Race and Racism Group 546 (Fall 2015)

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by MikeRomito on December 7, 2015
This article written by Melissa Chan on October 3rd 2015 entitled “Mass. high school students suspended over racist texts mocking black class president” is about 6 students from a Massachusetts high school making racial remarks about their newly elected black senior class president. The students used many racial remarks in a group chat referring to the elected president. The students even made a petition on a website to remove him as president, the petition stated, “He shouldn’t be president, impeach him, and imagine him doing your graduation speech”.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by melissa on October 21, 2015
On June 11, 2014, a journalist published an article entitled "Torrence Collier, 11, says he faces racism, extreme bullying in Westport" that was published on the CBC News. The author demonstrates how much children can be cruel against somebody else. A little boy, Torrence Collier, is victim of racism and bullying. The Collier's family has recently moved back in Westport from Saskatchewan. In his new school and in his village, Torrence is the only black child on a population of 200. He is in grade 5 and he already feels rejection. He does not understand why nobody loves him.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by kessmcrae on October 20, 2015
Kess McRae Monday, October 19, 2015 Summary #2  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by ABurnett on October 19, 2015
On October 16th, New York Times writer Bernadette Lim took apart microaggressive Asian stereotypes found in mainstream culture with her insightful article, "Model Minority" Seems Like a Compliment, but It Does Great Harm. Lim discusses how seemingly positive stereotypes such as always working hard and 'being better at math' actually causes more harm than good to Asian-American people.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Vanessa Ex on October 19, 2015
The article “ It’s My Job to Raise Children Who Are Not Only Not Racist But Actively Anti-Racist “ published on the first of July 2015 and written by Mandy Hitchcock illustrates an aspect of racism in society from a different point of view due to the fact that she is a White mother of a four year old White son. The author demonstrates various facts in order to emphases the problem of racism in the United States.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Alex Castro on October 19, 2015
       “NBA bans LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life over racist comments” is a Sports article published by Jon Swaine in The Guardian on April 29th, 2014. The article is an informative piece explaining the aftermath of comments made by Donald Sterling in regard to the skin color of individuals Sterling’s mistress was accompanying to LA Clippers basketball games.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by d.iwanzwich on October 19, 2015
The article "Black Model Nykhor Paul Is 'Tired Of Apologizing For [Her] Blackness' posted by Julee Wilson on August 17th 2015 to Huffington Post Canada centers around the idea of racism in the fashion industry. South Sudanese model Nykhor Paul's Instagram post is referenced, where she expresses her annoyance of professional makeup/hair stylists not being prepared to deal with a black girl by not having the right color makeup or never having practiced with dark hair textures.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by ClarissaB on October 19, 2015
            The article ''I Have the Big Job of Teaching My Black Children About Police'' written by Rachel Garlinghouse on January 5th, 2015 in The Huffington Post describes a very appalling reality faced by many caretakers of dark-skinned children. The author, a mother of three girls, gives us insight on her experience in having to raise dark-skinned children and the struggle she will face when she must explain that police will not always be who they imagine they are.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by camelia.bouthillier on October 19, 2015
                In the article “5 Facts Explaining America’s Enduring Racial Divide” by Ian Bremmer published June 29th 2015 in Time Inc., it is understood that for my people of color, America is divided in two; a racial divide that has been going on for centuries. According to the comparison of various statistics around the world, black America struggles to meet the goal of equality. Bremmer blames 5 different factors for such a divide; education, wealth, health, incarceration and violence.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by maithaixox on October 19, 2015
            In the article “Oprah Winfrey and the Handbag She Couldn’t Have” published in the New York Times on August 9th 2015 by Christine Hauser, the author states that Oprah wanted to go to a luxurious store to buy this very expensive handbag. The brand of the handbag was Tom Ford with real crocodile skin and it approximately costs about 38 thousand dollars. As soon as she walked into the store, she had her eyes set on that handbag and so she asked the employee if she could see it and hold it.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by LiaM on October 19, 2015
In the article entitled “How Racism is Hurting Our Nation's Foster Children”, (Huffington Post, October 15, 2015), DaShanne Stokes discusses how racism is currently scarring the lives of over 400 000 American children who are in foster care. According to the Administration for Children and Families, over 50% of the children entering foster care systems in 2013 were of color. African American children are being taken from their families and put into foster care more frequently than Caucasian children.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Michelle on October 19, 2015
In the article ‘’Talking About Racism With White Kids’’ written by KJ Dell’antonia in the New York Times in 2014, the author discusses the fact that white parents have to talk about races with their white children. She argues how difficult talking about race with kids is: there are so many things to tell, and after the parent have many questions. Did they explain it well enough? Was it clear? Dell’antonia, after talking about race with her son, was full of worries-had she done it clear enough and good enough?

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by chloe langlois on October 19, 2015
In Nathan Robinson's article “Schumer's unfortunate ‘Train wreck’ lesson: Amy's casual racism isn't one of her bad habits to overcome” published on salon.com in 2015, the actress and  mostly comedian Amy Schumer is said to defend herself for her racist comments found within the movie she wrote and stars in. Robinson explains how the comedian wanted her characters to be racist but that they never actually cross the line of what is considered wrong. Furthermore, the author explains that although Schumer's intentions may not be bad, the audience is still enjoying and laughing at racist jokes.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by conor on October 19, 2015
              In this article, “Moncton Food Truck Owner Says he Faces             Daily Racism” by Alexandra Abdelwahab, published on August 7th, 2015 on Global News about a man who operates his own food truck in Moncton New Brunswick. In this article she depicts the fact that Michael Uberall (Owner), faces racism because he is born in Germany and displays his countries name on his food truck. It has gone far enough as people calling him a Nazi simply because he was born in Germany; however he has lived in Moncton for a while now.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by CelineG on October 19, 2015
Katie Rogers wrote for The New-York Times an article entitled “Rihanna Defended Rachel Dolezal, the White Woman Who Claimed to Be Black” which was published on October 6th 2015. The article begins by explaining that Rihanna had given an interview to Vanity Fair on the subject of her relationships and her experience being in a abusive relationship with ex, Chris Brown. However, in the interview, they got to discussing race and Rachel Dolezal. She explains that Dolezal was at the center of media attention this summer for, as she puts it, “appropriating black culture”.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by tcicconi on October 19, 2015
Part A) Summary.                                                                                                    

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by vanessa on October 19, 2015
In June of 2015, Julianna McDermott posted the shocking article titled as “Girl Told She Shouldn’t Dress As Elsa ‘Because she’s black’ Recieves Outpouring Of Support”. Rachel Muir, an Australian aboriginal, and her daughter Samara attended a Disney-themed event at a shopping center in Melbourne. Samara dressed up as her favorite Disney princess Elsa, in excitement for the event.

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3 years 6 months ago

Your childhood is crucial period in your life. During this period, you are learning and making sense of the world around more and more every day. If, as a child, you are surround by brutal violence, it becomes the norm. As Emmanuel said, he saw people die right in front of his eyes and did not even cry. This violence, in a sense, becomes a part of you. Children exposed to violence can learn to express their emotions in that same form of aggression and they can easily be brain washed into thinking the same violent thoughts that their elders have. These repercussions will surely have a negative influence on that person later on in their adulthood. They may unfortunately live their entire lives in a violent manner, or perhaps with the help of education, some day come to the realization that life is not suppose to be lived this way, and that violence is never the answer.

3 years 6 months ago

In my opinion, I do agree with the Emmanuel's view on music which is that it can change your perception of your surrounding and can help up though rough times. When I listen to music, it transports me to another world according to the atmosphere of song. Thus, it is easy for me to comprehend that an individual going through rough times turns towards music to make them forget or get through this difficult time in their life. Music is like a marriage, it is with you through the good and the worst.

3 years 6 months ago

Based on Emmanuel Jal's TED Talk and your own opinion, what is a war child? How do their lives differ from typical North American children?

3 years 6 months ago

Why do you think it is important for media to portray events, such as the image of war, in the most truthful way possible?

3 years 6 months ago

No, I personally do not think that violence should be responded to with more violence. As the saying goes; two wrongs do not make a right. I do not think that Bush addressed and went about handling the terrorist attack on 9/11 in the correct manner. Osama Bin Ladin’s objective was to start a war with America; if the American government decided to respond in a non-violent manner, and did not declare war, perhaps this conflict would have never blown up to such a large extent. Responding in a violent manner simply leads to more civilian casualties, more terror, more anger, and a longer battle. War does not resolve anything. We need to find a way of addressing and dealing with disputes without the use of guns and bombs in order to actually overcome the disagreement at hand.

3 years 8 months ago

Hey, first of all, this outline is pretty good as it's clear & concise, which makes it really to understand your main points.

The fact that you decided to focus mainly on the province of Quebec is pretty brave on your part, mainly because it makes finding proper information a lot harder than it would be for a country such as the United States, especially considering you are looking for an overall history (20th century and on) of unemployment. When it comes to finding solutions to this issue, I suggest that you look at other countries' solutions to solving Quebec's unemployment issues. I also like the fact that you're focusing on the effects of unemployment on people; it is a perspective that is not often looked upon when talking about this subject. All in all I think you know very well what you're doing on this paper.

3 years 10 months ago

I have decided to comment on your post because the foster care system has always interested me. Although I am only an 18 year old, I have always strongly considered the fact that one day I will take care of a child who is in need by either adopting or fostering. Somewhere deep down I always knew that there were more children of colour in those facilities but I did not think the case was as bad as you say. I definitely agree with every single one of your statements. It is really cruel towards innocent children who want nothing but love and to be helped. What gives the people in charge of the foster care system the right to deny the children of what they might need? Helping the minority children can change their whole world, as they would eventually end up with a family. As it is mentioned in Erin N. Winkler’s article called “Children are not colourblind: How young children learn race”, children do notice the different skin tones and make their on judgments based on what they observe. As you said, the children will most probably notice that they have been there longer than the Caucasian ones and will eventually make the connection that it is because of their skin colour as the other minority children who are also ignored are in the same situation. Isn’t there someone who is in charge of keeping an eye on these types of systems? Someone should report this for the sake of all those children. I wonder what the children would say if we had the chance to ask them ourselves about how they feel they are treated compared to the other children.

3 years 10 months ago

Your title immediately caught my attention, and I was glad that I choose to read your article since it is a scientific founding I was not aware of. It is an interesting subject, containing its dose of controversy nonetheless. I was glad to see your opinion on the issue since I completely agree with you. Honestly, as I began to read, I thought what the research proclaimed seemed logical, but I too found it dangerously close to being a simple excuse to commit acts of racism.
I like how you also interpret the viewers’ thoughts, that simply because it is said by researchers then it must be the truth. Unfortunately, I believe people do take the time or care to verify the information they receive. However, as you said, this “discovery” is for many people an easy way out of the guilt they must feel for acting in discriminatory manners, which is why they accept it so easily, and do not take time to reflect upon it.
This issue reminds me of the concept of scientific racism, which we have discussed in class, and in which racism can be “justified” by scientific reasoning. Hopefully, we will learn from our past mistakes, and instead use reason to guide our decisions. In contrast, I hope since we discard so easily scientific founding that “justifies” racism, we will not jump the gun on further evidence found against racism.

3 years 10 months ago

I chose to comment on this article because I was outraged by how people treated this innocent young Muslim boy. I agree with Lucas in how appalling his arrest was. This means faculty and police seriously believed he had constructed a bomb with the knowledge of a 14 year old. I believe this story will only add fuel to the flames that is stereotypes. The stereotypes were already prevalent but the spotlight of this news story will only reinforce the existing stereotypes offering yet another reason for people to be Islamophobic. I hope Ahmed isn't discouraged by what happened because it would be such a waste of raw talent. I can relate to being stereotyped against based on my race. It is devastating to a young mind and I hope this young man is compensated for what happened to him. Despite what happened, their reaction is only fair as around the time, terrorists acts in the United States were increasingly prevalent. What can their government implement to decrease this fear of terrorism as well as a this inherent Islamophobia?

3 years 10 months ago

I choose to comment on your submission because of the mysterious title, I think that the author and yourself make a fantastic point that the police treat racial minorities the way they do simply because they are reflecting societies attitudes towards crime. It had never occurred to me that society is partly at fault for the treatment of these innocent black men being killed. I completely agree with you when you say that we need to take a good long look in the mirror when we question why all of these social issues arise in our communities. Thinking on what you argue reminds me of new racism and even democratic racism because oftentimes people think they are such peaceful, equality loving people. However in reality, add to stereotypes and negative feelings towards minorities, without them or others realizing the racist undertone of their beliefs and comments. To conclude, like you said we should all look in the mirror to see if perhaps the person looking back is actually a part of the problem. If so, we need to realize the true meaning of racist and how to stop it at its roots, because we are the solution.

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