climate change

by tatyana.borshchyov on April 5, 2018 - 2:07pm

According to the article “Climate change could raise food insecurity risk”, the extreme weather changes may have a big impact on the food storages in many countries. Specially the underdeveloped countries. The scientist had argued that with a change of 2°C higher, some places will not be able to provide the same amount and species. The study looked at 122 developing and least-developed countries, mostly in Asia, Africa and South America. Professor Richard Betts, Chair in Climate Impacts at the University of Exeter, explains how climate change can lead to the both extremes: heavy rainfall and drought. Those effects will eventually cause the loss of production despite the huge demand of nourishment. Nonetheless, such weather extremes can increase vulnerability to food insecurity. It may have not only decrease in production, but can bring side effect to the aliment we know as today. "Some change is already unavoidable, but if global warming is limited to 1.5°C, this vulnerability is projected to remain smaller than at 2°C in approximately 76% of developing countries.”

 

 

In my opinion, this could bring several damages to the food chain, thus the majority on species, including the human race, would have to consider a new diet. However, the developed countries will have more ease with this issue, by eating artificial goods.  

 

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180402085901.htm

Comments

I chose to comment on your article as it is a problem that we are noticing and living with but also because I did my summary on a topic related to yours and it was very interesting. We can agree that food production is absolutely necessary to the human survivor. Then, why can't we stop destroying our planet which impacts our ressources to eat. The food production is sensitive. A little or not enough rainfall and too cold our too warm can cause major problems in the livestock and plants production and it is crazy to think that it is mostly because of us. In an article called "How will climate change affect food production?" by author Duncan Clark, it is explained that the future of the food production will depend on how the societies will be able to adapt to the climat change which is inevitable. Furthermore, we can prepare to a certain extend because nature can surprise us at any point in time. The author continues by saying that countries with higher and richer latitude have better chances to adapt to different climat conditions.
It is scary to think that our own way of surviving is what is affecting the planet on which we live.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2012/sep/19/climate-change-affec...

i chose to comment on your article because i fully agree with you. I did research on the topics and i found information that was similar to yours. Did you know that due to an increase of climate change there are less nutrients in our corps as explained by Susan Milius in her article entitled ''Worries grow that climate change will quietly steal nutrients from major food crops''. many people are more concerned that wheat, rice and other staple crops might be delivering less of minerals and proteins in the future than they are now. She also explains how although plants need CO2 to grow, providing more can be beneficial for the nature. i.e. with an increase of CO2, poison ivy has a tendancy of growing faster than trees. Which also means with an increase of CO2 the compound of the plant can get more concentrated, meaning poison ivy will just become more itchier. Those are just a couple of facts. Back to the main topic. Already more than a billion people aren't getting enough zinc, there is also a raise in the risk of premature birth, stunted childhood growth and weak immune systems as explained by Susan Milius. With plants now losing their nutrients and proteins it can just make the case even worse and the rates increase higher. With a decreases in zinc in plants such as wheat and rice this can put more than 150 million with a zinc deficiency. a decrease in iron nutrients in grains and legumes in countries with anemia rates at an all time high can just engrave the situation. Even animals will be losing an immense amount of protiens from the grass they eat. '' for every kilogram of plants that cattle ate in 2015, there wa 10.6 grams less protiens than there had been 22 years ago'' an cited by Joseph Craines in the aritcle of Susan Milius.All these negative effects on food supply bcause of an increase of CO2 that changes up the climate. this goes to shows that if we dont fix this problem quickly there wont even be anymore proper and nutrious food for us humans and animals to eat and keep us alive.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/nutrition-climate-change-top-science...

I chose to comment on this particular article because this was a perspective i had not thought of. I have not thought of the effects climate change might bring to our and other species' diets. According to the article "potential impact of climate change on world food supply, our doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will only lead to a small decrease in global food production, although the developing countries will have to brunt of this problem as you have stated. This will do nothing to alleviate the already rising tensions between developed and developing countries. Scientists have performed multiple test on crops in order to
find solutions to cope with the rapid changing climate such as crop yield change methods and farm- level adaptations, under the assumption that water supply for irrigation would be available all over the place due to the rising sea level.

I think rather than trying to cure the problem we should be trying to prevent this in the first place. Although it might sound like a slippery slope, global warming could potentially cause another global war due to our waning food source. we should try decreasing our GhG emissions.
Work Cited:
http://ecoethics.net/cyprus-institute.us/PDF/Rosensweig-Food-Supply.pdf

I chose to comment on this particular article because this was a perspective i had not thought of. I have not thought of the effects climate change might bring to our and other species' diets. According to the article "potential impact of climate change on world food supply, our doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will only lead to a small decrease in global food production, although the developing countries will have to brunt of this problem as you have stated. This will do nothing to alleviate the already rising tensions between developed and developing countries. Scientists have performed multiple test on crops in order to
find solutions to cope with the rapid changing climate such as crop yield change methods and farm- level adaptations, under the assumption that water supply for irrigation would be available all over the place due to the rising sea level.

I think rather than trying to cure the problem we should be trying to prevent this in the first place. Although it might sound like a slippery slope, global warming could potentially cause another global war due to our waning food source. we should try decreasing our GhG emissions.
Work Cited:
http://ecoethics.net/cyprus-institute.us/PDF/Rosensweig-Food-Supply.pdf

I have decided to respond to your summary because I think it is important to warn the society about the impact of climate change on our day-to-day life. Indeed, the article states that we could limit the damages if we start now, however, will we be able to make a big change like that? I do not think so. Also, it is important to mention that underdevelopped countries would be the more at tisk to these climate changes and the least prepare to come back from a disturbance in their food chaim and agriculture. In fact, human mistakes may put the life in danger of many people living in poor countries by destroying their food production. Briefly, I think this article passes an important message which is that if we continue to live this way, we will slowly destroy ourselves starting by indirectly destroying our food supplies.