Learning to Learn

About this class

In this class, we are exploring learning through the lens of cognitive science, the social sciences, and literature. We will be blogging to deepen our own understanding of learning as well as that of our readers.

SUNY Brockport
by sreed3 on December 10, 2014
                I actually got this idea from our exam. One of the scenarios talked about an excerpt from James Zull’s book “The Art of Changing the Brain”. The article talks about how a lot of professors try to give students to much information at once and in to short a period of time. The truth is, although students do need to do work in order to achieve their goals, some professor’s really expect too much.

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SUNY Brockport
by wburg1 on December 6, 2014
               There are many factors that weigh a heavy influence on a student’s academic success. Sleep, time management, and teacher selection are just a few. But in college, not all of these things are easy to satisfy. And when it comes to choosing classes, these things are often priorities. But one of the things that most students don’t consider when choosing a class is the amount of learners are also in the class with them. This is a major factor and its importance has not gone unnoticed.

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SUNY Brockport
by dhend2 on December 6, 2014
The research article “How Sleep Improves Memory” discusses the findings of researches at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In the study they conducted, twelve young adults were taught a series of finger movements. Afterwards, the individuals were given a twelve hour period in which they either rested or stayed awake. They were then tested on their ability to recall the finger movements while an MRI measured activity level in the brain. The researchers found that the individuals that slept were able to recall information faster, more accurately, and with less stress/anxiety.

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SUNY Brockport
by bpier5 on December 5, 2014
            After I had finished reading the article “Can We Make Our Children Smarter?” by Carol S. Dweck, I found myself trying to answer that very question; is it possible to actually make children smarter.  At this point in time, I feel as if I have no answer to that question.  There a couple of things that were presented in the article that made me believe that there was a way to make children smarter, but then I would wonder and really think about how that would realistically work out.  You be the judge of that.

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SUNY Brockport
by sdalt1 on December 5, 2014
Innovative Learning  

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SUNY Brockport
by qjohn2 on December 5, 2014
In the research article, Life Goals Among Greek College Students, they did a study on Greek students and how they would rank their life goals out of nineteen different categories raked from one to five. The study was conducted at Bucknell University; Ninety-six students were used from different sororities and fraternities. The question that Abowitz and Knox were trying to answer was ‘Do fraternity and sorority members rank a life in public service or political office over the general idea that fraternities and sororities create more of a personal and emotional goal.’ It was found that indeed fraternity and sorority members think about personal and emotional goals over a life in public service or political office.

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SUNY Brockport
by rsalo1 on December 4, 2014
    When you get to college, you are introduced to a secret society known as Greek life. People form two opinions about it, one is that these groups just party 24/7 and don’t care about school, while the other is that they are helpful for the college by doing charity work or community service while increasing their social skills. In this article they characterize Greek life as a positive experience.

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SUNY Brockport
by trodr3 on December 4, 2014
  The Affordability of Learning  

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SUNY Brockport
by cdiet1 on December 3, 2014
The Importance of Socially Resilient Mindsets

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SUNY Brockport
by sstep2 on December 2, 2014
Educational Anxiety

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SUNY Brockport
by kchas1 on November 19, 2014
Kyle Chase News Activist post                                                         Exercise does in fact Improve Brain Function  

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SUNY Brockport
by rsalo1 on November 17, 2014
    In today’s world children fail and just give up. They don’t have someone to encourage them or have someone say it’s going to be okay, you just got to keep trying and you’ll succeed. For example if a children fails a test but they studied really hard for it, they’re going to give up because they saw their best didn’t work, so they think why bother trying anymore. That’s why you see a high rate of kids dropping out of high school and college because no one gives them the support to keep trying when things get rough.

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SUNY Brockport
by wburg1 on November 17, 2014
When it comes to college, sleep is one of those things a student can’t ever seem to get enough of. Whether it’s pulling an all-nighter studying or an all-nighter partying, messing with your sleep schedule and your quality of sleep can drastically affect your learning potential. Sleep isn’t just important for school, it is also important for your health.

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SUNY Brockport
by qtubb1 on November 17, 2014
               “The New Science of Learning:  How to Learn in Harmony with Your Brain,” by Terry Doyle and Todd Zakrajsek, was written to help students find and implement ways to become better learners. Chapter 8, “Paying Attention”, specifically focuses on attention spans and ways to improve learning. The focus of this chapter is to propose ways that students can increase their learning, be better engaged, and get the most out of their lessons, even if the subject matter is boring.

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SUNY Brockport
by trodr3 on November 17, 2014
      In today's technological age, educational institutions are moving towards incorporating more web based learning experiences for students. However, while this idea may seem beneficial, there are many pitfalls that could end up outweighing any benefits a student may receive from the experience.

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SUNY Brockport
by jprou2 on November 15, 2014
Every day we read little messages to one another in short, fast spinnets, but chances are we didn't realize we were re-wiring the way our brains learn.  The human brain is extremely adaptable. Because we can train it to function best by recieving quick, incomplete sentences, and fast answers, we are promoting short attention spans and the need for fast answers. After I read the following article by Nicholas Carr on how our means of daily communication and learning is actually making us stupid, I immediately related.

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SUNY Brockport
by ckill1 on November 14, 2014
Take a Hike!New research shows that taking a walk can enhance creativity

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SUNY Brockport
by qjohn2 on November 14, 2014
What do you call them? Bouncing Balls, Balance Balls, Exercise Balls, Stability Balls, or Therapy Balls? No matter what you call them, did you know it could improve your learning? According to Karen Lynch, who wrote How Sitting on a Ball Helps Kids Focus and Do Better In School, says that bouncing on a ball can in fact lead to better grades overall. Today, doctors are recommending sitting on a ball to children who have a hard time focusing in the classroom or any sensory processing disorders. Since the 1960s when bouncing balls were created, society has been finding new ways that they could be beneficial to us whether it be through exercise or learning. In 1980, 2003, and 2007 studies were done that concluded that bouncing balls would be a valuable tool that could be used inside of the classroom.

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SUNY Brockport
by sdalt1 on November 14, 2014
There has been a lot of debate over the years that college instructors and college courses do not cater towards student’s attention spans.  A lot college courses are lecture-based courses, which means there is usually a teacher talking or lecturing to a class of a lot of students. This allows students to not pay attention and be on their phone the whole time during class.

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Reply to: Assisted Suicide
4 years 7 months ago

Assisted suicide is a topic that I am strongly opinionated on. I believe that if a person truly wishes to end their life, they should have the freedom to do so. This is especially true in cases similar to Susan’s, in which people have a terminal or debilitating medical condition that will cause them to suffer the rest of their life. To me, it is unethical that people with terminal illnesses are forced to go through an extended period of suffering before they die rather than doing so in peace. A person should have the freedom to decide for themselves whether their life is worth continuing.
My strong opinion is most likely because I grew up in a country that strongly values individual freedom and choice. In addition, I grew up in a secular family. Many religious people I’ve talked to believe that a higher power should decide when people are born and when they die. In other words, they believe in death by natural causes and see suicide as unnatural.
I really liked the example you used in your post because it is one that will spark a lot of controversy. On one hand, she is paralyzed from the neck down and will be able to do very little with her life without help. On the other hand, she doesn’t have a terminal illness and therefore may someday find meaning in her life. People will form different opinions over the issue depending on whether they value the continuation of life over personal freedom or vise versa.

4 years 7 months ago

This subject is very complex because it is a question of where we should draw the line. Most people agree that the welfare of humans should be prioritized over the welfare of animals. This is the main argument in favor of animal testing. What is more debated is whether or not people should benefit at the expense of animals. In the particular case you discussed, I am absolutely against what the scientists did to the baby monkeys. To have such extensive abuse of animals with little to no benefit to humans is wrong. I am only in favor of conducting research on animals when the animals are simplistic, such as rats, and when the experiment will lead to significant scientific advances. Unfortunately, what defines animals as simplistic enough and advances to be significant enough to justify animal testing, is a matter of opinion that will be different for each person. There is not a dividing line between when it is ethical and when it is not.
My experiences have definitely shaped my opinion on this subject. I grew up with a love for science because both of my parents were engineers. Being around their work made me fascinated with all areas of science. At the same time, I have loved animals for as long as I can remember. Growing up with pets and Disney movies that personified animals most likely impacted this. Because I grew up with an appreciation for both science and animals, I am very divided on the whether or not it is ethical to use animals for scientific research.
I liked that you used a detailed example in your post; however the story and phrasing might lead the reader to a form a biased opinion. In the future, it might be helpful to include an additional story of when using non-human animals for research led to a great advancement in scientific and medical knowledge. This way, the reader gains a broader perspective of a complex matter.

4 years 7 months ago

This is a very well written article that is backed up with a ton of statistics and theories of what could happen in the future. It is interesting to sit back and watch history potentially repeat itself like it did with the prohibition. I also liked how you started out with a nice background of all the guidelines and rules for marijuana and its legalization in Colorado. It gave the uneducated reader a solid foundation to follow along in your post even if they knew nothing about the topic. The only thing I wish you did was take other people’s points of view. You seemed to focus on only one guys stand point and while his ideas were very interesting and intelligent, another side or theory would be exciting to see. I know you were basing off of his study but an outside source could really put this over the top. Overall I thought you did a good job at organizing this article and really pulling apart everything you could from Mr. Flanagan’s study.

4 years 7 months ago

This is a very well written article that is backed up with a ton of statistics and theories of what could happen in the future. It is interesting to sit back and watch history potentially repeat itself like it did with the prohibition. I also liked how you started out with a nice background of all the guidelines and rules for marijuana and its legalization in Colorado. It gave the uneducated reader a solid foundation to follow along in your post even if they knew nothing about the topic. The only thing I wish you did was take other people’s points of view. You seemed to focus on only one guys stand point and while his ideas were very interesting and intelligent, another side or theory would be exciting to see. I know you were basing off of his study but an outside source could really put this over the top. Overall I thought you did a good job at organizing this article and really pulling apart everything you could from Mr. Flanagan’s study.

Reply to: Assisted Suicide
4 years 7 months ago

Assisted suicide is a very touchy topic but has to be looked at from multiple angles. When I was in 10th grade, one of my close friends committed suicide. He was upset over a recent break up and resorted to hanging himself at a nearby park. He was one of the most out-going and funny people you could ever meet. He won the superlative “Everybody’s best friend” in his senior year and rightfully so. Everyone loved him and coming from a school that graduates 180 people a year this impacted everyone. For about a week nobody went to class. The library, counseling office, and even friendly teachers were busy mourning with students about the loss. This is where I think suicide, assisted or not, is a selfish act. He didn’t think about all of us that were left behind. This was the easy way out. To answer your questions the only way I think assisted suicide should be allowed is if it is given a waiting period of atleast 6 months. I think this because if you look up a lot of people’s stories about surviving attempted suicide the majority of them say it was the greatest thing that has ever happened to them. They say they were living in the moment and regret ever even thinking about leaving their friends and family behind. This is why I believe a waiting period could possibly benefit the suicidal person to give them a chance to really think about this choice. I’m sure Daryl would never think about it again if he survived. Rest in peace my friend.

Reply to: Darrien Hunt
4 years 7 months ago

I like how you decide to write about an issue like this because it’s becoming bigger and bigger in this country because of Ferguson. I agree with you that it’s still sad that people are still being judged on race. I like how you point out this issue of cops shooting people because of their race is becoming a common theme in this country. I really like how you ended your essay with a question it gets the readers thinking at the end of your essay, maybe you can add a question in the beginning of your essay next time too.

4 years 7 months ago

I agree with you that it’s sad that poor child labor laws get unlooked in these countries. It’s terrible to see this kids in poor conditions for little pay to support their families. I liked how you used the example of Wael Mashrawi to show what really what kids go through when they work in these poor countries. This post made me think about if there are any corrupted child labor laws in America. If you want a way to improve our essay is you could maybe talk about if there are any ways that these countries are trying to improve child labor laws now their exposed through this article.

4 years 7 months ago

I agree that there should be more of a focus on preventing crime rather than punishing those who have committed a crime. It is much more of an active approach to reduce crime by preventing it from happening in the first place. I also agree that a good way to prevent crime is to help those more prone to ending up in prison. The amount of prisoners and homeless people who are mentally ill is unacceptable. If we spent money to help them become healthy and functioning members of society, the return on investment would be substantial. People who are able to find work and a home contribute to tax dollars while people spending time in prison or on the streets cost taxpayers billions of dollars every year.
My education has definitely impacted my opinion on this topic. This semester, I have learned a lot about how factors like income, stability of environment, and support from others during childhood affect their financial and emotional well-being later in life. Additionally, I have learned a lot about how private prisons, which profit off of crime, are becoming a larger part of American society. Instead of being motivated to reduce crime, these prisons are motivated to increase their profits. Lastly, I have learned about the concept of investment. While spending money on preventing crime may cost us money at first, it will return more money in the long-run because we are spending less money on keeping prisoners in jail and benefiting from their taxes.
I liked that you mentioned a few of the strategies the author suggests to prevent crime. In the future, it might be helpful to elaborate on how these strategies would be more effective. For example, how would supporting single parents help to keep people out of prison?

4 years 7 months ago

The morality of capital punishment is one of the most debated subjects in today's society. I tend to be very opinionated; however I am very divided when it comes to capital punishment. I think that in order for capital punishment to be acceptable, the crime committed has to be especially heinous, and the evidence against the individual has to be overwhelming. Because I believe that almost every individual has some good in them, I am generally against the use of capital punishment. I have learned that it is often the environment a person is raised in that most heavily impacts their likelihood to commit crimes. I like the idea of focusing on how to teach a criminal to become a functional member of society rather than focusing on punishment for something that already happened. However I also don't believe that they should be treated with too much sympathy. If someone committed a crime severe enough to make them a permanent threat, the focus should not be to rehabilitate them into society. Every individual has choices and they should be held responsible for their actions. Even so it seems to me that the death penalty is an easy way out, rather than making the person face life in prison.
My opinions on capital punishment have most likely been shaped by the area I grew up in. Because I live in a state that tends to be very liberal, the opinions of my peers have probably impacted my own opinion. If I grew up in Texas, my opinion might have become very different. In addition, my opinion has been impacted by my education. For example in my “Learning to Learn” class, we have learned about how a person’s race, parents, class, and surroundings when they are growing up all heavily impact their likelihood for success.
I liked how you used an example in your post to raise the question of whether capital punishment is ethical. In the future, you might want to try and present both sides of the argument to give the reader a better perspective of the issue.

4 years 7 months ago

This is very unique, and it originates close to home for me. I come from Tillsonburg, ON, so London is just a little drive away. Considering this is a Catholic school, I do not think that the school is obligated to accommodate for other religious practices. I am sure that the Muslim students were aware that the school was openly Catholic when they enrolled. I think that it is very considerate and perceptive that the school opened up this prayer room for the Muslim believers, but in no way do I think this is a necessary practice. If the school was a public school, however, and without any denominational devotion, I would think an interfaith chapel, or rooms to accommodate other religious would be appropriate.
Addressing your first question, I do not think that the Catholic environment and educational experience would disappear if the Muslim faith is intermingling. By showing Catholics other faiths it may challenge their beliefs and help them view their religion through different eyes; in this way, it may help to strengthen their understanding of their own faith. I am interested to know how the environment of the school is responding to this change, or if they simply are blending together in harmony.

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