Net-Zero Homes : Green way of Housing

by davidnormand on November 2, 2017 - 3:01pm

Net zero homes are custom made homes that produce as much energy as they consume, or even more, on an annual basis. It is an intelligent design that combines different renewable energy producers, as geothermal, solar, wind, hydro, etc. Using the adequate combination of theses, based on your house emplacement and needs, and other new technologies allows the house to be auto-suffisent. They are a lot of other designs that can help like better insulation, proper windows arrangements, high efficient appliances, low consuming lights, walls with higher R-value, ect. Net-zero homes are as comfortable and beautiful as traditional homes and their cost is beginning to drop. The could actually become as affordable as traditional homes before long. For example, a house that would normally cost $361 000, would cost $397 000 if it was a net-zero home. Then, you don’t need to pay for the electricity and the gas, so along with saving the environment, you actually save a lot of money. Depending on where you live, you could save around $1200 to $2000 a year, more or less, depending on your local electricity and gas price. The consequences of net-zero homes are numerous : stop climate change, lower your cost of home ownership, having a house that will last longer, enjoy peace and quiet environment (due to high insulated walls), better health (due to wall made without toxines and chemicals), protection against possible increase in energy cost,  higher resale values and a lot of others. According to some statistics made by HydroQuébec, air-conditioning costs, for a time of 3 month, $61.06, a refrigerator costs around $47,50 a year, having a heated pool costs $530,70 for a summer. All those costs along with others ends up tacking a lot of money from your bank account, but having a net-zero home let that money stay there. Energuide, a program made by the Canadian government, consider that having a mark above 86 makes your home a net-zero home.

 

Sources : 

http://zeroenergyproject.org/get-started/

http://reidsheritagehomes.com

 

Comments

I think this post is interesting because I've briefly heard of net-zero homes but I didn't know that it was becoming something more open for the majority of the population. I was taking a look at your sources and I thought it was intriguing and that it would be interesting to mention that the American Association of Architects created a goal for 2030 to build more accessible and user-friendly homes for the population, however I feel like this construction is only really happening in Canada. I then went on to look at the house availabilities in the U.S. and saw that they cost twice as much - one home going for $749,000 - (and in some cases more) than the net-zero homes being built in Canada so perhaps that could be a big factor in their decreased production due to the fact that many Americans might not want to pay that much, especially when being coerced by politicians that global warming is not real.

I think this post is interesting because I've briefly heard of net-zero homes but I didn't know that it was becoming something more open for the majority of the population. I was taking a look at your sources and I thought it was intriguing and that it would be interesting to mention that the American Association of Architects created a goal for 2030 to build more accessible and user-friendly homes for the population, however I feel like this construction is only really happening in Canada. I then went on to look at the house availabilities in the U.S. and saw that they cost twice as much - one home going for $749,000 - (and in some cases more) than the net-zero homes being built in Canada so perhaps that could be a big factor in their decreased production due to the fact that many Americans might not want to pay that much, especially when being coerced by politicians that global warming is not real.

Hey David, the article you wrote on sustainable development was very interesting. The statistics and calculations you mentioned regarding net-zero homes are assuring for individuals who seek more affordable consumption of energy along with a minimal polluting effect. As you mentioned solar energy is a very practical renewable energy producer, although, photovoltaic energy is very expensive, still, in North America. Companies like Solarcity may charge upwards of $38,330 for an average 2000 square foot 2-story home and 72,7000 for a 1-story bungalow home according to Teslarati. Evidently, as you mentioned anyone who chooses to employ such practices in their home could save upwards of $1,200 to $2000 especially if you have an electric vehicle. To add, when you mentioned better health due to toxin and chemical free walls, there is great upside to such innovations as they have the ability to prevent certain types of diseases and health ailments. All in all, as you mentioned net-zero homes are ultra-efficient, generating clean energy which in some cases you could be compensated for when having had generated enough extra available energy. Though these practices should be implemented more often, General Contractors, those primarily involved with the construction and finance of homes tend to spend the least money possible on new homes, thus I believe this is the biggest issue.
https://www.teslarati.com/consumer-reports-estimates-tesla-solar-roof-cost/
https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/pqrl/docview/1610998067/41F0BD2019...