Availability of Water

by audreyannlemieux on February 23, 2018 - 4:54pm

This article by “the American Institute of Biological Sciences”, talks about how water is becoming a scarce resource. As humans, we use a lot of water, to bathe, wash clothes and dishes, for production of food. Etc. However, even though water is considered to be a renewable resource because of rainfall, our over use of its availability leads to water shortages. This article stresses that the high demand for water can threaten biodiversity as well as basic human needs such as food production and drinking clean water. Food production uses large amounts of water, especially when it comes to cattle. To produce one kilogram of cereal grain, 1000 liters of water are needed in comparison to 43,000 liters needed to produce one kilogram of beef. In this article, increase in population also appears to be a cause when it comes to water shortages. Since the population is increasing more demands for food are made and these demands require the use of large amounts of water to be produced. The article talks about how many countries are already struggling to have access to fresh water for drinking. Less freshwater accessibility also leads to waterborne diseases in many developing countries and water shortages also cause malnutrition to be very present in some countries because less food can be produced to nourish the people.

 

I believe water shortages to be an important problem all over the world. We waste too much water, with food production especially. A good solution according to me, is to reduce our meat consumption as a society because cattle uses a lot of water. In North America, especially, our meat intake is very high compared to other countries and this contributes largely to the scarceness of freshwater in other places of the world. By reducing our meat production and consumption, we could aid in reducing malnutrition rates in developing countries.

 

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1641/0006-3568(2004)054%5B0909:WRAAEI%5D2.0.CO%3B2

Comments

I chose to comment on your summary, because I too am concerned about the worlds water supply. It was very interesting to read how much water was used to produce meats, I was completely unaware of that. However I believe a good solution is first address the problems of our society, which are over consumption and mass production, then find a solution from there, by perhaps only producing what the society needs. I don't think, trying to reducing our society's meat consumption will work. Since in the U.S in 2012, there was roughly 52.2 billion pounds of meat being consumed (Barclay, 2012),which is a lot of the population and would be hard to concince many people to reduce their eating habits. However, according to Barclay, the consumption in beef has slightly decreased since the 1970's. Overall, I agree with you that this is a serious problem that needs to be fixed, as soon as possible. Good Job!

Barclay, E, (2012). A nation of meat eaters: see how it all adds up. VPR: Vermont Public Radio. https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2012/06/27/155527365/visualizing-a-...

This article was really interesting to me! I never noticed how much water we use for cereals or beef. The statistic surprised me and even scared me as 1000L of water for one kg of cereals and 43 000L of water for one kg of beef is enormous! Humans consume a lot of these two product and I am concern that if we are not more careful we will run out of water one day. A lot of countries like Uruguay, Argentina and Hong Kong consumed more than 100kg per capita of beef only in 2016. This is really scary because this article show us the correlation of water and what we produce! I think everything you say is really true, there is a serious issue and we must do something as a society to be more careful because we seriously could have a shortage of water. If everybody consume less meat I believe we could see a real difference in the future.

http://beef2live.com/story-world-beef-consumption-per-capita-ranking-cou...

This topic is very interesting because it is about a subject that could possibly compromise our well-being somewhere down the line. I too also believe that our current use of water is inevitably going to cause even bigger shortages in the near future, which will without a doubt have a negative impact on the population. The effects of a water shortage and water pollution create a lot of water born diseases. Indeed, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), “1.6 million death each year can be attributed specifically” to water pollution, poor sanitation and hygiene (Tarass and Benjelloun 240). Moreover, water shortages especially affect young children, who yearly represent between 1.5 and 2 million deaths related to this issue (Tarass and Benjelloun 240). There are also impacts on people that are psychological; for example, children coming from poor communities and suffer from malnutrition have been found to also have high anxiety and low IQ levels (Tarass and Benjelloun 241). Furthermore, water shortages affect the free time of older children (mainly girls), who have to run up to the well or river to provide water for their family, meaning that they have less time to concentrate on school attendance (Tarass and Benjelloun 242). All in all, I think that everyone should be more aware of the irreversible consequences that our usage of water resources is creating right now if we want to have a safe future.
Reference List:
Tarrass, F., & Benjelloun, M. (2012). The effects of water shortages on health and human development. Perspectives in Public Health, 132(5), 240-4. Retrieved from https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/docview/1086347634?accountid=44391

This topic is very interesting because it is about a subject that could possibly compromise our well-being somewhere down the line. I too also believe that our current use of water is inevitably going to cause even bigger shortages in the near future, which will without a doubt have a negative impact on the population. The effects of a water shortage and water pollution create a lot of water born diseases. Indeed, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), “1.6 million death each year can be attributed specifically” to water pollution, poor sanitation and hygiene (Tarass and Benjelloun 240). Moreover, water shortages especially affect young children, who yearly represent between 1.5 and 2 million deaths related to this issue (Tarass and Benjelloun 240). There are also impacts on people that are psychological; for example, children coming from poor communities and suffer from malnutrition have been found to also have high anxiety and low IQ levels (Tarass and Benjelloun 241). Furthermore, water shortages affect the free time of older children (mainly girls), who have to run up to the well or river to provide water for their family, meaning that they have less time to concentrate on school attendance (Tarass and Benjelloun 242). All in all, I think that everyone should be more aware of the irreversible consequences that our usage of water resources is creating right now if we want to have a safe future.
Reference List:
Tarrass, F., & Benjelloun, M. (2012). The effects of water shortages on health and human development. Perspectives in Public Health, 132(5), 240-4. Retrieved from https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/docview/1086347634?accountid=44391

I chose this summary because the topic talks about an an aspect in water consumption that has not necessarily crossed my mind when it came to water availability. It is very intriguing to find that there are other reasons for water shortages other than an increase in population such as the amount that has to be used in order to grow a certain crop or animal. This just shows how much of an impact these productions may have over the course of the years, which can cause a drastic change in how we have to manage this available water. It’s interesting to see that a simple piece of meat has such a huge impact on our water footprint even though it seems like it’s such a small quantity. It is especially important to be conscious of the impact our food production has on the availability of water and to know that it is possible to reduce our water footprint with less meat consumption.

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/how-does-eating-meat-impa... Rachel Curit

Wow!
Your choice of article and summary are very intersting. It is important to learn about this issue because, in my case, I was not thinking that the resource of water, which is a renewable resource, was as much in danger and I find it very scary like you do. I am agreeing with all your worries and solutions to improve this bad situation. It was interesting and shocking for me to learn the important data about how much the industries of cattle and meat need as much water as your article said. Precisely, it was «1000 liters of water are needed for producing one kilogram of cereal grain in comparison to 43,000 liters needed to produce one kilogram of beef, according to the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Your solutions are very briliant. Reducing meat consumptions is a good idea to improving water use and waste because producing meat takes too much of water that other humans around the world need. I found an interesting website that talks about how much the fashion industry is also really bad for the availability of water, which I thought interesting to share. For one cotton t-shirt, fashion industry needs to be exact 2,700 liters of water, it is monstrous! (Noble, Bethany. Fashion: The Thirsty Industry.). I wish that with all your solutions, water availability will improve for environment and other humans around us.

Noble, Bethany. «Fashion: The Thirsty Industry.» Good on you website. Fashion, Planet, The Big Picture. March 21, 2017. Accessed March 6th, 2018.

https://goodonyou.eco/fashion-and-water-the-thirsty-industry/

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