Race and Racism 544 Fall 2014 (A. Nouvet)

About this class

Champlain College, Fall 2014

This course will introduce students to the concept of race from the perspective of biological and cultural anthropology. The first part of the course focuses on the distribution of human biological variation and compares this variation to contemporary ideas about race. The second part traces the historical development of the concept of race, the role that slavery, colonialism and science have played in the dissemination of the belief in race, as well as modern ideas of race. The third part of the course will explore the reality of racism through case studies from various countries, with a focus on Canada. A consideration of the effects of white privilege and how racism can continue to exist in democratic societies will also be undertaken.

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by antoine riendeau on November 3, 2014
The article ‘’Muslim candidate says volunteers faced with racism on campaign trail’’ by Mark Carcasole on the website Global Montreal from October 24th, 2014 reports the racist incident that volunteers for the muslim candidate,  Munira Abukar,  have been victims. The event occurred on Thursday night, October 23th, while the volunteers were installing election signs. A Purolator’s driver, who was passing by, stopped and threw a cup of coffee to the volunteers. After, he started insulting them, treating them of terrorists. The victims achieved to note down the truck’s license.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by and.r.e.w.. on November 3, 2014
The article “The Good, Racist People” By Ta-Nehisi Coates from the New York Times brings up an event that occurred to Forest Whitaker in a Manhattan delicatessen.  One of the delicatessen’s employees stopped Whitaker and said he had shoplifted from their deli. The employee searches him immediately and comes up with nothing. An interview with the owner of the deli shows that the owner was apologetic but states the employee was “‘a decent man’ who was ‘just doing his job.’” The author of the article then speaks about a growing feeling of distance towards the deli he once thought as good.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by C_herve9 on November 1, 2014
Serbians and Albanians decide to settle their political problems in a soccer field

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by romy.ahnroyer on October 29, 2014
The article "Parent's Fury After 'Discriminating' School Trip" by Gema Bate which was published in the Worcestershire News October 1st, 2014 discusses a school trip that left out English speaking students. On September 30th of this year, St-Mary's Primary School, in Kidderminster, England took children who did not speak English as their first language to a petting farm, while the other students stayed at school for their usual lessons.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by David.G on October 28, 2014
Ebola, Also an Outbreak of Racism?            

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Jazceal Johnstone on October 28, 2014
The article “Florida Moms Putting Kids up for Adoption see Canada as Promised Land with ‘Less Racism’ than U.S.” by Elizabeth Payne in the National Post on July 21, 2014 brings up the issue of the increase in children being put up for adoption in Canada by African-American parents because the multicultural country has less racism than in the United States. The author explains that these women wish for their children to be raised in a society that does not limit them based on their skin tone. These families believe that Canada will less expose their children to racism.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Keshree on October 28, 2014
THE “N” WORD: DOES LANGUAGE MATTER?

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by rorych on October 28, 2014
          The article, “Has Ebola exposed a strain of racism?” by Hannah Kozlowska published in the New York Times on October 21st discusses how Ebola might have brought various racist attitudes in care systems, medias, politics etc. To support her idea, the author uses Thomas Erica Duncan’s situation, a black man who contracted Ebola and has been refused from a hospital. However, through the articles many experts gave their opinions about racism being an issue in the medical field.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by hsoppit on October 28, 2014
The article “Race and Racism Central Issue of Election” by Margaret Hageman from The Toronto Star on October 14, 2014 discusses the issue of racism in Toronto and emphasizes the importance of electing a mayor who comprehends the role that racism plays within the city (Hageman, 2014, para 2). When a place has “Diversity Our Strength” as their motto, the author finds it important to have a leader who understands racism. The current white majority in Toronto will soon become the minority as the number of non-white people in the city increases (Hageman, 2014, para 3).

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by alexj on October 28, 2014
The article ‘’ Ward 2 Candidate’s sign vandalized with racist graffiti’’ by Jenny Yuen in the Toronto Sun journal from October 11th 2014 explains a tragic gesture that has been done towards a 22 years old Somali-Canadian girl named Munira Abukar. One of her friends had seen her candidate Ward 2 campaign board filled with graffiti’s and then, told her about it. On the Campaign board it was written ‘’ Go back home,’’ the people who did this gesture also added on the top of her name the word bitch.  Munira Abukar thought that it was shocking and mean. It also frustrated her.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by laeti.y.felix on October 28, 2014
            In the article called “Talking to Small Children About Race” by Anne Theriault, really hits home to many families across the nation.  Many parents either don’t see or understand that racism is still an issue, or parents never truly get to sit down with their children and have a good long talk about what it (race) is because they just don’t know how.  There still a larger majority of parents, according to this article, who play the ‘colour blindness’ card.  Colour blindness is when someone does not think that people are necessarily different colours, but they think that everyone

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by j.nguyen on October 28, 2014
In the article “For Black Students the School to Prison Pipeline Is in Higher Gear Than Ever” by Earl Ofari Hutchinson in Huffington Post from October 24th, 2014 explains how there are a concentrated amount of black students that are either expelled or suspended in America’s public school institutions and under the radar the number of black students who get arrested based on alleged behaviours are greater than expulsion or suspension. If the student is black, a single wrong look or slight scuffle could cause the school to involve the police.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by MariaJoseAA on October 28, 2014
Maria Jose Acosta 28/10/2014 Article summary.   Cold Heart.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by rachel.vienneau on October 28, 2014
            The article “Charles Barkley: ‘Brainwashed’ blacks hold up success” published on CNN on October 27, 2014, author Breeanna Hare writes about a recent radio interview done by former NBA player Charles Barkley, who is an African-American. In the interview, Barkley talks about another African-American athlete named Russel Wilson who is the quarterback of the Seattle Seahawks football team. Barkley talks about the rumors surrounding Wilson that state that some of his teammates dislike him because they feel like he is not “black enough”.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by samchaussé on October 28, 2014
London Ontario is home to many people, it is known to be the city of students, but also as the “white city”. Being a black kid in a white city will be hard, especially if they constantly hear racist and inappropriate comments based on their ethnicity or even skin color. Also being the only kid of color with two other friends in the whole dormitory can be hard too. One night out in a club called Jacks, after their first shot they see white kids dressed as blackface.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Pascale.Bastien on October 28, 2014
The article “The Business Case for Diversity in the Tech Industry” by Farhad Manjoo in the New York Times from September 26, 2014 explains why Google has such a strong desire to have cultural diversity amongst employees. For this multinational corporation, what they call “diversity” is essential since it is a key element for their business’s performance and success. Google sees diversity from a different perspective than most companies do. For them, hiring people from different origins is more than a simple desire to be politically correct.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by jessica fredette on October 28, 2014
            The article “The implicit racism in Ebola tragedy” by Robin Wright on the CNN website published on October 9, 2014 talks about how the Ebola Virus has caused some racism toward people of color in the United-States. It is said in the article that in both Europe and the United-States Ebola has been a cause of racial profiling. It was reported that in Dallas some kids, because of their skin color or heritage, were being called “Ebola Kids”.

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Reply to: Education for All
2 years 9 months ago

This is a very good post ! The thing that caught my attention was the title of the post "Education for all". This post made me think about the fact that education is a thing that most people take for granted because it is accessible for them. However, it is true that disabled people do not have equal access to education. It was very interesting to learn that education has a great impact on disabled people's health and their autonomy. Overall, this made me think about a concept that we learned in class: "White privilege". When you said " they will be put at an extreme disadvantage in society making their success and quality of life difficult to accomplish", it made me think about the fact that minorities are put in disadvantage in society as well. Because of their "race" the education system may be not treating them equally, which has a negative effect of their chances to succeed. Also, when you stated that " they are given lower standards" and "fall significantly behind their peers", is similar in many ways to the fact that racial minorities are given these stereotypes that they "can do less", when in reality they are not given the same opportunities. That is why I thought your post made me think of the concept of White privilege. Very good post !

2 years 9 months ago

What drew me to the blog about the article was the title. I found it interesting because binge drinking is something that people in my age group do, so to have a study done on testing it, seems quite intriguing. I completely agreed with the article as it says that people around the age of eighteen to twenty-two years old usually binge drink, no no one ever suspects anything other than that teenagers drink. I believe that the blog had some good key points about the article and helped explain the study that was provided in the article. I personally think that this topic relates to implicit and explicit racism and the stereotypes faced with that. In class we discussed the topic of implicit racism which means that a person does not necessarily know that they are being racist. Just like in the text, many adults just assume that teenagers binge drink because they are teenagers. They don’t necessarily take into account that other factors may come into play such as: peer behaviour. Explicit racism is when people are flat out racist and don’t care what other people think or say. For example: in the blog about the summary, the author mentioned that teenagers around the age of eighteen to twenty-two years old who are in school binge drink the same amount as others who aren’t in school full time. A lot of adults flat out blame that if they aren’t in school, they have more time to drink and the study in the article proved that to be wrong; which I found extremely fascinating.

2 years 9 months ago

I was truly interested in reading this post, the tittle made me think of another article i read recently for my Anthropology class,"The Myth of Race and the Reality of Racism". The article was about the "Blacklivesmatter" movement as well, the article name is “Reclaiming the White Coat for Black lives” by authors: Amy Garvey, Denzel Woode and Charlotte S. Austin. It discussed Medial systems and how they are still discriminating people of color. It is a sad reality that not only minority groups are being discriminated everyday for various reasons, even in medical systems they are still the inferior group and are being treated differently. When i started to read your post, it made me want to read the article that you reflected on and it was sad to read that because people of color who live in poor neighborhood's have a harder time finding employment or success. I totally agree with you that this shouldn't be the case. Today's society has developed an attitude towards this general subject of "Race and Racism" and that it is normal for minority groups to be less successful or inferior to white people. Most people are not well informed on this subject and it should be discussed more and we should teach our future children about Race and Racism and how it is an issue that we need to address and be aware of. Overall, i really enjoyed your post it really got me thinking!

2 years 9 months ago

This was an interesting post, to say the least. I'm particularly interested in topics concerning police work, especially given recent events in the states, so I decided to give your article a quick read. I was unaware of the fact that the U.N. was implementing police forces into other countries, which is nice because learning new things is always welcome. I can also certainly agree with the notion that police officers lack sufficient training, as we have witnessed several occurances of officers violating human rights in an attempt to "do what is right", and that just speaks volumes about just how knowledgeable they are about their jobs, or perhaps how much the officers respect the rules. On a racial standpoint, I theorize that there is perhaps also a lack of training at how to approach and "deal" with people of different races, as often times accidents and incidents happen due to racist or prejudiced misconceptions of an otherwise perfectly normal human being. It'd be an interesting subject to observe; how officers are taught to maybe put aside implicit or explicit racial biases in order to appropriately do their jobs.
I digress. This was a thought provoking post, although some concepts discussed within it were a little confusing and would need some elaborating, despite being a very good analysis/summary.
Great work.

2 years 10 months ago

I've heard quite a bit about police officers killing unarmed black men, and I have mixed feelings about it, which is probably why I stopped to read this post. I feel like it's a pretty sad reality we live in, if the people we are supposed to look to for protection, are the ones we need to be protected from. The way some of these officers react, especially to our citizens of minority status, really is an example of how people have a preconceived perception of how people are, based on race. These people will either act with fear, or with aggression, at the prospect of armed (or unarmed) black people, and that's really just a sad mindset to be in. On the other hand, I do believe that some of the claims to racism are exaggerated, and perhaps it is just coincidence at times, that a white officer must deal with a black criminal, and we're not getting all the facts. Who can we trust to give us the fact, really? I think the measures being taken to ensure that cops are doing their jobs need to be reevaluated, and things such as body cameras are only a step in the right direction to AT LEAST monitor and moderate police behavior, and give us some facts during an altercation. In any case, I really enjoyed reading this, and you did a supreme job at getting me genuinely interested in reading the article you found. Thank you.

2 years 10 months ago

I was drawn to this post by its title because it made me realize how people like waiters and waitresses are constantly harassed and not everyone does or say anything about it. I found it very interesting to learn that 66% of waitresses are sexually harassed and asked to dress provocatively in order to get more tips and that ever the employer encourages this kind of negative behavior instead of protecting his/hers employees. I think that men and especially women should not be put under such pressure. It is really disturbing that someone has to wear inappropriate clothes at a workplace. In the addition this, when you said " women’s bosses tell them to wear provocative clothes in order to get bigger tips", it makes me think of the concept of race. We could compare the boss to society and the waitresses as a minority group and the waiters as "white" people, which is the privileged group. Obviously, women are more affected by the orders of the boss than men are just as a minority group is more affected by the concept of race than white people are. In conclusion, I think that everyone should be respected at their workplace no matter their gender, race, etc.

2 years 10 months ago

This topic was very interesting for me on a more personal level. I was intrigued to the original post because the two concepts chosen; Crime rates and Ice Cream are completely two separate topics. Relating the two seem almost impossible to do. My reaction to this post was like anyone else’s I’m sure; confused at the beginning but once ice cream was shown how it connected to crimes and violence rates increasing, it was completely understandable. My reaction to the ending was normal as I completely agree with your statement about whether or not we should have gender neutral washrooms. This comment reminded me of another social inequality. In my class, the topic of slavery came up and somehow I made a connection between the two. Both slaves and LGBT’s both have the same issue going for them. Slaves were separated from the white people who were the minority, and LGBT’s are separated based on their genders. People who were chosen as slaves stood out seeing that they were more often than not a different pigmentation colour. Just like the LGBT’s do since society says it’s okay to do so. Once again we still prove to be focused on dividing and separating people based on their physical appearances. Slaves were treated unfairly then just like LGBT’s are treated unfairly now in our communities.

2 years 10 months ago

This post made me think of an issue I hadn’t considered before, just by reading your tittle I was already engaged and wanted to learn more. I did not have a complete understanding of the subject before reading this article. I didn’t know that women were banned to battle in the military. I do agree with you that both women and men should have an equal chance to participate in the military. Gender as we know it has separated us in many activities or events, such as sports. We are build differently but, women are categorized as being weak and unable to achieve the same things as men. In relation to my Myth of Race and the Reality of Racism class, gender can also correlate with race and racism. For instance, men are often viewed as stronger and superior to women; in comparison to slavery and that people of color are slaves because they are known to be “inferior” or different from Caucasians. In the end, it all comes down to equality and that everyone should have equal rights no matter what gender or race you are. Over all I really liked your article, it was well done!

Reply to: Races for Dummies
2 years 11 months ago

i really appreciated that you took the time to comment on my article. It is a shame that our society still assumes a lot and especially just by looking at someone. Thank you for your comment it was nice to read that you enjoyed my writing and i hope other people take a step back and realize what they are doing by always assuming things.

3 years 10 months ago

Hello,
I find it very interesting how you claim that the law makes the public aware just enough to not rebel in any shape or form. In a way this is true but we as people don’t repress the thoughts of what could happen if we defy the law, we are well aware of the consequences that can happen if we commit any crime. Can the law truly be an invisible force? or do we make it one in order to not feel controlled by a higher authority? I agree with the idea that we as people do not have regular encounters with the citizens who work to keep the law controlled and present. But that’s because, we oblige by these rules subconsciously. Ethical Rationalism is a form of Deontology theory in which, “moral truths are knowable a prior, by reason alone.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_rationalism) As humans, we are born with a common sense of what is right and wrong. Ultimately the law is based on these senses and written clearly for everyone to act upon to keep society functioning well and safely. Reason is what makes us different from the other species and it allows us to work freely with no limitations to our knowledge. Having reason, gives us the moral obligation to oblige by the law that is a social construct and this comes naturally.

- PinkTurtle

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