Gendered World Views (Winter 2017, section 11)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be nice – we then assign an aesthetic to each group that reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will introduce students to the patriarchal world view that created the gendered stereotypes we live with today and the ways in which gendered assumptions structure society. We will then focus on the challenges that have been raised by the feminist world view and explore how women deal with gender inequality. The second half of the course will be largely dedicated to masculinity studies and feminist observations regarding how the patriarchal world view hurts men as well. Finally, we will end with a brief look at what queer theory has to say about gender. Students will be asked to reflect on their own world views and how gendered ideas have effected their lives. A participation grade will be assigned.

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by Tulips123 on February 27, 2017
For years’ women have been represented in one way, the looks may vary, but themessage remains the same, “Women will not be desirable to, or loved by men unless they are physically perfect.” (Cortes 10) Through every medium; entertainment, sports and even foodwomen are fed messages on what they must look, how they must dress and how to pleasemen. The ultimate representation of these messages is

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by rachelwhite on February 27, 2017
Carl’s Jr. is an American fast food chain known for its controversial commercials that objectify women in order to sell its products. In this particular ad, the now very famous model Charlotte McKinney walks around in a food market completely nude; flaunting her gorgeous and “perfect” body while all the men at the market stare at her. At the end of the ad [the image inserted above], the blonde bombshell wears very little clothing, accentuating her cleavage while holding an abnormally large hamburger in her hand and then takes a big bite out of it.

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by rachelwhite on February 27, 2017
Carl’s Jr. is an American fast food chain known for its controversial commercials that objectify women in order to sell its products. In this particular ad, the now very famous model Charlotte McKinney walks around in a food market completely nude; flaunting her gorgeous and “perfect” body while all the men at the market stare at her. At the end of the ad [the image inserted above], the blonde bombshell wears very little clothing, accentuating her cleavage while holding an abnormally large hamburger in her hand and then takes a big bite out of it.

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by anonymous13579 on February 27, 2017
     The Suit Supply company has been known for many of its controversial ads, here I will only be discussing three of which I found to be more degrading towards women. The goal of these ads from the company is to advertise their product which are suits. In all three images, we do see a well-dressed man (or two) but the problem is how the female companion is portrayed.

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by arimonkey on February 27, 2017
Sex sells, and it’s no secret that advertisers take advantage of this fact. After just a look at the advertisements for some of today’s most popular brands, one can almost effortlessly conclude that a large number of them use sexual images to grasp their viewers’ attention. However, this is not the only conclusion one can draw from observing these ads, the other being that many of them sexually objectify the female figure featured in them.

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by ting ting on February 27, 2017
In this advertisement, one can see two children modeling Gap Kids clothing. Though this ad is not the typical ad used when analyzing the sexism that can be found in advertisements, this is a gross example of how the sexism of society does not only exist when looking at ads targeted to adults but also to ads targeted at young children. There are many reasons as to why this ad is problematic. Those reasons are detrimental to societal views of women and will continue the cycle of women being objects and lesser than men.

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by Margarita on February 26, 2017
This advertisement for men’s suits is a part of the 2016 marketing campaign by the Amsterdam-based company Suitsupply. The images from this campaign feature oversized and underdressed women accompanied by tiny men wearing the company’s line of suits. The company has been criticized before for promoting sexist ideals and the objectification of women, however, this time the company’s CEO, Fokke de Jong, defended the images by claiming that they were “sexist towards men” since they objectified the male models (Moss).

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by Shing on February 26, 2017
In this miu miu Spring 2015 advertisement which is already banned in UK, a young thin female model in a beautiful cloth carrying a miu miu bag is lying on the bed in a small room. This model looks like a little girl.Her pretty clothes and shoes are both with bowknots. It makes her looks similar to a doll. The sight of the photographer seems look through a door to this girl. Moreover, rather than opening wide, the door is more likely to be opened furtively because the bright part which the model occupies is only the half of the image.

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by appi90 on February 26, 2017
About 10 years ago, Dove launched its Campaign for Real Beauty that featured a woman’s unique differences in using models of various body types and races. Introduced in 2004, the advertising campaign was a response to the fact that globally only 2% of women truly believed that they were beautiful (Celebre, Delton, Guadagno, & Wal 2014). Thus, Dove aimed to promote the notion that a woman’s body should be celebrated for its real curves and colors rather than be made a source of anxiety and lack of confidence.

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4 years 9 months ago

I really enjoyed the honesty of your article, it gave the reader a real glimpse at what

homosexual men in less developed have to deal with. The fact that you included the full article

on this story made your analysis much stronger because the reader can see information about

this issue in detail.

It may be helpful to look at the issue of homosexual men’s human rights being violated

from a gendered perspective. In your article there is a theme that you touch upon very often,

people seem to be afraid of homosexuality. the government and society in Africa seems to be

afraid of emasculation of their male population. The term hegemonic masculinity illustrates this

idea perfectly, hegemonic masculinity promotes male dominance and obeying the “man box”.

This type of masculinity tells men to be everything women are not. This very popular idea of

how men should act explains why the fear of homosexuality is there. The fact that being

homosexual man is so closely associated with being female causes this type of harm.

It might be helpful to read this article from Colorado State University

http://www.wps.colostate.edu/men-and-masculinities . This article gives a further explanation of

the man box as well as more detail on hegemonic masculinity.

4 years 9 months ago

You have obviously demonstrated your understanding of the topic. I like how you included some pertinent statistics since they really proved the gravity of the subject and helped prove your point. Furthermore, the fact that you included a real example helped the reader understand explicitly how indigenous women are treated.

To further strengthen your argument, I would consider explaining intersectionality more in depth and exactly how this concept relates to the numerous disappearances and murders of indigenous women and how their cases are treated. Intersectionality describes the overlapping and reinforcement of different systems of oppression, inequality, or discrimination. A few reasons why we sometimes oppress beyond gender are race, sexual orientation, class, age, religion, etc. This concept was developed by third-wave feminists and proves that all women do not struggle against the same kinds of oppression or feel it in the same way contrarily to what traditional feminists claimed. In this case, indigenous women show how race and gender intersect creating serious issues. Whilst the fights of indigenous women are related to ongoing feminist struggles within other racially marginalized groups, they are not the same. A crucial aspect of indigenous activism includes the fight for self-determination and recognition. Indigenous people around the world are fighting to maintain control over their identities, cultures, and ancestral land, a struggle that is integral to many indigenous women. Furthermore, a white woman generally does not have to worry about healthcare and other services being accessible to them. Here is a paper that analyses how indigeneity intersects with cultural marginalization and violence: https://www.lakeheadu.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/92/An%20Intersectio.... To sum it up, sexism isn't the only force of discrimination so we need to consider the many markers when determining how much bigotry they suffer from. Recognizing the complexity of female experiences is critical to avoid generalizing them as the same for everyone.

4 years 9 months ago

This was a very informative text on homelessness and the disciplines related to it. Unfortunately homelessness is extremely common, and there are certain demographics that are more at risk of living on the streets than others. This can be related to the term intersectionality, which can be defined as the overlapping of a person’s identities that give them either more or less advantage compared to others. In regards to homelessness, intersectionality plays an important role in determining how at risk a person is to become homeless; it also can help predict whether or not a homeless person will struggle to improve their living standards. For example, an older man from a lower economic background will be much more likely to become homeless for a long period of time than a middle-aged white man from a middle or upper class family. Women on the other hand tend to find a home more quickly, however they are more at risk of sexual assault and verbal abuse. Their race, age, and economic background also play a part in determining their chances of living on the streets. If you wish to verify my facts or learn more about intersectionality and homelessness, you can do so here: http://www.tcs.cam.ac.uk/features/0036999-the-long-read-intersectional-h....

4 years 9 months ago

Not only did your title catch my attention, but your post was also very informative. In fact, I have never heard of an anti-trolling program that could regulate toxic contents like Google’s Perspective before. It is always so interesting to see what technology is able to accomplish. Looking at this text through a gendered perspective, I feel like this issue mainly addresses to third-wave feminists. In fact, the invention of the internet was supposed to help realize the third-wave dream: a place where people with different intersectional background can have a voice in anonymity. However, one of the biggest obstacle to this plan has been the internet trolls. Very quickly, their misogynistic posts bloomed in the cyberspace and turned the third wave dream into a virtual battle ground. There was this case where a 27 years old man who had a history of abusing women through social media tried to lure a feminist woman in real life through a fake online advertisement. This specific situation shows how severe internet trolling can get. Therefore, it is important to take in gender perspective in consideration when dealing with internet trolling, because the third-wave feminism has a major role to play in it.

Anyway, if you want more information about the third-wave feminism, here is a link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third-wave_feminism

4 years 9 months ago

Currently, this is an important discussion in sports and you handled the notions of concussions and head injuries thoroughly in your post. You equally mention some of the solutions to this problem, which adds convincing personal insight and sparks hope for some future change in the sports industry.

It was particularly rattling to note that only a small percentage of players knew that they had a concussion, which not only brings about the notion of awareness like you said, but it is also important to note how much of this mentality comes from the notions of hegemonic masculinity. This concept is the promotion of male dominance by conforming to what society deems to be properly masculine. From a gendered point of view, sports are closely tied with men proving their masculinity; daily chants of “no pain, no gain” create a culture of silence in the men. A toxic situation begins to form; they learn from an early age that pain should be overcome to get back on the field or risk losing a place on the team. Thus, injury becomes a direct attack on their ability to be able-bodied men who are expected to actively use their strong male bodies, no matter their health condition. Although this is a social construct, it becomes a form of truth when repeated countless times in locker rooms and other locations where hard-hitting misogynistic thoughts police men into conformity.

Although sports are an arena where this dominant masculinity is frequently expressed, its effects leak out into the regular lives of many athletes leading to charges of sexual assault, domestic violence and, in some cases, murder. Nonetheless, the consequences they face are minimal; for instance, suspension from a few games. Although this is nothing but human invention, social constructs have created a world of hegemonic masculinity where male dominance through the assertion of violence and aggression is normal while accepting pain and injury is a sign of weakness associated with femininity.

Overall, I agree that awareness needs to be raised about the frequency of concussions, but equal attention needs to be given to the social definition of masculinity and the obligation to conform. If you are interested in the concept of hegemonic masculinity as a social construct and its expression in sports, the following is a link about some discussions and theories surrounding the issue: https://emilymayclark.wordpress.com/2012/02/08/go-hard-or-go-home-how-ha...

4 years 9 months ago

I enjoyed your article, you brought up some relevant points regarding homophobia in our society today. The world has changed a lot in the past 50 years and has become much more accepting of the homosexual community. However, even though the world has changed there is still the idea of the patriarchal world view, and heterosexuality being the correct sexuality for men and women. Men especially are pressured by society to be heterosexual, and this is called compulsive heterosexuality. Compulsive heterosexuality the idea that men do not have their own sexual identity, they all are/need to be heterosexual. It lacks pleasure and denies men their true needs. It says that men need have a lot of sex with multiple women, they must have an intense libido, and there is no emotion involved with the women. Furthermore, all heterosexual men must avoid all contact from the gay community. For example, if a heterosexual man seen as attractive by a homosexual man, it objectifies him and challenges his masculinity. This then leads to the avoidance of gay people, and contributes to the ongoing issue of discrimination and homophobia. Although some men might do this unconsciously, it helps support the idea that though society has changed and advanced, there are still issues that need to be addressed regarding the acceptance of all sexuality and sexual identities.

Here is an article on compulsive heterosexuality that you might find interesting:
https://genderpressing.wordpress.com/category/compulsory-heterosexuality/

4 years 9 months ago

A very mind-opening article on this issue! I enjoy how you show how three concepts regarding homophobia intersect to clarify and justify how homophobia can be fought. The concept of sociology you have mentioned may heavily relate to the analysis of the concept of social constructs.

Social constructs are where experiences and assumptions about civilization create labels and categories for all aspects of society. For example, hegemonic masculinity is a label as a result of the social construct of the patriarchy, where men must be strong, stoic, and much more. Due to the patriarchy and hegemonic masculinity, men have been deemed as sexual subjects. From the psychology behind the role of performing sexuality, men must desire women and cannot be desired. Therefore, by being desired by another man, the objectified man is put into a subordinate position, thus causing him to question his masculinity. Looking through a gendered lens, it can be seen that homophobia may be a result in the fear of not performing to the capacity of hegemonic masculinity. It is not to say that other factors such as religion, location, government and other factors have caused homophobia as well. Although, homophobia, like all opinions and values, are a result of influences and experiences one lives. Thus, homophobia throughout time with the help of hegemonic masculinity may cause certain men to distance themselves from any factor that could result in femininity, like being penetrated and being objectified. As these factors may seem to over exaggerate, this suggests a more complex reason to why homophobia has not been already completely removed from society.

This issue can be looked further into how lacking “power” over another man by being desired is used in sports to police men to be more violent and aggressive. As this issue can be discussed further, I would like to congratulate your article as it was very enlightening on this subject. Finally, again, I heavily enjoyed reading your article as it was very informative on the reasons of homophobia, allowing one to think further into this issue.

Terms:
Social Construct: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_constructionism
Hegemonic Masculinity: http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1149&context=artspapers
Patriarchal Society: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriarchy
Sexual subject vs object: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_4dPB9MVS8
Performing sexuality in terms of social roles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Role
Policing: http://juricana-juricana.blogspot.ca/2012/10/social-policing.html

4 years 9 months ago

Hi!
Your article reflects an important issue in our present day. It was very perceptive of you to show the negative side (flaws in the law system and the outcome of the trial), but also a positive side of this case (fewer frequencies of victim blaming and more women speaking out on their sexual assault).
Your article reveals the problematic underlying culture in our society, specifically the rape culture. Rape culture is defined by the trivialization of the act of raping and making sexual violence against women seem okay, namely by blaming the victim and defending the perpetrator. A few key points you mentioned refers directly to this: Jian Gomeshi bragging about his misconduct, the organization manager telling the complainer to watch her dress code, and finally, the evasion of a second trial as well as the release of the perpetuator. It is true that the Canadian court system needs improvement, such as you stated, but I think we should look at this, not as a flawed law system, but rather something much deeper anchored in our society, in our culture. And because this rape culture can only strive when each person is a participant in this culture, to avoid cases like Jian Gomeshi’s again, we must start making changes in our own conduct, our own homes. I invite you to read this article on how to end this rape culture: https://www.thenation.com/article/ten-things-end-rape-culture/

4 years 9 months ago

Very good article!! It is evident that you have done extensive research on this subject and that you understand it well! You are also very eloquent. I believe though, that there is a way that you can improve your article even more! Adding at least a paragraph that looks at this issue through a gendered lens would be extremely beneficial.
It is a fact that one of the reasons that there are less African American students in predominantly white institutions because they do not feel comfortable going to these schools and one has to wonder exactly why. Take for example black men. Many stereotypes surrounding this group of our society are that they are violent and criminals. Because of this they chose not to insert themselves into any potential situations in which they have to deal with these stereotypes.
But when looking at the black males that do go to these schools, one can see that the idea of them having a double conscious is a reality. This can be described as black people having to navigate between being someone that white people would accept and their actual black selves.
For more information on double consciousness go to: http://kristindoestheory.umwblogs.org/understanding-w-e-b-du-bois-concep...
Because of this, even more black males chose not to go to these PWIs creating an even nasty cycle of under representation.

4 years 9 months ago

I really enjoyed your “sharing is caring” approach, referring to the fact that rape victims should share their stories in order to move forward. I agree that these victims are in dire need of support, and this is a way of giving them this, while at the same time raising awareness about rape and how frequently it occurs. However, as much as I agree that supporting victims is important, I do not believe that this is the best solution to solve the issue of rape. For one, looking at it from a more gendered lens, women are more likely to be victims of rape than men, and this is because we live in a rape culture. Therefore, women are often objectified, and sexual assault towards them is trivialized by many. As well, it is considered normal for men to treat women as sexual objects, and they are frequently praised for doing so. In my opinion, this is unacceptable. So, instead of focusing all our attention on victims after the fact, it would also be necessary to devote time to preventing the horrendous event from occurring in the first place. Back to your idea of “sharing is caring”, I think that women can sensitize people to the idea of rape by sharing their story. However, it is vital that we also teach people that sexually objectifying and assaulting women is not something that should be taken as lightly as it often is.

I invite you to read this article which goes more in depth in explaining rape culture:
http://www.wavaw.ca/what-is-rape-culture/

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