Race and Racism 544 Fall 2014 (A. Nouvet)

About this class

Champlain College, Fall 2014

This course will introduce students to the concept of race from the perspective of biological and cultural anthropology. The first part of the course focuses on the distribution of human biological variation and compares this variation to contemporary ideas about race. The second part traces the historical development of the concept of race, the role that slavery, colonialism and science have played in the dissemination of the belief in race, as well as modern ideas of race. The third part of the course will explore the reality of racism through case studies from various countries, with a focus on Canada. A consideration of the effects of white privilege and how racism can continue to exist in democratic societies will also be undertaken.

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by taylormcclure on October 28, 2014
The article “Because you’re black': Framboise Patisserie in Middle Village, Queens, hit with $25,000 in fines, penalties in discrimination case” written by Nathan Place, in New York Daily News from September 29, 2013, discusses the case of Jamilah DaCosta and her experience with racial discrimination DaCosta, an African American, was applying for a job at the Framboise Patisserie when the co-owner, Patty Meimetea, told her she wouldn't be a good fit for the “counter girl position” because her skin colour would scare away the customers.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by S. Srbinoska on October 28, 2014
                           Fired for Teaching History?

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Jenny_ on October 28, 2014
An article was recently posted on ABC NEws; written by Pete Yost, a journalist from The Associated Press. Entitled " Judges Dismiss Complaint on Allegad Bias Remarks", the author talks about a recent misconduct complaint by several individuals, regarding a judge's remark during a speech that was said to be 'racially discriminatory', which was afterwards dismissed by a group of federal judges whom were looking over the case.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by EbonieJC on October 28, 2014
Yes we HATE them, but it is NOT a crime!

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nadiafankhauser on October 27, 2014
       The article “Torrence Collier, 11, says he faces racism, extreme bullying in Westport” which is posted on the 11th of June this year on the CBC news website is explaining the hard life of an 11 years old that faces racism in his school, like mentioned in the title. As the article goes on we read that the young boy is the only black child in the whole town. He faces everyday extreme bullying, at a point where he has to go to a separate bathroom to avoid attacks and his called a “rapist” sometimes, in grade 5.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nadiafankhauser on October 27, 2014
       The article “Torrence Collier, 11, says he faces racism, extreme bullying in Westport” which is posted on the 11th of June this year on the CBC news website is explaining the hard life of an 11 years old that faces racism in his school, like mentioned in the title. As the article goes on we read that the young boy is the only black child in the whole town. He faces everyday extreme bullying, at a point where he has to go to a separate bathroom to avoid attacks and his called a “rapist” sometimes, in grade 5.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Liam C. on October 27, 2014
Henry Mcdonald’s article: “Racism in Northern Ireland: ‘They called our children monkeys’” discusses a mixed-race couple’s struggle to integrate themselves into a catholic, working-class area near Belfast, and the potential reasons for why a fairly large and seemingly-growing amount of people express such a xenophobic attitude towards immigrants in their community.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by sonny on October 27, 2014
The Combat against Racism

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by aoranos on October 27, 2014
Fifty Years After MLK’s ‘Dream,’ a Nation Still Divided by Scott Martelle is an article that discusses the results of a study about the perceptions of racial equality in America. The author says that the article found that whites have a much rosier view of the way blacks are treated in America than blacks do. An example of this is that only 44 percent of whites felt that a lot more needs to be done to achieve full racial equality while 79 percent of blacks felt so.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Darin Tse on October 26, 2014
In the article "Volunteers help clean vandalism from Cold Lake mosque", Josh Elliott writes about an incident of racism that occurred in Cold Lake, Alberta. On October 22nd, 2014, Canadians across the country were shocked by an attack on our nation's capital. This act of violence was brought by a Canadian born man, who converted to Islam, and left one Canadian soldier dead at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. However, this article is less about the attacks, and more about the aftermath of these attacks, specifically an event that occurred in Cold Lake.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Florence C. on October 25, 2014
The article “Study finds Boston police target African-Americans disproportionately” written by Marina Carver at CNN on October 9th this year, denounces the fact that there is a large discrepancy in the amount of blacks being stopped and frisked in comparison to the predominantly white homogenous population. This overrepresentation of African-Americans involved in police inquiries is not justified because in truth they only embody a small fraction of the population; nor is it representative of a group supposedly more susceptible to have criminal conduct.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by and.r.e.w.. on October 7, 2014
In the article “Racism is Canada’s Problem Too – Let’s Talk About it” by Craig and Marc Kielburger they talk about racism still being around in Canada and almost any “race” is subjectable to it. They start off by talking about Canada’s minister for Multiculturalism and how he was a subject of racism in an Edmonton tennis club for being a Canadian Sikh.  He overheard a woman whispering about how she can’t believe the tennis club was allowing Sikhs to become members and continued on by saying she doesn’t believe that the minister had a job.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by hsoppit on October 4, 2014
The article “Michael Brown Shooting: Why Black Americans Believe They're Targeted by Police” by Mark Gollum on CBC News from august 13, 2014 discusses how black Americans perceive themselves as being targeted by the police and why that would be the case (Gollum, 2014, para 2). The recent killing of unarmed teenager, Michael brown, by a Caucasian police officer has caused a reaction of outrage across the United States, especially in predominantly black communities.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Sarah Lessard on October 2, 2014
The article Dueling narratives in Michael Brown shooting, by the 9 writers who contributed to the article such as Eliott C. McLaughhlin and Joe Sutton from the CNN U.S News website on September 16th, 2014 explains the different versions that the police and the witnesses gave to what happened before the shooting that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Liam C. on October 2, 2014
In Kali Holloway’s article “Racism is so insidious, even black people underestimate it”, posted by the guardian on September 29th, 2014, the author underlines people’s ignorance in regards to the true size of racism and it’s pervasiveness in North American society. Her main point in the article is that most americans (generally white people) don’t believe that racism is a real factor in the US, and that many believe it is “entirely made up by black people”, despite all the evidence to prove it. She begins by underlining the effects of racial profiling in context to the justice system.

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Reply to: Art to contribute
4 years 4 months ago

I have never particularly been exposed to the reality of big cats being endangered because of the different things people subject them to. It would have been nice if you could elaborate on what Richardson's ambitions are for current and future projects. But otherwise, I think that it is an interesting take on trying to publicize the realities of wildcat exploitation by using art. I, personally, have always been fascinated by art but I know that many people do not appreciate art as much now. I think that in this day and age, a lot of people have access to the internet and many people have at least one account on a social media forum, which would allow people to 'share' the art for the cause of raising awareness for the topic. But I often wonder if there are other creative ways to raise awareness about the exploitation of wildcats. Because, for myself, when looking at pictures on the internet, I tend to passively pay attention to what I see therefore it is easy for me to forget what I have seen unless it was a shocking image or story, or the way what was trying to be said was portrayed in a creative way. If an image was shocking to me, like the image in the following link http://bigcatrescue.org/abuse-issues/issues/pet-cubs/tigerpoachingskins/, I would definitely remember it. I think that if there were different tactics being used at the same time to raise awareness about the exploitation, it would be successful. For example, there can be a carnival type of event where it can be a family event and the theme of the carnival would be to educate people about the cause. There can be games where it can teach children about the big cats, and what is being done o them. All the money that is raised from playing games can be used to help the cats that are in need.

4 years 4 months ago

I think you have risen many good points when it comes to the topic of physically/mentally individuals and physical activity. I think there is a lot of work to be done to have proper and consistent social support, and to try to alleviate and even remove the stigma against disabled individuals. They are the same as non-disabled individuals, they just have a different perspectives of the same situations and their perspectives are the still valid. I think that if physical activity is done in moderation, and done in an enjoyable environment like Defi Sportif, it really encourages everyone to partake in (and even organize) more activities! I think lack of knowledge about this cause is still needs to have a lot more awareness about it. I think a lot of people think that a mentally disabled individual's body works entirely different than from someone 'normal', but its that their bodies need a different type of care (as suggested in the following link http://www.down-syndrome.org/reviews/27/).

4 years 6 months ago

I think what you said in your post is very thought-provoking and gives (background) information on the death penalty. I personally do agree with you in the statement of killing the convicted criminal soon after the conviction. The state might as well get something over with as soon as possible rather than just waiting up to thirty or more years before killing someone. But the following link gives evidence that would say otherwise:
http://deathpenalty.org/section.php?id=13
It has been a huge debate on the frequency of how often the death penalty is being used in different countries, or even different cities of a single country (i.e.: different states f the U.S.). The lack of even death penalty enforcement, despite having the same policy in a single place, tends to be subjective. It has also been found that there have been convicted prisoners who have already been killed by the state but later to be proven innocent to through new (or newly looked over) evidence.

4 years 6 months ago

It is true that the topic of legalization of prostitution is not an easy debate to choose sides on. It is definitely a multi-faceted topic, in which may affect more people than we are aware of. I think you have brought up a good point that depending on how you look at prostitution, it may affect the end-opinion.
I have to admit though, I think you may need to offer more background information to readers, especially if a reader is not as educated about the policies or laws about prostitution.
The following are links to explicitly state the pros and cons of the legalization of prostitution and what the policies are in countries where prostitution is actually legal:
http://www.debate.org/legalized-prostitution/
http://prostitution.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000772

4 years 7 months ago

I think it is great that Canada has finally gotten the ball rolling in the conversation about medically assisted suicide. I was aware that the Supreme Court is in favour of assisted suicide, and I was extremely happy about this ruling, but I was not aware of any of the details of how the Supreme Court got to this ruling. I find that all the arguments that were used for the pros and cons of the subject very interesting and I had not particularly known about them before.
I personally think that people should have the ability to make the decision of if they want to do die. It is a great step forward for Canada in the rights of people in compromised health. But I must agree with about policies. There has to be very strict policies about implementing medically assisted suicide. I think that medical professionals and people interested in medically assisted suicide must be fully informed about all legal and medical details about what it is.

4 years 7 months ago

I find it quite interesting, in fact, that there is such a longitudinal study that has been conducted about stress. To me, it is even more fascinating that the findings of the study have correlated that stress is not necessarily the health risk but it is the individual's perspective of what stress that can cause serious health issues.
Personally, whenever I get stressed, I have sleep deprivation, I subconsciously grind my teeth together, and other such negative health hazards. I know that there are not many resources from schools or workplaces to obtain coping skills or mechanisms on how to handle stress. But the world of the internet can be quite vast in information, and if you look in the right places, you can find what you need to cope with stress. Such as the following site that gives tips on stress management: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-management.htm
This is a great post, opens up a better understanding of stress.

4 years 10 months ago

I believe that your analysis of this issue was spot on. I do agree that hockey is an emotional sport, and many of the fans are bound to get emotional as well, but racism has no place in hockey. Fantastic players have originated from all places and races of the world. There is no race in hockey that is superior that another and therefore race should not be used as a weapon to emotionally injure a player who has excelled.Subban once told a reporter that “As far as I’m concerned, I’m looked at as a hockey player. If people want to be ignorant and want to look at me as something else then they can. I’m a hockey player. I’ve played hockey all my life. It’s a sport that I love and I’m not worried about anything like that” (Article Below). This incident was an example of people made uneasy by being beaten and tried to reassert their dominance by putting Subban down using one of the only weapons they had left in their arsenal. This not only resulted in those involved to look foolish but also showed how some people react when their dominance is threatened. Subjects as delicate as race should not be used against players of any sport because their race does not help or hinder them in any way and therefore has no relevance in the world of sports.

Article: http://sports.nationalpost.com/2014/05/02/boston-bruins-take-right-step-...

4 years 10 months ago

Your article exposes some issues that are worthy of being heard by everyone and I salute you for your action.
I want to clarify that the aboriginal woman fall into this term called intersectionality which is a phenomena that victimizes a person from a few oppressed and discriminated social groups. These differences can overlap and the result can be a multiple times greater than only one difference. For the aboriginal women, they are part of the aboriginal community that is constantly overlooked by our government and come with many bad stereotypes, and they are also females, that still aren`t equal to men when it comes to salary and other aspects of our day to day lives.
What is sad about this story is that it took a large number of missing women before a person realized that this is currently an issue and now some organizations have been interested by it. Maybe one day we will find a solution to this conflict.

4 years 10 months ago

   I am a woman and even I ask myself such questions about equality. The title was quite to the point, which I admire, and while I do agree that men should make more of an effort to include the strengths of women in their decisions, nobody is perfect and women do the exact same thing when it comes to including men. Both sides are stubborn and sometimes, if not most of the time, sexism is used all too often. This makes me think of two things: penis envy and men’s privileges.
   First one, there has been a theory going around that all women secretly have a little something called ‘penis envy’. There are two ways to look at it; either all women envy the power that has been put onto the men when it comes to leadership, or all women secretly wish they had a penis of their own. Both are possible, but there’s no concrete way of proving it, since it’s more of an opinion. Personally, I believe it to be true because I have seen so many women, including myself, trying to reject things that make them more feminine just so they can become more like a man; boyish, tough, strong and best of all, has the power to do what they want. Becoming more ‘tom-boy’ means becoming less vulnerable and more tough, which are seen as strong points for earning one’s respect, however that’s not always true. The point is that such an image of strength and power has been mostly expected for men by society overall, so what girl can’t help but feel a little jealous of a man’s power?
   This brings me to ‘men’s privileges’. Like white privilege, men have certain privileges that women don’t; for example, as cops, men are taken more seriously than women, and men can walk through a park at night without the fear of being raped or beaten. To some sense, this is true that men do not have these sorts of problems, however that does not make all men responsible, nor does that make them the bad guys. This is the same as with white people having privileges; while this does not mean that they are at fault, you have to admit that there are certain things that present an issue of inequality. Wouldn’t you agree that in some cases, men have more privileges than women? Overall, though, I do think that women should lay off the sexism once in a while, but it’s not like there isn’t a gender inequality in the world, nor is it the fault of only men or only women. Wouldn’t you say so?

4 years 10 months ago

   There are many different stereotypes about many things, such as “men should never cry” or “all asians are good at math”. However, one should always remember that a stereotype is not a fact nor is it a justifiable explanation for why some asians ARE good at math. Unfortunately, ‘chasing stereotypes’, as you call it, seems to be all too common, even when we as a community and even as individuals should know better. The title caught my attention because of a discussion I had not long ago, regarding stereotypes. A lot of people that I know, in my generation, don’t take stereotypes very seriously. In fact, whenever we hear of a stereotype or even see it, we take it as a joke because we KNOW that it’s not true. This may not be the most respectful approach towards dealing with racial stereotypes or gender-related ones, but in truth, joking about it has become somewhat of a common ‘coping mechanism’ for society. Popular comedians like Gabriel Iglesias and Russell Peters, base their jokes on racial and sexual stereotypes as a way of making light of the problem that’s practically discrete. And as an audience, we know that they’re only jokes based on fiction, not fact.
   However, overall, when it comes to chasing stereotypes that have been brought onto them by society itself and the media, it gets to a point where some measures to achieve perfection are just too extreme to be worth it. Society has create an almost-impossible image of perfection that cannot be naturally achieved, however some people will go to any lengths possible to achieve it. Not only does this relate to appearance by sex, but also appearance by race as well. Have you ever heard of the term ‘shadism’? It is the discrimination based on skin tone - yes, this is a real thing. It is thought that having lighter skin makes you more beautiful than if you were to have darker skin. In India, women would use harsh chemicals like bleach to make their skin lighter just to be considered beautiful. Like stereotypes, they are false expectations as depicted by society, but exactly how did society get this way is my question. If you compare what an ideal woman was supposed to look like 50 years ago to what is expected now-a-days, you’d notice that these ‘ideal’ women have shrunk in size. We, as a generation, know it’s not realistic, and yet we’re still following down that path of ‘chasing stereotypes’. Is it possible for us to motivate a change in perspectives in the next 50 years?

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