of us do not know better.

    Some helpful links (that I hope should work):

    http://www.acalltomen.org/
    http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men?language=en

  • Reply to: Wearing an hijab and being a target   7 years 1 week ago

    One of the few titles that caught my eyes, was yours. I come from an Islamic household and I see how the hijab can create problems. I do not personally wear one, but I know some women that do, and they get those mean comments thrown at them. I understand that these slurs are offensive and they do not have their place, but she did sign up to an electoral campaign, she must have known that it was going to come sooner or later. In our class, we talk on how appearance means a lot, specially for women. You mentioned that they judged her because of her ethnicity,but people don't stop there. They must have judged her for being old, or being ugly or any other possible aspect of her exterior. Since the brink of time, people have judged others because of something they didn't like in their appearance. I know that you wish that it didn't exist, but it does. The vandalism wasn't necessary, but the people that did that, weren't to informed about Islamic people. You always hear people saying, and like you said in your post '' go back to your country '', ''all Islams are terrorist'', that's false. Media shows only the bad parts of Islamic people. Just like us, most of them that aren't involved in wars are very nice people. This goes bad to my point, it's not only Islamic people that get these mean slurs thrown at them. Imagine someone that wasn't heterosexual, and was homosexual, he would be getting as much hate or worse from these people. We can't really do anything about it, but try to educate others about it being wrong to hurt others without actually knowing what they're talking about. We can only hope that people can start opening their eyes, and let go of things that define someone because of their exterior. I would like for that day to happen, but as it is, I don't think we will be going anywhere, anytime soon.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/05/us/maine-democrat-running-for-governor...

    In this article, a man named Maine told everyone he was gay, and was wondering why would it matter that he was gay? I think people are simply distant about the thought that a gay man could run as president, or/and governor. Since people find that the heterosexual man/woman is normal.

  • Reply to: Children Can Be Racist When Racism is Misunderstood   7 years 1 week ago

    This is a very good point you raise, its something that I didn’t think of until I read your article. I think about how I might teach my children about race one day; where would I start? It’s a subject that is kind of hard to discuss with a child, how long should we wait before we think they are old enough to have that talk? Just like the birds and the bees or with homosexuality. It’s hard to discuss a subject that in today’s society is not nearly as much of an issue so we tend to ignore them since they are not shoved in our faces. I think that it’s important to teach our children to love one another no matter what color you are or who you identify yourself as. In the case of identity, we should show to our children that being gay or straight shouldn’t make a difference in the way we perceive them. In my opinion what makes a person who they are is personality. We should teach children to understand that there is no difference between you and me physically, but how we act or behave is what we should be watching out for. If one is a gay man or a lesbian woman who are we to say that they are bad in any way. Many of the horrible dictators were either homophobic or racist. Yet people saw them as heroes or saviours, its ridiculous to think that just because one is not sexually attracted to the same thing you are or is born with a different skin tone makes then evil. People are very ignorant because no one taught them otherwise or were taught wrong. People are not born evil they are raise to be.

  • Reply to: Racism in the Name of Hockey   7 years 1 week ago

    I believe that your analysis of this issue was spot on. I do agree that hockey is an emotional sport, and many of the fans are bound to get emotional as well, but racism has no place in hockey. Fantastic players have originated from all places and races of the world. There is no race in hockey that is superior that another and therefore race should not be used as a weapon to emotionally injure a player who has excelled.Subban once told a reporter that “As far as I’m concerned, I’m looked at as a hockey player. If people want to be ignorant and want to look at me as something else then they can. I’m a hockey player. I’ve played hockey all my life. It’s a sport that I love and I’m not worried about anything like that” (Article Below). This incident was an example of people made uneasy by being beaten and tried to reassert their dominance by putting Subban down using one of the only weapons they had left in their arsenal. This not only resulted in those involved to look foolish but also showed how some people react when their dominance is threatened. Subjects as delicate as race should not be used against players of any sport because their race does not help or hinder them in any way and therefore has no relevance in the world of sports.

    Article: http://sports.nationalpost.com/2014/05/02/boston-bruins-take-right-step-...

  • Reply to: Not Black Enough?!   7 years 1 week ago

    Thanks for sharing your comment, this issue is something I suspected that happened but I never heard of a punctual story about the phenomenon. As others have mentioned I think this happened as a reflection of the predominant Hegemonic masculinity doctrine. I would like to share the concept of the ”Man Box” to make a parallel between manhood discrimination and this episode. First of all, the self discrimination reaction of a person that should perform according to the expectations of a community is a factor that most men face in their lives no matter their ethnicity. The big difference is that is done about their manhood and not about their blackness. Let me talk to you about the Man Box; it is concept that explains the phenomenon of men asserting their manhood by saying that someone else is not men enough. By doing that they push someone outside the box, because they do not perform according to the expectations of the community and at the same time they affirm their masculinity. For someone to come back into the box they have to push somebody else out by repeating the behavior of their previous predator (pushing someone out because of not being men enough). So this issue of not being “black enough” sounds a lot like the man box. I don’t think it is a matter of color, but more of attitude and conforming to a “black” stereotype.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men?language=en
    http://www.wgac.colostate.edu/men-and-masculinities

  • Reply to: Racism's Impact on Education   7 years 1 week ago

    I very much agree with your post, colored children are treated differently in school. It’s not as common as it was about 10-20 years ago, but yes there are times where a teacher’s ways of punishing a colored child compared to a white one is different. I also wanted to point out that it’s not just African Americans who are mistreated in schools but also other ethnicities such as Asian, Hispanic and Indian. Anyone who isn’t born a Caucasian man or woman could end up being mistreated in the educational system, but also since I am in a Gendered World Views class, I have to add that not only are children born with different ethnicity mistreated but so are children who don’t under being hetero-sexual or as the gender they born into. There’s a website called “edtechpolicy” which explains and give ideas on how to make children who are LGBT (Lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender) feel safe at school. According to this website,” 30% [of kids with LGBT] have skipped a day in the last month [and] 25% drop out of school”. So clearly it’s not just a racial nowadays where only children of ethnicity are being mistreated enough to skip school or just dropped out, our educational which is supposed to be open-minded and non-judgmental has clearly become racist in more than just the color of our skin but also our sexual identity.

    http://www.edtechpolicy.org/C32012/Presentations/catherine_Making%20Scho...

  • Reply to: The on-going crisis of the Harper government oppressing Aboriginals all over Canada   7 years 1 week ago

    Your article exposes some issues that are worthy of being heard by everyone and I salute you for your action.
    I want to clarify that the aboriginal woman fall into this term called intersectionality which is a phenomena that victimizes a person from a few oppressed and discriminated social groups. These differences can overlap and the result can be a multiple times greater than only one difference. For the aboriginal women, they are part of the aboriginal community that is constantly overlooked by our government and come with many bad stereotypes, and they are also females, that still aren`t equal to men when it comes to salary and other aspects of our day to day lives.
    What is sad about this story is that it took a large number of missing women before a person realized that this is currently an issue and now some organizations have been interested by it. Maybe one day we will find a solution to this conflict.

  • Reply to: Love Knows No Color and Never Has   7 years 1 week ago

    I completely agree with what you are saying. In general, as much as it is legal and supposidly acceptable, people still tend to frown upon the biracial couple as if they're aliens or something. Love is most defenitely something that is random, not planned and has no bonundries. A lot of times family does play a huge role in your relationships, depending what background you come from, your family may not always be content with the person you end up with and like you mentioned people don't fall in love with a color, they fall in love with what is inside.
    I feel like couples, including you and your girlfriend (which by the way is also a reason I liked this atricle, you're able to relate), should just be proud of who you are and if you love and care about each other then who cares what others think, because even if you are not in a biracial relastionship, people will ALWAYS have something to judge you on, so like I said, who cares???????

  • Reply to: Love Knows No Color and Never Has   7 years 1 week ago

    I completely agree with what you are saying. In general, as much as it is legal and supposidly acceptable, people still tend to frown upon the biracial couple as if they're aliens or something. Love is most defenitely something that is random, not planned and has no bonundries. A lot of times family does play a huge role in your relationships, depending what background you come from, your family may not always be content with the person you end up with and like you mentioned people don't fall in love with a color, they fall in love with what is inside.
    I feel like couples, including you and your girlfriend (which by the way is also a reason I liked this atricle, you're able to relate), should just be proud of who you are and if you love and care about each other then who cares what others think, because even if you are not in a biracial relastionship, people will ALWAYS have something to judge you on, so like I said, who cares???????

  • Reply to: Do you really need to commit to this man box ?   7 years 1 week ago

    Yes, I agree that many groups can fit in this box, just like men - women have their share of the box too, but their is much different. Furthermore, you said that men had their expectations set high, yes they do, but that's not the biggest source of their stress. At the end of the day, we humans we try to meet new people to get with. Men are pressured into finding that person, but the expectations are set so high, that it's almost impossible for the ''regular'' guys to go for. This makes me want to argue on this sentence you said, '' I think men stressed themselves a lot with that, and not all women are looking for a tough guy.''. They will find a guy that their interested in, and they will start to change how the guy is. I have seen it, women try to take advantage of the guy, and start to dictate everything he will have to do. This being said, some men will feel pressured and stop being with that person. It comes back to mainly women that dictate this, but I do not want to stereotype this, I understand that this man box is brought up in places like the locker room and the play ground. You also hear it, black men feel pressured to be in this man box, because the ''white straight male'' has the most advantage in society. I guess this is just a clarification to what I said in my 1st post.