Gendered World Views (Winter 2017, section 8)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be nice – we then assign an aesthetic to each group that reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will introduce students to the patriarchal world view that created the gendered stereotypes we live with today and the ways in which gendered assumptions structure society. We will then focus on the challenges that have been raised by the feminist world view and explore how women deal with gender inequality. The second half of the course will be largely dedicated to masculinity studies and feminist observations regarding how the patriarchal world view hurts men as well. Finally, we will end with a brief look at what queer theory has to say about gender. Students will be asked to reflect on their own world views and how gendered ideas have effected their lives. A participation grade will be assigned.

Marianopolis College
by wd1999 on March 7, 2017
Sexism in American Apparel Advertising  

167 | 3 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Deduction on February 27, 2017
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2010-10-21/calvin_klein_banned_image/40334   This is a 2010 Calvin Klein advertisement which publicizes jeans. The image contains three men and a woman enclosed in a cage. Two of the men are half naked and wear only the advertised jeans, while the other man is wearing a half-opened shirt. The woman however is almost completely naked, wearing only a sexy bra.

111 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Regan X on February 27, 2017
In the year 2007, the company jbs release series of four commercial pictures to promote their men’s underwear products. One of these pictures demonstrates a maid is holding a men's underwear and smelling it (jbs). She has a very exposed dress; the public could barely see the private areas. Furthermore, the room is very messy, and the female underwear falls on a lamp, which is reminiscent of sexual intercourse that might happen. This advertisement attracts men’s attention.

92 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by dudeperfect on February 27, 2017
                                            Are breasts the only way to sell? Link to the ad -https://mic.com/articles/133564/a-new-campaign-women-not-objects-is-call...  

206 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by TheOfficialXunWah on February 26, 2017
The world is slowly evolving in its technological capabilities and as it evolves, the media becomes a lot more accessible. We live in a society where advertisements can be seen anywhere, from having the company logo on your shirt to having a pop-up on your computer. Nearly any form of communication in our world will have a presence of some sort of advertisement. These commercials can have a great influence in our lives and on our ways of thinking because we encounter at least hundreds of them every single day.

118 | 1 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Vi3ws on February 25, 2017
Gendered World Views 345-102-MQ February 24, 2017 Analyzing an Ad: Women in the Media   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/emma-gray/snickers-ad-satisfies-tells-men-to-eat-before-sex_b_1563847.html  

179 | 1 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Lateguy123 on February 24, 2017
Professor Sarah Waurechen Gendered World Views February 24th, 2017 Media’s Attack on Women

115 | 0 | 1
Marianopolis College
by purplepanda123 on February 24, 2017
The media has grown enormously over the past 10 years. Tv shows, the news, movies, newspapers, social media sites and ads are all used to entertain, inform and stay connected with people across the globe. For the most part this is perceived in a good light. There is, however, a flip side to this. In the media today, there is an increasing amount of objectification and sexism towards women for heterosexual men to consume.

96 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by No Name on February 24, 2017
Award winner of Cannes Festival 2010, yet banned from public posters by the Advertising Standards Authority, Diesel’s controversial “Be Stupid” campaign focuses on pushing the boundaries of socially constructed ideals by creating a thought-provoking advertisement in an attempt to depict "a very strong and unexpected image of femininity" to encourage “stupidity” that is the liberation from typical gender roles (Sweney).

178 | 0 | 1
Marianopolis College
by ColdWater on February 24, 2017
From the first Barbie in 1959 to the millions of advertisements in the 21st century, women have never been portrayed or conveyed in the way that they should be. Not only is it common for women to be considered and used as objects in commercials, flyers, and billboards in North America, but it is also frequent in South America. Kitadol is a medicine company out of Chile that released an advertisement in April of 2013 of an objectified woman lifting weights in a gym while being touched by two men and stared at by three other men, as if they have complete power over her.

92 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Randy Lahey on February 24, 2017
According to this advertisement if you want to be prepared for summer time activities like going to the beach your body must be as disturbingly thin as this woman's and to achieve this you can purchase this company's protein bars instead of eating regular meals. Whoa, please tell me I miss analised this! Nope, I did not, this is clearly the message this company is trying to convey to women and it is absolutely terrifying.  

118 | 1 | 0
Marianopolis College
by 1010710 on February 24, 2017
The Objectification and Sexualization of Women in Natan Couture's Advertisements

109 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by theboss_25 on February 24, 2017
In today’s society, advertisements have gone way too far. From food ads to clothing ads, they all convey a negative and unrealistic image of our society and especially of women. A great example of a problematic advertisement had been published by Burger King. The “It’ll blow your mind away” ad is very controversial due to its objectification of women. 

89 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by VIEW5 on February 24, 2017
Unilever is an Anglo-Dutch company based in the UK and the Netherlands. Among the many products Unilever produces, it is the advertising for their personal care product, Lynx Dry Antiperspirant Spray that has seen much backlash. Simply put, the ad is a terribly sexist representation of women today. The ad prominently features a woman half nude in a kitchen putting a turkey in the oven. This instantly conveys the cliché message that women “belong in the kitchen”.

53 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by janedoe on February 24, 2017
In the advertisement by Tom Ford, a naked woman is seen combing a man’s hair. He is well-dressed, in a suit and bowtie, while flaunting Tom Ford’s designer glasses. He looks directly into the camera, while the female model’s gaze is downturned, seemingly concentrating on perfecting the pristine part in his hairline. What is particularly eye-catching is her half-exposed breasts and her obvious tan line. There are multiple sexist messages implied within the ad.

98 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by chocolate12345 on February 24, 2017
American Apparel is a clothing company known for its scandalous and provocative advertisements featuring young, mostly female, scantily clad models. Several of its advertisements have been criticized for their vulgarity and the negative implicit messages they transmit. One particular advertisement for underwear released in 2006 features a rear view of a woman kneeling on a bed in her underwear and knee-high socks.

87 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by dustydonald on February 24, 2017
    Analyzing an Ad: Women in the Media http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/24/ford-india-figo-ad-bound-and-gagged-women_n_2941297.html  

70 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by Student98 on February 24, 2017
       For as long as we can remember, society has taught us about gender. Through a variety of forms of media, we have learnt how men and women should look and behave. Advertisements play a major role in educating society on gender identity. Though this may seem harmless, we tend not to analyze the messages we are told in detail. What is it exactly that we are being taught to think in regards of gender identity? The denim jeans advertisement by Alexander Wang is as example that shows how advertisements corrupt society’s perception of gender identities.

67 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by LilChanofrom79th on February 24, 2017
In 2008, the world-famous German automaker BMW released an ad for its pre-owned vehicle division that came under much criticism. The focal point of the ad is a close-up picture of an attractive woman making a seductive face at the camera. Below that, the tagline reads: “You know you’re not the first”. In its proper context this statement refers to the reader not being the first to drive a pre-owned BMW, and the sexual connotations of the tagline refer to the reader not being the first to engage in sexual activities with the woman, but both imply that the reader would enjoy it anyway.

84 | 0 | 0
Marianopolis College
by grace on February 24, 2017
When thinking of shower gels, hygiene and cleanliness are typically the first words that come to mind. However, Axe’s promotion of its new grooming product will make you think otherwise. According to its advertisement published in 2012, “the cleaner you are, the dirtier you get.”  

110 | 0 | 0
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Teacher

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
1 month 2 weeks ago

You bring up lots of really good arguments with many examples. At the beginning, you mentioned that video games illustrate many gender stereotypes, but it’s important to understand how gender representations in video games can have a major impact on our society today.

In many video games, men and women are portrayed as their ideal body types. For men, that means they are physically strong, have six-pack abs, a muscular body, an aggressive facial expression and that they are often white. On the other hand, women are pictured as weak, passive, sexual and are often seen wearing extremely revealing clothing. It has become common for gamers to associate men as the strong players and women as the weaker players in a video game. This is because the male characters are presented as more dominant, violent and powerful. It's also important to consider that these video games can also normalize these gender assumptions and for it to be seen as humor. We can see this through the rape mod in Grand Theft Auto 5 which promoted rape and sexual assault against women. Furthermore, women in the video game industry are also misrepresented. #Gamergate is a movement in defense of journalistic integrity and ethical practices in the video game industry that mainly targeted women. All in all, like advertisements, music and films, video games also have an important role in teaching future generations how we should think of gender in our society. While changes are being made, these changes are not being made quick enough or that they still show some forms of gender inequalities.

If you're interested in reading more, have a look on http://www.radford.edu/~mzorrilla2/thesis/gamerepresentation.html.

1 month 2 weeks ago

You bring up some good points in this article. Like many, I think that it might not be beneficial for people who are struggling to watch 13 Reasons Why. But in addition, I would like to bring up the gender stereotype that the movie also portrays and how it can tie in with teen suicide rates.

In this television series, Hannah Baker is the character that goes through a lot of struggles and eventually commits suicide. Coincidentally, she is a teenage girl and statistics show us that females attempt suicide 3 times more than males. However, 78% of suicides are actually done by males. About half of male suicides are done with firearms in effort to show violence to prove their masculinity whereas females are more likely to use drugs. It’s important to understand how gender can come into play and affect the struggles that come with the expectations of our society. In the movie, it’s apparent that many of Hannah’s problems involve her relationships with other guys. A sexual script is a narrative that tells us what exactly we’re supposed to do when it comes to sexuality and is commonly learned through popular culture and conversations around us. The Netflix series teaches us how to act according to gender and also deals with issues like sexual assault which depict the roles of men and women as subjects and objects in our society.

Read this The Guardian article on the gender and suicide: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jan/21/suicide-gender-men-women...

1 month 3 weeks ago

This is a really well written text with many good points!

Women must be physically attractive in South Korea in order to have a successful marriage and to be proven worthy in the job market, and if they are not, they are encouraged to get plastic surgery. This promotes the idea that women are treated like objects that should be used for men's pleasure in our patriarchal society. Nowadays, there is something known as double consciousness in which it is used to describe a minority individual who is a part of two cultures and having two identities, but constantly shifting between the two. For instance, plastic surgery is very common in South Korea to the point where 1 in 5 women will have cosmetic surgery as you mentioned. They must contend with the stereotypes that are created with being an East Asian individual as well as being a woman which includes having the perfect body. They are also being labeled as the model minority which many believe to be a positive stereotype. However, men and women are actually being subjected to an overwhelming pressure to conform to the high expectations. In different parts of the world, women and men alike will face many struggles that come with their double consciousness. For instance, black men are expected to conform to man box as well as the stereotypes that exist like hypersexual, violent or criminal which puts them at a disadvantage. This gives them a unique experience as they are in a position that intersects privilege and marginalization.

Have a look at this article that further discusses the issue of double consciousness: http://saalt.org/double-consciousness-of-the-south-asian-identity/

2 months 3 weeks ago

I would like to start off by pointing out how intriguing your argument and post is. This is a despicable problem that still exists and it should be dealt with right away.

I would like to introduce a concept that may help you see this issue through a different lens. This concept is called intersectionality. Intersectionality refers to the way different kinds of oppression among minority groups overlap and reinforce each other. This idea is typically describes as the “hat game”. This insinuates that different minority groups need to emphasize different identities in different settings. Let’s take an African American Jew for example. In a setting with other Jews, this man would accentuate his Jewish characteristics. In a setting with other African Americans on the other hand, said man would need to play out his African American distinctiveness more.

The way that Intersectionality relates to your post is all about setting. In different settings, different minority groups get different treatment. For example, being African American around cops, being Asian while applying for school, being Muslim in an airport or a woman in a corporate setting would all suggest discrimination. Taking your example where the setting is in India, it is understood that Woman’s rights there are very minimal. With that being said, Intersectionality plays a role in why women are being objectified and used for human trafficking.

If you would like to read a bit more on Woman’s conditions in India, here is a link: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-20863860

2 months 3 weeks ago

I found your article very interesting and well structured. I agree that this is a very serious issue among women which should be addressed, but let’s not forget that men struggle with these issues as well. It is called the “Adonis” figure. Adonis is a term used to describe the ideal image of male beauty. That would be tall, muscular, straight, with a full head of hair and long legs. Just like women, men are expected to live up to these impossible standards. This struggle is different for men however, and less addressed in the media when speaking in terms of one being unhappy with their body because men generally have more avenues to power than females, beautiful or not. This correlates with the idea of hegemonic masculinity which promotes male dominance over women. Due to the fact that we still live in a very patriarchal society today the media, such as movies, TV shows, toys, social sites etc., not only promotes small, waifish, and submissive looking women but also big, strong, and tall men such as Chris Evans, Hugh Jackman, or Dwayne Johnson, also known as “The Rock” to reinforce this idea of patriarchy and hegemonic masculinity. Young boys and men watch these influential figures in movies, television shows and feel pressured to conform to the “man box” and live up to these standards as well. Here is a link to an article which further explains men and their body image anxiety due to media:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/11822364/Are-action-figures-giving...

2 months 3 weeks ago

Your article is very forward-looking, and pays attention to modern-day issues like the way social media distorts our perception of beauty and places too much importance on physical appearance. Your point about the "new power" initiative was especially innovative. New power is an important way in which people have overturned the way the media has targeted physical insecurities, all the while using the media to do it!
I do think however, that your article is biased toward female perception of the body, and female standards perpetrated by the media. You talk about the children who try to conform to Disney princesses' beauty standards but what about Prince charming? or Ken the barbie doll? This one-sided view on the harmful effects of the media regarding beauty standards fails to acknowledge that men too are affected. The ideal male body type is embodied in characters like Batman or Captain America – a concept that constricts male beauty to stature, strength and symmetrical facial features – and as a result glorifies machoness and muscular builds over any and all other body types. Furthermore, I do think you could have opened the conversation to include that the disconnect between the representation of women in the media and real-life women is much more common than the conversation about men in the media. Women tend to speak more openly about their insecurities for instance in magazines like Cosmo, where advice columns and opinion articles take up the subject of bodies and body shaming often. Whereas men are told that talking about their bodies is "abnormal", it is very rarely a topic which is addressed. Movements you have mentioned like the #IMNOANGEL campaign further bring attention to the impact on women and disregard men. I've come across one study that suggests men are just likely to be discontent with their bodies as women, like Susan Bordo argues in "Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body", this might lead to a rise in male eating disorders.

Here are a few links that could be helpful:
- Adonis Complex
https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=Jo-LHyyIy_kC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq...
- Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body by Susan Bordo
https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=rezqDU30R5wC&oi=fnd&pg=PR9&dq...

2 months 3 weeks ago

Your article is very forward-looking, and pays attention to modern-day issues like the way social media distorts our perception of beauty and places too much importance on physical appearance. Your point about the "new power" initiative was especially innovative. New power is an important way in which people have overturned the way the media has targeted physical insecurities, all the while using the media to do it!
I do think however, that your article is biased toward female perception of the body, and female standards perpetrated by the media. You talk about the children who try to conform to Disney princesses' beauty standards but what about Prince charming? or Ken the barbie doll? This one-sided view on the harmful effects of the media regarding beauty standards fails to acknowledge that men too are affected. The ideal male body type is embodied in characters like Batman or Captain America – a concept that constricts male beauty to stature, strength and symmetrical facial features – and as a result glorifies machoness and muscular builds over any and all other body types. Furthermore, I do think you could have opened the conversation to include that the disconnect between the representation of women in the media and real-life women is much more common than the conversation about men in the media. Women tend to speak more openly about their insecurities for instance in magazines like Cosmo, where advice columns and opinion articles take up the subject of bodies and body shaming often. Whereas men are told that talking about their bodies is "abnormal", it is very rarely a topic which is addressed. Movements you have mentioned like the #IMNOANGEL campaign further bring attention to the impact on women and disregard men. I've come across one study that suggests men are just likely to be discontent with their bodies as women, like Susan Bordo argues in "Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body", this might lead to a rise in male eating disorders.

Here are a few links that could be helpful:
- Adonis Complex
https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=Jo-LHyyIy_kC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq...
- Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body by Susan Bordo
https://books.google.ca/bookshl=en&lr=&id=rezqDU30R5wC&oi=fnd&pg=PR9&dq=...

2 months 3 weeks ago

What you’re doing is absolutely great, we really need more people to support this cause since there is a large amount of cases surrounding sexual assaults. There is no justice whatsoever in what’s happening these days, all these cases are being turned down are just making the idea of rape culture grow bigger and bigger. Rape culture is a set of beliefs which encourages the violence against women and male sexual aggression. Many women are currently suffering from sexual abuse and no one is standing up to it, if the judges in court are not reacting and saying things like “vigorous or creative enough in trying to stop the assault” then it will only get worse from here and people will try to assault others even more. Also, imagine women of color trying to stand up for themselves at court and being shut down, society will never be able to improve because of this. So we really need more people to join these organizations to help women reach out and stand up for themselves.

Here is an article that talks about how the victims are being blamed for rape instead of the rapists
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/womens-blog/2014/nov/21/police-...

2 months 3 weeks ago

What you’re doing is absolutely great, we really need more people to support this cause since there is a large amount of cases surrounding sexual assaults. There is no justice whatsoever in what’s happening these days, all these cases are being turned down are just making the idea of rape culture grow bigger and bigger. Rape culture is a set of beliefs which encourages the violence against women and male sexual aggression. Many women are currently suffering from sexual abuse and no one is standing up to it, if the judges in court are not reacting and saying things like “vigorous or creative enough in trying to stop the assault” then it will only get worse from here and people will try to assault others even more. Also, imagine women of color trying to stand up for themselves at court and being shut down, society will never be able to improve because of this. So we really need more people to join these organizations to help women reach out and stand up for themselves.

Here is an article that talks about how the victims are being blamed for rape instead of the rapists
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/womens-blog/2014/nov/21/police-...

2 months 3 weeks ago

Interesting read! I tend to agree with your points about how internet moderation is important however, in addition to the points that you have made, I believe a strong case can be made for looking at this situation from a gendered perspective. In today’s society, a lot of activism for a wide range of causes can be found on the internet. One predominate activist topic, for both positive and negative reasons, is feminism. The fact that anyone can hide behind a computer and express their thoughts anonymously is a very beneficial tool to every person who is worried about being harassed or abused because of them, but sometimes these situations do arise.

Most notably, in 2014 a rise in online Feminism emerged after a series of world events revolving the mistreatment of women. For months at a time, Twitter was flooded with trending hashtags such as #WhyIStayed, #YesAllWomen, and #ChangeTheRatio. This strong sense of community on the internet that empowers women to tell their stories in an environment where they can express themselves in a safe and protected environment has proven to be very beneficial in raising awareness of certain social issues.

Unfortunately, with this rise in awareness of feminism and feminist ideologies also comes a rise in anti-feminism. There is a large community of people on the internet who use the anonymity and the protection of the internet to harass and bully the people who express their beliefs online. Examples of this can be found most notable in the Gamergate scandal, which involved a group of women who were continuously harassed by the online community for speaking out about inequality in video games, and in a particular situation in California in which a man would create fake social media identities in order to harass women.

From a gendered perspective, complete internet privacy would be beneficial to a certain group of people because it would create an environment where people can speak out about their experiences with absolutely no fear of harassment. Contrarily, allowing the internet to be thoroughly monitored would be very beneficial in reducing online harassment of all sorts. It is just up to the government to figure out what is more important.

If you are interested in reading more about this subject, I have attached a link to an article about Gamergate to get you started: http://www.inc.com/magazine/201504/david-whitford/gamergate-why-would-an...

There no collaborative classes

About the author

Institution