Studying Level: College

by JL on April 19, 2014 - 3:50pm

    Daniel Brennan wrote the article “Why Your Good Study Habits Are Wrong” on December 22, 2013, in order to give tips about studying. According to her, lot of parents have strong opinions about how their child study and want them to finish their homework as soon as they get back home. Some believe that children learn best when they study quietly alone and should sit still until they finish all their work. New researches show that the “usual” way of studying is not the best way anymore. The methods of studying differs from one child to another, since they are all different. Different techniques help some and other routines help others. One amidst many tips of studying would be exercising the body for around 15 to 20 minutes before, because exercising may help the brain to concentrate better. However, too much exercise will exhaust the body and therefore make studying harder due to the lack of concentration. Another one would be picking a good study spot. Do not let someone choose for you, you have to find a place where you will pay the most attention. Additionally, listening to music. Many thinks that music distracts children, thus studying while listening music is less effective. According to Brennan, it really depends on the child, some finds that music negate all the sound around them, helping them to concentrate better. Others may get into the music too much and forget their assignment. It really depends on the child. One of the most important is taking short breaks, take a walk for 10 minutes, do something else, just anything. Concentration takes a lot of energy and taking breaks will help you focus all over again. 

    I believe that parents forcing children to finish all their homework and study right after school is just wrong. Most student are at school for more than eight hours a day and parents are expecting that children will be able to concentrate after they get back home. In those eight hours, around six hours are dedicated to classes where they have to listen to the teacher and do assignments. After six hours of concentration, most people are already exhausted, how can one still expect them to continue working when they reach home. 

    I don’t know about you, but I tend to always cram all the information into my head the night right before the exam. There’s a lot of bad consequences to it, for example: lack of time to remember everything, having a blank during the test and forgetting almost everything right after the test. I am pretty sure I am not the only one who waits until the last minute to study because it is so boring. Well, at least for me it is. More importantly, these are bad habits to studying and must be changed, I believe mentioning tips about good studying habits may help others who have trouble studying. 

    In more developed countries, most people take studying for granted. They wish they could just skip school, stay home and play video games or just have fun with friends. One thing that most student forget is that, a lot of people in other countries doesn’t have such opportunity. They cannot afford paying for education since they are barely getting enough food every day. As Malala said in her book “I am Malala”, education is something we pay for, it is not something that everything gets for free. Many would give up their most important things to obtain the same education as people in developed countries. I believe another reason people are having a hard time studying is because they take it for granted, they do not cherish their opportunity and they do not do their best to learn. 

For more information, feel free to visit 
http://fit.webmd.com/kids/move/article/good-study-habits?page=1

 

Comments

Your post brings up an important issue, in my opinion. In a society that places so much emphasis on schooling and academics, we generally fail to exercise effective ways to study on the whole. You mention parents that force their kids to power through their homework all at once, right after spending over eight hours straight locked up in a building learning, and that this is wrong. I can agree with you when thinking back to my high school years and how much I disliked that concept. I had little motivation to do my extra work after school, because I felt my brain was dead for the rest of the day. I just was not the kid for that style of learning.
One thing I think you overlooked, however, is that it’s not just dependent on the kid and his style of studying, meaning that one style might work for one class, while another style for that same kid might work for another different class. When I reached college, I was taking six credits of Mandarin Chinese in a semester, and it was pretty overwhelming, requiring an unfathomable amount of memorization and familiarization. The only thing that worked for me was to study and practice right after that class (my last class of the day) for four to five hours a night. In that single semester, I became more fluent in Mandarin than I did in taking German for six years, mainly because I changed my style of studying. Still, the style I used for learning Chinese would have completely failed me in any of my other ‘normal’ classes, so differing styles depending on the class should not be overlooked.

Studying for me is one of the most fundamental parts of my day. Being a biology major, most of my days consist of reading, taking notes, studying, and doing homework. I have no free time during the week and on my weekends I study at least a few hours each day. Not only am I a biology major, I am also an honors student. If it were not for my study skills, I would not be where I am today. As a kid, I had awful ADD and horrible study skills. My parents found it extremely difficult to help me concentrate in school and for me to sit down and study or do my homework. It took me until my freshman year of college to truly appreciate the significance of individualized studying. I learned that some people like to listen to music and study for a few hours a day weeks before an exam; and others liked to study for hours on end a few days before an exam. Everyone had different methods of studying and each of the honors students I looked up to had different methods. I truly appreciate your article in that it highlights the facts that kids need to learn on their own how to study. I agree with you in that each child needs to develop their own individualized method of studying that works with their personality. For me, I need to sit in a comfy chair with a cup of coffee and settle down for a few hours. I need to be relaxed and not feel overwhelmed. Schools need to stress the fact of individuality towards studying if we’re to progress in our education system.

I was originally drawn to this post because I just spent the last three days studying for an anatomy and physiology practical. I am currently a student at SUNY Brockport studying public health, and planning to go into nursing. I always find myself studying for hours, I agree with your opinions: I find it very difficult to study, it is boring, time consuming, and stressful. I thought it was interesting how you looked into the child aspect of studying, as a child I always did my homework right after school, but all my friends would procrastinate until nighttime. That was just my personal preference though; I agree that it is beneficial for children to study and do homework based on their own individual needs, it teaches them valuable lessons for college. It would be interesting to look further into this issue and see if students that were taught at an early age how to study and what works for them to truly learn material ended up performing better in their first year of college than students who were not taught how to study. I know my high school gave no guidance on how actually to study and that caused me to be lost my first year of college. It would be beneficial for schools to help children at younger age develop individual study styles and habits.

You have brought up vital information that studying techniques that should be directly decided by the person who is doing the homework, assignment, or simply studying. I agree with Brennan that students should be strongly encouraged to do their homework when and where they want. Making the child do it when the parent makes me think of homework less of a responsibility but now to a chore.

On a personal note, I find many of the techniques for studying skills combined work best for me. When I was younger, my father made me do my homework as soon as I got home from school, and I began to resent my homework and would do poor quality because I rushed and wanted to play outside. If I was allowed to do my homework after dinner, when I wanted, I would likely do a better job because I wasn’t distracted by other factors—such as fatigue, hunger, and desire to be outside and socialize. Recently, I find I mass study before the exams. I have found this is not helpful to me. Although I learn a lot of the basic ideas, I feel I miss conceptualizing and understanding many of the topics.

Brennan’s article brings to my attention that my studying routine tends to change day in and day out. To further the topic of your post, there is an outstanding article by Entress and Wagner (2014) which delves into the science of independent studying skills. The article finds that studying “active engagement must involve students thinking about how facts and concepts relate to one another” (Entress & Wagner p. 28) whereas reviewing notes is ineffective because you are not learning anything new.

References
Entress, C., & Wagner, A. (2014). Beyond "hitting the books". Science Teacher, 81(4), 27-31.

I was attracted to this post because I feel like it is something that is very common to me. With being as active of a person as I am outside the classroom I simply cannot find enough time outside of the classroom to try and study each topic each day. Because of this I spend hours in both my room and library the two or three days before a big test trying to temporarily jam my brain full of knowledge that I will not even be able to recall a week after the test.
The fact that our society now is so involved in academics has pushed this to be the new norm in studying. Being that we must take gen ed classes means that they want us to maintain loads of information that will more likely than not be of no use to us once we graduate and are working in our given fields. Students do not care to try and commit these facts to memory for any longer than they have to and I believe that is why college students as a whole study like this rather than taking time out of each of their days to learn the information.
When I study I try to use the pomodoro technique, which is much like you said, it is studying for 20-30 minute intervals with short breaks in between of 3-5 minutes. After 6 or 7 times of doing this I will take a longer break, about 30-45 minutes or so. This keeps your mind active so that trying to learn the information doesn’t become mechanical or unbearable. If you are interested in this technique you can read more about it at pomodorotechnique.com. I hope this helps and good luck with finals!

I was attracted to this post because I feel like it is something that is very common to me. With being as active of a person as I am outside the classroom I simply cannot find enough time outside of the classroom to try and study each topic each day. Because of this I spend hours in both my room and library the two or three days before a big test trying to temporarily jam my brain full of knowledge that I will not even be able to recall a week after the test.
The fact that our society now is so involved in academics has pushed this to be the new norm in studying. Being that we must take gen ed classes means that they want us to maintain loads of information that will more likely than not be of no use to us once we graduate and are working in our given fields. Students do not care to try and commit these facts to memory for any longer than they have to and I believe that is why college students as a whole study like this rather than taking time out of each of their days to learn the information.
When I study I try to use the pomodoro technique, which is much like you said, it is studying for 20-30 minute intervals with short breaks in between of 3-5 minutes. After 6 or 7 times of doing this I will take a longer break, about 30-45 minutes or so. This keeps your mind active so that trying to learn the information doesn’t become mechanical or unbearable. If you are interested in this technique you can read more about it at pomodorotechnique.com. I hope this helps and good luck with finals!

I thought that this post was interesting and made very valid points. Studying is a time consuming and often boring thing to do. However, we need to do it if we wish to have good grades. I agree with your point that making students do homework right when they get home from an eight hour school day is probably a bad idea. School is tiring and a lot of information is thrown at you during one school day. I remember being in middle and high school and the last thing that I wanted to do when I got home from school was homework. I think that a good time to do homework is during study halls if they are given during the day! I took advantage of these periods a lot during school and was able to get much work done while still in the mind-set of being at school and doing work.
We have more freedom during college and it is more of a personal choice to do homework or not to do homework, based on whether or not you want good grades. So, it takes a lot of motivation to sit down and study and get all of your work done. I definitely agree with you that a good time to do homework is after a light to moderate exercise. I love to get up early in the morning and go for a run or go to the weight room and then come back to shower and go to the library. Exercise gives me so much energy and prepares me for the rest of the day, so I do agree that it helps with studying. Listening to music is also a good way to get in the studying zone, for some people. I think that studying is very individualized, and like you said, some techniques work for some but not for others. Great post!!

I thought that this post was interesting and made very valid points. Studying is a time consuming and often boring thing to do. However, we need to do it if we wish to have good grades. I agree with your point that making students do homework right when they get home from an eight hour school day is probably a bad idea. School is tiring and a lot of information is thrown at you during one school day. I remember being in middle and high school and the last thing that I wanted to do when I got home from school was homework. I think that a good time to do homework is during study halls if they are given during the day! I took advantage of these periods a lot during school and was able to get much work done while still in the mind-set of being at school and doing work.
We have more freedom during college and it is more of a personal choice to do homework or not to do homework, based on whether or not you want good grades. So, it takes a lot of motivation to sit down and study and get all of your work done. I definitely agree with you that a good time to do homework is after a light to moderate exercise. I love to get up early in the morning and go for a run or go to the weight room and then come back to shower and go to the library. Exercise gives me so much energy and prepares me for the rest of the day, so I do agree that it helps with studying. Listening to music is also a good way to get in the studying zone, for some people. I think that studying is very individualized, and like you said, some techniques work for some but not for others. Great post!!

This information is very interesting to me. I take a lot of time out of my schedule to study. I obtain information in different ways. I've been hearing for years, from teachers and parents that studying alone in a quiet place is the best way to study; no distractions or interruptions. I've always felt that when I study with someone else, they help me understand the material better. They teach me how they memorize the material and how to understand it more effectively. Working with someone else does help me learn better sometimes. When it comes to exercising before, I think a little workout is a good idea to help you keep focus. Working out too hard can make an individual tired and have a hard time focusing. This blog is really interesting and contains many facts from the article to help prove the point. Good Job!!

This information is very interesting to me. I take a lot of time out of my schedule to study. I obtain information in different ways. I've been hearing for years, from teachers and parents that studying alone in a quiet place is the best way to study; no distractions or interruptions. I've always felt that when I study with someone else, they help me understand the material better. They teach me how they memorize the material and how to understand it more effectively. Working with someone else does help me learn better sometimes. When it comes to exercising before, I think a little workout is a good idea to help you keep focus. Working out too hard can make an individual tired and have a hard time focusing. This blog is really interesting and contains many facts from the article to help prove the point. Good Job!!

This article summary drew me in because I am currently a college student who has endured many studying habits. You are always kind of taught just to sit down and read your notes or go over notes and highlight different things. I definitely do not think this is extremely effective for me but I was always taught to study this way. In high school and recently I have heard of many new techniques about studying. For example, listening to music and taking breaks are good techniques. I actually went to the library and studied for my chemistry test for about an hour and a half then went to the gym. After the gym I began to study more outside with a friend for about 3 hours and then we took a walk. Later that night I studied a little bit before bed. My exam grade was a lot higher than my usual exam average. I believe that using a different technique than usual help me study and remember more for my exam.
I agree that more students at a younger age should be taught good study habits so when they are older college studying will come easier. Taking breaks after a long hard day of school is also very effective for students. When I would try doing homework after school I could not concentrate at all. When I came back to doing my homework later I was able to concentrate so much better and get my work done quicker.

Your post brings up really interesting arguments that I am able to relate to. I, myself, am a college Freshman in the Honor’s Program with a major in Nursing and a minor in Psychology. Being involved in all this is stressful in itself with the amount of homework and studying that has to be accomplished daily, however, once you add in all the other factors of your life like eating, hanging out with friends, extracurricular activities, and sleeping, getting everything done can be a complete hassle, and almost, at times, impossible. When I was much younger my parents would sit me down, and with their help, got me into the habit of completing all my homework at the kitchen table at 6:00 p.m. This was pretty easy to do, since I didn’t have much homework when I was younger, but as I got older and moved into High School getting all my homework done at 6:00 p.m. became a lot harder to accomplish. The times I would do my homework began to vary in High School, but I can honestly say that it was my parents that taught me to always set aside time every single day to do school work. I got so into this habit that even if I didn’t have any homework, I would take an hour or two out of my day to study, even if I didn’t have any test coming up. That resulted not only in always getting my homework done, but great grades on my tests. Now that I’m in college, I find myself doing homework every waking moment of the day. If it weren’t for my parents teaching me good study habits, I may not be succeeding as well as I am today. Over time my habits have changed a bit and they vary from day to day and class to class, but my parents helped me to set down the basics of good study habits, and from there I twisted them a little bit to fit me more. I agree when you say that parents shouldn’t force their kids to complete their homework right after school, but what’s the opinion of parents teaching kids good study habits? I can’t be the only student who learned directly from their parents on how to study well. I mean, how will students learn good study habits if their parents don’t teach them?

This post caught my eye because I am not very good at studying and it is one of the biggest things that I need to personally work harder on. I agree that everyone is different and have their own ways of studying and different methods that they prefer. I prefer being in a place with other people around me doing their work so that I feel motivated to do mine. If I just sat in a quiet room, I would not focus and would be on my phone the whole time. I personally feel like I never have enough time to study. I am on the Brockport Lacrosse team and I have practice for two hours a day and occasionally more than one session a day, along with games, classes, the gym and going to the dining hall, I get back to my room very late every night. By the end of my busy day, I am always exhausted and cannot keep my eyes open trying to study. I don’t get anything done until I realize that I’m cramming the night before a test. It is stressful to cram and I forget a lot of it during the test which means I am not learning what I am supposed to be learning. However, studying is very important and when I do have some time to study, I think frequent breaks keep my mind fresh and awake to do more studying. I often get up and walk around or get a snack to stay active. Sometimes working in groups or studying with a friend helps too. Good luck on finals!!

The title of this article really stuck out to me because as a college student, studying is typically on my brain a majority of the time. Studying is definitely not the most fun thing to do in the world, but after years of practice I think I’ve finally mastered the habits that work best for me. I completely agree with your points that studying styles differ for every person. We’re all unique individuals with different strengths, weaknesses, and interests- so why would anyone think that forcing us all to study identically would be beneficial for anyone? I know I study best at a desk in an empty room with an environment that has as little noise as possible. My twin sister, on the other hand, studies in an open room and is constantly listening to music as she works. Though this doesn’t make sense for me, it works for her. Our habits differ, but we both do well in school and find a way to use our strengths to help us in unique ways when it comes to our studies. This is a perfect testament to the fact that there’s no perfect black and white way to study. I also really liked how you brought up that many people in today’s society take studying and receiving an education for granted. I know for myself, often times when I get overwhelmed I sometimes wish I never had to deal with school in the first place. Your article reminds me however, how lucky we really are to even be discussing study habits, when many people all over the world wish this were one of their problems instead of facing issues such as poverty and hunger every day. Something I often hear people say when they’re studying is the oh so common, “when am I ever going to use this in real life anyways?” Your article, however, brings up a good point that we need to cherish every opportunity we have to learn, as education truly is a privilege. Overall, this is a great post!

I agree with this article because children have different studying habits. It is hard to concentrate after a long class or a few classes a day in college. Walking to class and hearing a teacher talking for a straight hour takes a toll on the body and mind. My parents always feel that in school that a person should be studying all day. In todays generation, kids socialize, play sports and have electronics. Back then in my mom and dad times, living in Jamaica, all they knew is studying. Their situation and my situation are totally different. On top of that my studying habits is different from others. My studying habits fit me but not my parents. This is what this blog is talking about. I also learned in psychology that there are three stages of memory: sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory. Sensory memory lasts up to 5 seconds. Short-term last to only 20 seconds and long term, can last up to decades. To get information into the brain it must be rehearsed. This means going over something, over and over, looking over it everyday so it doesn’t leave your mind.

I really found your article to be very interesting and eye catching because it is something I can really relate too. Growing up in my family my parents always believed that studying should be in a quiet room with no noise and that homework should be done as soon as you are assigned it. In high school this is no problem but in college workloads are much larger and getting it all done the day it is assigned is not an easy task. There are days that I am working on things last minute and I always get grilled for doing that but sometime when test and other assignments of higher priority some assignment will get pushed off later. My mother went to college and she always told me you have to study every day and complete all assignment way before they are due but I don’t think some release just how much school has changed since they have been in school and that it is not as easy as they think it is. I am the kind of person who studies with music or the TV on low, and I find it easier to focus because it helps negate all the other sounds around me. I find it very hard to study when it’s quiet or when I hear my family talking downstairs. Due to some of my experience I do believe that everyone has their own way of studying and that as long as it works well for them then parents and others should not judge them for their study methods or force them to change the way they study just because they think that it works better. Although I do believe that people have their own way of studying I also believe that there are some bad study methods. For one I think that the author is right on how cram sessions are not a good choice. There is just no way for all the study material to make it into your long term memory one day before the exam. Although it may have worked in high school, it does not work in college in that the material is more advance and covers material you have never learned before. I have experienced this in my first year of college and it is not a path that should be chosen as you will not pass classes by studying hours before an exam. I think the purpose of this article was to tell college student to find what works for them and to make good study choices. This was a great article to read especially for first Time College students. One thing I would like to see more of is study methods that did work for a lot of students, and what methods were found least helpful to help those entering college.

Being a college student myself, the title stood out to me. Who doesn't have a difficult time studying? I can so easily relate to JL in my methods of studying. Almost everything I do is last minute; procrastination has become one of my worst weaknesses. Studying doesn't happen till the night before of even a mere few hours before the actual exam. Blanking out during the test happens too often and all that information is lost the second that paper is handed in. While this is not an issue necessarily in study techniques, and more so an issue of time management, the study skills I found to be quite helpful. Parents always just want you to stay focused and get all your work done right away, but bringing up the point of the ability of the brain to focus for only so long hits hard. It makes a lot of sense and I wish I had thought of that excuse when I was in grade school, it could have definitely prevented a bunch of arguments and slammed doors. Back to the present however, I will be sure to try out some of the mentioned techniques in attempts to figure out what better works for me. Hiding out in the back of the library with my nose in notes and books hasn't been working out as successfully as you would think.

I enjoyed reading this article. It shows how the old ways of studying aren’t necessarily the best anymore. I think that parents forcing their children to finish their homework as soon as they get home has some advantages and disadvantages. One of the advantages would be that the material is still fresh in the students mind. Another advantage is that the student won’t put it off until the last moment. (Something I do constantly) But forcing a student to do work especially after spending hours at school doesn’t seem like a bright idea does it? I would agree with some of the tips given in the article. Taking periodic brakes, and finding a nice comfy spot where you think you will focus the most seem to be great ideas, something I might need to try sometime. I tend to put off my work and studying till the last moment. Trust me it doesn’t work, or have any positives about it. One thing that I do think helps me however, is listening to music. I even tend to listen to heavier music, but for some reason it locks me into my work and tends to make it go by with a pleasant feeling. Great article, and I am glad that there is research about this topic. (I need to learn some new tips!)

I was drawn right to this post because in my opinion I have the absolute worst studying habits and I'm sure most college students can say the same about themselves, I'm sure a lot of us do not study nearly as well as we should. Growing up, my parents also made us sit at the table and do our homework at a decent time but that never worked for me. I have learned that I study best when its late at night and I am comfortable in a place such as my bed. Most teachers and adults probably would say this is not effective but for me I truly believe that it is. Where and when students study best is different between all of them. Teachers should not e telling us there is a right and wrong way to do it. They should take into account that everyone works and learns differently.

I was drawn right to this post because in my opinion I have the absolute worst studying habits and I'm sure most college students can say the same about themselves, I'm sure a lot of us do not study nearly as well as we should. Growing up, my parents also made us sit at the table and do our homework at a decent time but that never worked for me. I have learned that I study best when its late at night and I am comfortable in a place such as my bed. Most teachers and adults probably would say this is not effective but for me I truly believe that it is. Where and when students study best is different between all of them. Teachers should not e telling us there is a right and wrong way to do it. They should take into account that everyone works and learns differently.

I was drawn right to this post because in my opinion I have the absolute worst studying habits and I'm sure most college students can say the same about themselves, I'm sure a lot of us do not study nearly as well as we should. Growing up, my parents also made us sit at the table and do our homework at a decent time but that never worked for me. I have learned that I study best when its late at night and I am comfortable in a place such as my bed. Most teachers and adults probably would say this is not effective but for me I truly believe that it is. Where and when students study best is different between all of them. Teachers should not e telling us there is a right and wrong way to do it. They should take into account that everyone works and learns differently.

I really enjoyed this whole article, but especially the last paragraph in particular. I myself am a cram studier and I do not have the best study habits. Although I have the desire to do well in school, I often find a lack of motivation to put in the time and effort and I completely take responsibility. In my APUSH class in high school, we watched a documentary about different study habits around the world, and kids in China, India, and America were studied. The kids in India and China put in double the time, in school and on their own on their academics and they still didn't receive half the opportunities average American students do. This really put into perspective how much I take school for granted. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to participate in an exchange program with a school in Germany, and their school system is much more tedious and efficient, and their students all immediately went home and completed their homework directly after school. Just based off this knowledge alone, I wonder if these bad study habits are solely a problem with American students.

In agreement with several others on here, well done! Your information was highly relatable and relevant to the current time period we live in, which made this a very interesting and enlightening piece to read. There is no one right way to study, and i totally agree that it varies by person. I have friends who can blast music loudly and still hammer out a paper, meanwhile I can't type a simple email without hopping between tabs on my computer which turns into an all day surf fest. Parents should at least overview their children's study habits, but only if those habits are failing them. If the habits are paying off despite going against the traditional style, then there no reason to change it. Students should be more diligent in their studies, but if their habits are paying off academically, then there is no reason to toy or force change.

In agreement with several others on here, well done! Your information was highly relatable and relevant to the current time period we live in, which made this a very interesting and enlightening piece to read. There is no one right way to study, and i totally agree that it varies by person. I have friends who can blast music loudly and still hammer out a paper, meanwhile I can't type a simple email without hopping between tabs on my computer which turns into an all day surf fest. Parents should at least overview their children's study habits, but only if those habits are failing them. If the habits are paying off despite going against the traditional style, then there no reason to change it. Students should be more diligent in their studies, but if their habits are paying off academically, then there is no reason to toy or force change.

This is a compelling post because I had never thought about the aspects and different types of studying growing up. I just kind of went at it. I like this post because it points out that there are different types of ways to study for different people. Growing up, I was always taught to get my homework done when I get home from school, and then I would have the rest of the evening to do as I please. This especially worked for me because I would have sport practices at 6 or 7 o’clock at night, and this would ensure that I could get everything done on time. This was not the case for my sister. My sister has always had a problem focusing and has recently been diagnosed with ADHD. For her, sitting down right after school was difficult because she had been doing so for the past 8 hours. The music would help her study as well, but this could also be a distraction for her like you wrote in your post. As you said, it pretty much comes down to the type of person that you are, and what works best for you. I would like to see you take this post farther to see what other research has been done for the methods of studying to possibly bring in some analytical and numerical data as well. You could also take this into the direction of offering other methods of studying as well. Overall I enjoyed this post and I could definitely connect everything you had been saying to sister and myself.

The title drew me in because I'm still looking for new studying tips. When I was little, my parents made me do my homework as soon as I got home. I couldn't go outside or play with toys until I got it done. For a couple years it worked out well, like in first and second grade. I would have one math worksheet and one phonics worksheet. The worksheets were simple, so I got them done fast. However, once I got older, like in fifth grade, the tactic of getting my homework done right after school just wasn't working. I was too tired from school. Like the author of the post said, students can lose concentration and are tired after going to school for six hours. That was me. The classes were harder, and we had more homework and studying, in other subjects, as well as math. I think as kids, along with myself, grow up, we adapt our own ways to study and do homework. I wish I could just get my homework done right when I get back to my dorm after classes, but I cant. I usually relax or hang out with my friends for a little bit, then eat. I learned that I work more efficient at night. Students should figure out what works best for them.

The title drew me in because I'm still looking for new studying tips. When I was little, my parents made me do my homework as soon as I got home. I couldn't go outside or play with toys until I got it done. For a couple years it worked out well, like in first and second grade. I would have one math worksheet and one phonics worksheet. The worksheets were simple, so I got them done fast. However, once I got older, like in fifth grade, the tactic of getting my homework done right after school just wasn't working. I was too tired from school. Like the author of the post said, students can lose concentration and are tired after going to school for six hours. That was me. The classes were harder, and we had more homework and studying, in other subjects, as well as math. I think as kids, along with myself, grow up, we adapt our own ways to study and do homework. I wish I could just get my homework done right when I get back to my dorm after classes, but I cant. I usually relax or hang out with my friends for a little bit, then eat. I learned that I work more efficient at night. Students should figure out what works best for them.

I have to agree, I am not much of a person to use the normal ways of studying. I agree with the two study habits that include finding your own study spots, and listening to music. I can study around a lot of loud noise for some assignments, and be unable to study in quiet secluded spaces, and vis versa. It all depends on the work I have to do. Another thing that was looked at as odd to my parents was how I was able to study or do homework with music. I too disagree with parents forcing their kids to study right after school and I think they should be able to take a little break before hitting the books. One thing I do not agree with is doing some sort of physical activity for a little before doing work at home. This may be because it has never worked for me though. Every time I would do something active before homework, I find myself still wired and distracted easily. This is just me though, and I understand it could be different from others. Overall, I fought this was a good post though with lots of good points!

I have to agree, I am not much of a person to use the normal ways of studying. I agree with the two study habits that include finding your own study spots, and listening to music. I can study around a lot of loud noise for some assignments, and be unable to study in quiet secluded spaces, and vis versa. It all depends on the work I have to do. Another thing that was looked at as odd to my parents was how I was able to study or do homework with music. I too disagree with parents forcing their kids to study right after school and I think they should be able to take a little break before hitting the books. One thing I do not agree with is doing some sort of physical activity for a little before doing work at home. This may be because it has never worked for me though. Every time I would do something active before homework, I find myself still wired and distracted easily. This is just me though, and I understand it could be different from others. Overall, I fought this was a good post though with lots of good points!

Your post got my attention, because study habits are such a big concern in high school and college with teachers and parents. They don't understand though, like you said, that everyone is different and learns differently. i have been in many classes in which the teacher explains the "right way" to study, but not everyone in the class will have the best result when using that technique because everyone obtains information differently. I have great inter sent in this topic because i was always scolded for my study habits, such as sitting as far away from people as possible and also listening to music. High school especially was hard because teachers made you sit in certain places and music was not always allowed to block out the surrounding noise. I think people should study ow they please, because there is no right or wrong way to study.

This is a tough topic for me to take a specific stance on. On one hand, as a parent, you don’t want your children to develop lazy or “bad” study habits in their upbringings but, on the other hand, you also wouldn’t want to hound them and force things upon them as it is crucial that they become free thinking adults and learn to figure things out on their own. I guess I would have to say that a happy-medium must be reached in order for good things to come about here. I think my parents did everything right as, in my own experiences, they never hounded me about doing my homework at specific times or anything like that but they were successful in stressing the sheer importance of doing well in school. My Dad would always tell me how school is my job and I should treat it like one. This allowed me to develop the drive that I have today even though my parents were not at all oppressive and were quite laissez-faire when it came to my in-school performance through the years. Anyways, I really liked your post and everything you did with it! Hopefully we can all find that happy-medium when we’re parents someday!

This is a tough topic for me to take a specific stance on. On one hand, as a parent, you don’t want your children to develop lazy or “bad” study habits in their upbringings but, on the other hand, you also wouldn’t want to hound them and force things upon them as it is crucial that they become free thinking adults and learn to figure things out on their own. I guess I would have to say that a happy-medium must be reached in order for good things to come about here. I think my parents did everything right as, in my own experiences, they never hounded me about doing my homework at specific times or anything like that but they were successful in stressing the sheer importance of doing well in school. My Dad would always tell me how school is my job and I should treat it like one. This allowed me to develop the drive that I have today even though my parents were not at all oppressive and were quite laissez-faire when it came to my in-school performance through the years. Anyways, I really liked your post and everything you did with it! Hopefully we can all find that happy-medium when we’re parents someday!

This is a tough topic for me to take a specific stance on. On one hand, as a parent, you don’t want your children to develop lazy or “bad” study habits in their upbringings but, on the other hand, you also wouldn’t want to hound them and force things upon them as it is crucial that they become free thinking adults and learn to figure things out on their own. I guess I would have to say that a happy-medium must be reached in order for good things to come about here. I think my parents did everything right as, in my own experiences, they never hounded me about doing my homework at specific times or anything like that but they were successful in stressing the sheer importance of doing well in school. My Dad would always tell me how school is my job and I should treat it like one. This allowed me to develop the drive that I have today even though my parents were not at all oppressive and were quite laissez-faire when it came to my in-school performance through the years. Anyways, I really liked your post and everything you did with it! Hopefully we can all find that happy-medium when we’re parents someday!

You’ve made some good points in this article. You also provided me with more information about the studying habits. I’ve noticed that it’s extremely hard to concentrate when I try to do work right after class. Next time I’ll try exercising beforehand to see if it changes the way I focus while doing work. I also noticed that it is really important to find a good studying area. I love being in a quite area where there is a minimum amount of people. Yes, studying and doing homework is super boring, that’s way I need to be away from people while I do my work or else I’ll be paying attention to my friends rather than my work. I really enjoyed reading this article because it provided me with a new insight on how to prepare to do my work. This article also provided me with new and helpful information that I can pass on to my friends and others if they are having the same issues as I do when I need to study.

As a college student, I could not agree more that studying habits vary per person. Personally, I do not study as often as I should to really know what works best for me. I procrastinate and am usually all over the place when I finally get around to studying. In my high school days, studying was not really an option for me because I would have school, then sports practice right after and by the time I got home, I would be way too tired to accomplish any work. This would occur every day, so work would keep getting pushed back and build up on me. And because of my schedule, the end result would always be cramming not only the night before, but also minutes before a test. My parents being busy people themselves also knew what I was going through and were able to provide a lot of advice for studying. They kept on me about having a planner which made life so much easier for studying and just managing my schedule as a whole. I really enjoyed the article and it makes me feel good that someone else can share in the struggle of study habits with me.

I can relate a lot while reading this because studying has never come easy to me. After reading this I may try a few new things. I usually thought studying is just making flash cards and sitting there being bored out of your mind. I never was forced to sit down straight after school to do homework so I don't know what it is like. From my experience, I did best on my homework after I relaxed from school. This relaxing included stuffing my face with any foods, Exercising outside, and sitting down for a bit. That is when I would usually did my homework and it was an okay system. I do wish I had a higher drive to study, but I just never found that I needed to. I am still waiting for my rude awakening in college, but until then I will be trying to improve my studying habits.

According to the New Jersey Institute of Technology, students who studied with music playing had lower average tests scores than those who didn’t. However the scores also varied depending on whether the student routinely played music while studying and by the type of music played. That being said, i believe everyone is different and choosing to study for ones own reasons and doing it they way one believes it will be the most affective is usually the most affective. People who choose to listen to music because they believe it will help them, are the students who do it the most and have statistically better grades, than those who simply put music on, so as to more enjoy studying. As you said education is something that many citizens of developed countries take for granted and it is not as appreciated as it should be. That being said over studying can be very detrimental to mental health. Over studying and constantly stressing about ones studies can lead to massive amounts of anxiety. While education is something we should be grateful to have, it is important that we study in ways which are not causing negative side affects to hour mental health. It is important that one studies because one wants to, for ones self. It is also important that one learns the most affective way to study for ones self. We are all individuals and must learn to study better, more healthily and be more appreciative of our opportunity to to so.

I personally 100% agree with this article. I believe studying is different from a person to another. For example, in my case, I just need music to be able to study. If I'm alone, without music, I get bored after two minutes, I'm unable to concentrate, and I pretty much fall asleep. I also don't mind distractions in the background, but I know for a fact that some people need absolute silence, or to be alone in their room with no sounds to be able to study properly. There's no right way to study, everybody has a different way of studying like everybody has a different favorite meal. No'one should be forced to study a certain way, if they're not confortable to study in those conditions. Everybody's different.

I was attracted by the title because, as a college student, I would like to see what's others opinion on the study in college. When I finish reading this article, I felt inspired and I do think that what you proposed helps parents to understand nowadays' students' pressure. Especially, the tips that had been mentioned in the article are really helpful for students to improve their working status. Yet, I still believe that study is just like the training for our brain, and the only way to enlarge our knowledge and to ameliorate our study progress is to keep practicing and to keep working as long as you can. In fact, study and weight training have the same concept which is to get more, you have to work more. In order to gain muscles, people in the gym tend to push their limit and do as much as they can. By the same token, students need to practice more, to read more, for the purpose of understanding more.

The ethical issue I found is that should school or teachers give students more time or less work so that student can really absorb what they learned? Just like you mentioned in the article, "...forgetting almost everything right after the test.", if students do not possess enough time to finish their work or to study for that one particular class, the result would usually be students trying to finish their work or their study the night before the test or the assignment is due. While students complain about how little time they have, teachers would feel wronged, because they think they give a reasonable time.

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JL