Science: History and Method

Heritage College
by clandon on February 3, 2014
The New York Times Bee Deaths May Stem From Virus, Study Says

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Heritage College
by zlance on January 29, 2014
   In an article written by Evelyn Boychuk, Sea Anemones Found Living Beneath Antarctic Ice Shelf the author reports about a new species that have been found living under different ice shelves in Antarctica. A research team from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, after drilling through the Antarctic ice, they noticed that the ice was fuzzy. Once they removed more equipment they noticed anemones swimming around the top of the water. This became a shock to the researchers as they did not know that anemones could survive in such freezing water.

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Heritage College
by alanarep on January 29, 2014
Alana Repstock Leslie Elliot Science: History and Methodology January 29th, 2013 What Constitutes Gluten Intolerance? The article “Does gluten sensitivity in the absence of coeliac disease exist?” written by authors Imran Aziz, Marios Hadjivassiliou, and David S Sanders explores the recent phenomenon of increased cases of gluten intolerance and the coinciding rise in demand for gluten free diets.

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Heritage College
by Gangster_of_Love on January 29, 2014
“New Truths that Only One Can See”, written by George Johnson and published in the New York Times in January 2014, questions the integrity and falsifiability of modern scientific publications. Successful replication of a given experiment is the highest standard for declaring a hypothesis true. However, recent findings, namely by researcher Dr. John P. A. Ioannidis, show an unusual and unacceptable amount of false findings that managed to evade refutation through certain biases and corruptions.

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Heritage College
by Ebby on January 29, 2014
The New York Times China Exports Pollution to U.S., Study Finds By Edward Wong January 20th, 2014 http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/21/world/asia/china-also-exports-pollution-to-western-us-study-finds.html

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Heritage College
by Miriam S. on January 29, 2014
            An article titled “E-whiskers: Highly sensitive tactile sensors developed for robotics and other applications" by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was published on Science Daily on January 21st 2014. This article discusses the potential benefits of using extremely sensitive, mechanical whiskers as a means to better understand certain environments.  This idea is taken from the hypothesis that whiskers on animals, such as cats, are extremely sensitive, and that similarly the mechanical whiskers could be used to create better sensors.

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Heritage College
by Miriam S. on January 29, 2014
            An article titled “E-whiskers: Highly sensitive tactile sensors developed for robotics and other applications" by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was published on Science Daily on January 21st 2014. This article discusses the potential benefits of using extremely sensitive, mechanical whiskers as a means to better understand certain environments.  This idea is taken from the hypothesis that whiskers on animals, such as cats, are extremely sensitive, and that similarly the mechanical whiskers could be used to create better sensors.

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Heritage College
by TiresiasOfThebes on January 29, 2014
          There has been a new invention recently in the USA. Some researchers from the Virginia Technology College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have created a new kind of battery: a sugar battery. The sugar-powered battery could replace the traditional lithium-ion batteries that have been used for decades. The scientists who created it claim that this new technology can store 10 times more energy than traditional equivalent size batteries found in smartphones. Moreover, the sugar batteries are cheaper, refillable and environment friendly, as they are biodegradable.

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Heritage College
by ewoodley on January 29, 2014
In a BBC article published on January 22nd, Jonathan Amos discusses new findings in the scientific journal “Nature”. The asteroid Ceres has been discovered to spew water vapour into space. Relatively little is known about the dwarf planet, but a 2013 study using the Herschel telescope revealed that 6kg of water vapour is emitted from the surface of Ceres every second.

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Heritage College
by Matthew.Lafleur on January 29, 2014
Matthew Lafleur Leslie Elliot Science: History and Methodology January 22nd, 2014 Science Article!

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Heritage College
by SCook on January 29, 2014
Astronomers have discovered three planets in the star cluster of Messier 67. The Planets were discovered in an, open cluster, type of star cluster. An open cluster is a group of stars formed a cloud of gas and dust. Planetary discoveries outside of our solar system are common. In fact, it is said that over one thousand planets have already been discovered. However, what is so special about these three planets is that they are in a star cluster. This phenomenon is rare and only a few planets within star cluster have been found.

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Heritage College
by dlacroix2 on January 29, 2014
This article talks about Ceres, a large asteroid which is technically a dwarf planet, which gives off large amounts of water vapour into space. Ceres measures 950km across, and is located 2.7 AU away from the sun in the asteroid belt. Ceres has been seen releasing a large amount of water vapour, around 21 tonnes of it every hour. A planetary scientist named Michael Küppers suggested that asteroids along with comets might be responsible for the source of water on Earth. The vapour expelled from Ceres is largely lost in space, with only around 20% falling back on Ceres.

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Heritage College
by RTurnbull on January 29, 2014
Kenneth Chang's article, The Final Frontier’s Financial Limits (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/21/science/space/the-final-frontiers-financial-limits.html?ref=science&_r=0), talks about the future of N.A.S.A.'s budget concerning planetary exploration and space exploration.

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Heritage College
by mbertrand on January 29, 2014
This article highlights aspects of hacking websites, notable distributed denial of service attacks (DDOS attacks) and protections against them. The technology in question, Shape Shifter, is what is called a ‘botwall’ which stops hackers from making DDOS attacks by scrambling the web application code. This effectively makes the hackers incapable of making an attack against a single source as the source is constantly changing.

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Reply to: Gang Rape in India
5 years 9 months ago

I think this is a very important subject to raise awareness about. Although safety can be an issue in every part of the world India proves to have a much more profound problem at hand. Women should in no circumstances have to feel scared to ride a public bus. For me these occurrences seem so unbelievable and outrageous to be happening in our current age. The complete violation of not only laws but of freedom is incomprehensible. I definitely believe, like what has been stated, that the enforcement of laws will only occur with pressure. This pressure needs to come from not only India but the world. Protests from men and women are necessary to turn this issue in India into a world issue that must be changed.

5 years 9 months ago

I agree with you. I believe that Venezuela has a great economic opportunity on their hands. If they could discover a way to extract the oil in the soil, they would be able to vastly improve their economy. Until they do however, I believe that they will unfortunately continue to struggle.

5 years 9 months ago

On the question of whether companies should play as dirty as the hackers who hack them, I agree with you. Hackers, botters, etc do not follow the rules that have been placed around the company (primarily gaming companies). This exploits the games which honest people play and succeed at, and all the prevention into hacking these games would greatly increase the players devotion to the company. On more of a corporate level, hacking is used to get client information the majority of the time. But with the development of DDOS attack blockers, hackers will always find newer and newer ways of obtaining their goal in hacking companies.

5 years 9 months ago

I entirely agree with what you have to say. This is the 21st century and homophobia should be about as accepted as segregated bathrooms…but it’s not. In fact, it’s not only homophobic people who are striking out at Macklemore either. I recently read an article in which a queer woman was trashing the rapper for promoting assimilation rather than acceptance. That bothered me almost (note the almost) as much as homophobic comments. Macklemore has good intentions. That woman was raging over someone who was promoting the same anti-homophobic message she was. Maybe she wasn’t 100% in agreement with his methods but at least he is getting attention. One step at a time woman!

Reply to: Monsanto the Great
5 years 9 months ago

While I would agree that Monsanto's bad reputation for dominating the global food market can account for some of our general aversion and dislike for GMO products, I think that it also has to do with the unknown long-term health risks of consuming such genetically modified goods. A study performed on rats showed that those who were fed genetically modified corn were more likely to develop tumours and die prematurely. <>

Can you imagine the long-term health risks that consuming these products would have on humans, if rats developed tumours over such a short period of time? GMO products certainly pose a threat to our global health and economic standing.

5 years 9 months ago

The title was well chosen, it immediately caught my attention. The topic is relevant because the environment is a growing issue. Informative and interesting.

5 years 9 months ago

Very informative, interesting and gave me a bit more insight into DDOS attacks and how to prevent them. However, by mimicking the actions of these hackers and protecting from attacks in the same manner, doesn't that enable the company, or at least maybe people within the company, to perform their own attacks independent of the company but still using the servers? Also, wouldn't companies be able to target opposition in this way and still remain hidden? This is just speculation by me with limited knowledge of DDOS attacks and so forth, so it's merely an idea.

5 years 9 months ago

I completely agree with what you wrote in this article. Like you said many teenagers own a smart phone or laptop but that is only because the parent bought them that device. I have even seen a 4th grader with a more advanced phone than my own. I know that the kid did not pay for a 500$ phone on his own and is also not paying for the monthly usage fee of 50$. His parents bought that device for him assuming that there would be no problem. If parents truly want to restrict the exchange of information over the internet than they will teach their children about internet safety before they give the device to their children.

5 years 9 months ago

I enjoyed reading your blog post and I find that you present the situation without any bias very well. I also believe it is hard to choose a definite side on the topic of reviving extinct species. On a certain level I do agree with you and favour the rival of extinct spices because it would be really interesting and would mark advancement in the scientific world. We favour such experimentation to happen because we feel as though it would be cool to see. However, when thinking about the animal itself, perhaps bringing them back is not the best idea. As you mentioned scientist such as Sir Ian Wilmust are against the revival of extinct species because the animal would be lonely. I feel we are obliged to think of the animal first before our personal interests and desires. Therefore, even though I believe it would be interesting to revive them, it is better that we do not.

5 years 9 months ago

I find that lately video games have been used as a form of scapegoat for sensationalism following tragedies or criminal activities (be they school shootings, murders, assaults or increases other forms of crime) as well as detrimental social adjustment. What struck me as odd regarding this particular article is that they do not really go into what sort of games were tested on the subjects as well as the social backgrounds of the tested subjects. Such biases are unintentional but still exist, as does the nature of the survey, which may lead to a bias of non-volunteering. To counter act my previous point however, is that games have ratings up to an 18+ rating on at least two different scales (PEGI and ESRB), and I know that the ESRB mentions what is contained in each game for gamers under the rating age, so it is up to the parent to mediate based on those ratings what kind of games theirs child would be playing.

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