It is time to bring this to table: Prostitution industry should be legal.

by beckyshenszh on February 8, 2017 - 12:23am

  Nowadays, many developed countries realized the importance of prostitution industry make the prostitution business legally already. Some countries which depend on the tourist industry even use prostitution industry as a major economic income. However, not all the countries can tolerate the existence of prostitute. In some conservative countries such like China, the governments are still strictly cracked down the prostitution industry. However, their ways of doing thing does not help to stop this industry at all. On the contrary, China is still one of the countries who contains biggest amount of sex workers. And the illegalization of those sex workers created a series of issues in the society.

  According to the Global News and the Shanghainnist News Website, in 2016, one of the biggest news in China is the violence attack happened at a low-budged hotel in Beijing. On April 3th, 2016, a Chinese women post a video online and described that she was suddenly attacked and abducted by an stranger in the hotel hallway. In the video, the struggle kept for around 5 minutes and the women was crying for help. During this period, a number of people were passing by, even including hotel staffs. However, they just ignored it and no one even tried to help. According to the women, she called the police immediately after the incident. But after a few days when she called the local police and asked the progressing, the police just brushed off. After she posted the video on Chinese social media, it soon become the hottest trending topic and it has over 2 billion views. The police were forced to investigate this incident again and found out the truth. This hotel was actually running an illegal prostitution business. The host thought this woman is a prostitute from outside who would undercut their business and he tried to “punish” her. This incident brings up the issue on the legalization of prostitution industry in China. Only prevent this industry won’t help anything. The only way to reduce the risk of this work is to make it legal and let those sex workers have their right.

I choose this topic to talk about because I am from China. In my hometown, there is a little shop that runs the illegal prostitute business just right across the street. I saw the young girls in the shop everyday. They look like students and I just can’t connect them with what they are doing. I want to do something to help them. I know that only prevent them from what they are doing won’t help anything. The only thing I can do is to talk with them and make them realize that they need to stand up for their right. This can also prevent the issue of child prostitution.

 Source: http://shanghaiist.com/2016/04/07/wanwan_near_abduction_video.php

Comments

You’ve brought up a crucial issue that has plagued the sex industry: the prohibition of such services in most countries has resulted in the extended exploitation and mistreatment of sex workers. I was not aware that such an explicit example of violence towards workers trended online in China and garnered as many as 2 billion views, demonstrating that the general population is starting to become more conscious of the problem of criminalizing prostitution. The lack of response from the police and bystanders witnessing the attack raises a clear ethical issue as it suggests that sex workers are denied the same rights given to most members of society. You seem to be adopting a deontological approach to this issue, stating that you want to help them “stand up for their right[s]” by emphasizing the importance of legalizing prostitution. Your desire to help these workers, including those from your hometown, demonstrates that your point of view is intuitively influenced by your sense of duty: as an individual possessing a better socio-economic standing than these people, you wish to contribute to their wellbeing. In order to argue for legalization, you can present utilitarian arguments. Indeed, legalizing prostitution is in line with the core concept of utilitarianism which states that decisions should be taken based on the most favorable outcome for the greatest amount of people. Legalization will benefit the workers by increasing their wellbeing and happiness, allow the government to collect taxes on such services, and won’t impact the consumers. Although some individuals might not be pleased with this decision, stating arguments such as the immorality of prostitution, the benefits and number of people affected by legalization outweigh the consequences of such a decision.

You’ve brought up a crucial issue that has plagued the sex industry: the prohibition of such services in most countries has resulted in the extended exploitation and mistreatment of sex workers. I was not aware that such an explicit example of violence towards workers trended online in China and garnered as many as 2 billion views, demonstrating that the general population is starting to become more conscious of the problem of criminalizing prostitution. The lack of response from the police and bystanders witnessing the attack raises a clear ethical issue as it suggests that sex workers are denied the same rights given to most members of society. You seem to be adopting a deontological approach to this issue, stating that you want to help them “stand up for their right[s]” by emphasizing the importance of legalizing prostitution. Your desire to help these workers, including those from your hometown, demonstrates that your point of view is intuitively influenced by your sense of duty: as an individual possessing a better socio-economic standing than these people, you wish to contribute to their wellbeing. In order to argue for legalization, you can present utilitarian arguments. Indeed, legalizing prostitution is in line with the core concept of utilitarianism which states that decisions should be taken based on the most favorable outcome for the greatest amount of people. Legalization will benefit the workers by increasing their wellbeing and happiness, allow the government to collect taxes on such services, and won’t impact the consumers. Although some individuals might not be pleased with this decision, stating arguments such as the immorality of prostitution, the benefits and number of people affected by legalization outweigh the consequences of such a decision.

I believe you brought attention to an under-discussed topic and your personal encounter with the business of prostitution made me more conscious of the ubiquitous and detrimental effects of the sex industry. You seem to have adopted the virtue ethics theory as you value the virtue of empathy towards sex workers by wishing to give them basic human rights and a secure work environment. However, one of the problems with this ethical framework and the legalization of prostitution lies in the possibility of harmful outcomes. Women and young girls from developing countries like China mostly sell their bodies because of entrenched poverty, and legalizing prostitution will create concerns about income taxes and anonymity. As the majority of prostitutes are women, the legalization of prostitution would also encourage the sexual objectification of women which may aggravate the rough treatment of sex workers. Moreover, it does not solve the problem of child prostitution since no state will implement laws allowing for the prostitution of minors, yet people with deviant tendencies will still attempt to satisfy their sexual urges. Virtue ethics is not centered on the outcome, but the agent and his or her motives. Nevertheless, we can still perform an ethical and altruist act which would be beneficial to sex workers; instead of legalizing prostitution, we must keep any human being from being forcibly used as a mean to pleasure by fighting global poverty and by encouraging access to education.