Gendered World Views (section 8, Fall 2015)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be nice – we then assign an aesthetic to each group that reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will introduce students to the patriarchal world view that created the gendered stereotypes we live with today and the ways in which gendered assumptions structure society. We will then focus on the challenges that have been raised by the feminist world view and explore how women deal with gender inequality. The second half of the course will be largely dedicated to masculinity studies and feminist observations regarding how the patriarchal world view hurts men as well. Finally, we will end with a brief look at what the queer world view has to say about gender. Students will be asked to reflect on their own world views and how gendered ideas have effected their lives. A participation grade will be assigned.

Marianopolis College
by student9718 on October 23, 2015
          The article “Mass Killing in the US: Masculinity, Masculinity, Masculinity” by Soraya Chemaly discusses the issues of mass murders committed by men in North America. Chemaly exposes the fact that, when talking about white male killers, there is an obvious pattern of wearing out the subject of guns and mental illness and never addressing the basis of the problem, hegemonic masculinity. This article is a forward step to a healthier masculinity as it pinpoints the roots of violence.  

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Marianopolis College
by 1013park on October 23, 2015
Many of women are the victims of the violence. According to Canadianwomen.org, half of women in Canada have experienced at least one incident of violence since the age of 16.There are two big types of violence, which are physical or either psychological. More specificly,we can also consider the sexual violence and verbal violence.

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Marianopolis College
by zen23 on October 23, 2015
The most beloved character in the science-fiction series of the 60's is Spock. Spock, half human half Vulcan, sets out on his lifetime goal of being a complete Vulcan, while suppressing the “human” side of him. In the article presented by a Doctor Douglas W. Texter, he first nicely introduces his anecdotes, then sets off on the characterization of Spock, with the historical context of the diminishing masculinity in the last forty years.

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Marianopolis College
by gwv_dxg on October 23, 2015
    George Fields Masculinity is about Dominance, and it’s a Good Thing argues that the characteristics of traditional masculinity are fundamental to what is it to be a man. He explains that manliness is violent, dominant and powerful but associates them in a way that is different to its conventional perception nowadays.

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Marianopolis College
by Carte Blanche on October 23, 2015
On October 19th, Justin Trudeau, age 43, got elected as prime minister of Canada and formed a majority liberal government. Like many other politicians and public figures, he too has faced many gender stereotypes and responded with other gender stereotypes. Soon after his win, the National Observer posted an article titled Justin Trudeau’s Fight For The Top online which highlighted Trudeau’s strategies and struggles throughout his campaign.

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Marianopolis College
by zxc1997 on October 22, 2015
In Robert Hogg’s article,” Masculinity and violence: the men who play rugby league,” he points out the fact that violence is seen as a nature of the game of rugby. The amount of violence involved in a game of rugby seems to be accepted by the general audience. Violence is also considered as a normal characteristic of masculinity. As the former New South Wales and Australian halfback Tommy Raudonikis suggests, Rugby league is a hard game played by hard men (Hogg).

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Marianopolis College
by Hippocampus on October 22, 2015
Following the successful premium of his short ballet choreography, The Blue of Distance, Robert Binet, aged 24, speaks of his current project, an adaptation of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, and his goals as a ballet dancer and choreographer. He says that ballet expresses emotions with a clarity that no other physical performance can do, so he wants to preserve this art and revive it with contemporary values, that is to break the gendered perspective of this art.

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Marianopolis College
by perfectlypunctual on October 22, 2015
The article I chose to analyze today focuses on the Dawson College shooting that happened on September 13th, 2006 in Montreal, leaving one woman dead and 19 others injured. CBCnews Canada posted the article the day after the tragic incident occurred, where we are informed about the immediate impact the crime had on the college and its students. Not only did the atrocious episode affect the school, but also sent the entire city into terror-stricken mayhem.

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Marianopolis College
by Autumn_Willow_2015 on October 22, 2015
Craig and Marc Kielburger’s article We Need to Talk about Toxic Masculinity http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/craig-and-marc-kielburger/the-mask-you-live-in_b_6852002.html discusses the mask of stoicism that society forces on to the true faces of young boys. Its title indicates the urgency to remedy the overlying issue of toxic masculinity.

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Marianopolis College
by Jake049 on October 22, 2015
Soraya Chemaly’s article “Mass Killings in the US: Masculinity, Masculinity, Masculinity” analyses the reasoning of the perpetrators of mass shootings in the U.S. The author does so by exploring the link between several of the past shooters’ manifestos with their choices of target and the source of the need of these men to be violent.

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Marianopolis College
by jessykhoury on October 22, 2015
This article presents many theories as to why men are so violent. The author argues that men are expected to act in violent behaviors because they are pressured by social media, and most importantly other men. If some men exercise “softer” masculinities, they can be discriminated, punished and even socially excluded. Hegemonic masculinity proves that in a patriarchal society, men don’t only practice violence on women, but also on [weaker] men.

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Marianopolis College
by jessykhoury on October 22, 2015
This article presents many theories as to why men are so violent. The author argues that men are expected to act in violent behaviors because they are pressured by social media, and most importantly other men. If some men exercise “softer” masculinities, they can be discriminated, punished and even socially excluded. Hegemonic masculinity proves that in a patriarchal society, men don’t only practice violence on women, but also on [weaker] men.

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Marianopolis College
by Asanta08 on October 22, 2015
On April 20, 1999, two boys Eric Harris 18 years old and Dylan Klebold 17 years old went into their high school with automatic weapons and sought revenge on the innocent students. Sadly thirteen people were murdered that day, with hundreds of people who were injured, physically and or mentally. 

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Marianopolis College
by princess on October 22, 2015
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/sep/29/piggate-hazing-fraternity-rituals-psychology   The article “Hazing, #piggate and other secret rites: the psychology of extreme group rituals” deconstructs the psychology behind male group initiation rituals, mostly focusing on those practiced at prestigious British and American universities.

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Marianopolis College
by 1530880 on October 22, 2015
In this article, Mad Men, Monsters and Misogynist, the author describes the effect of the patriarchal world view and its effect on men. He starts by listing some horrible acts that were committed in the United-States. Then, he goes on about abusive relationship saying that a woman has 70 times the chance of being killed by her ex-partner when she leave him than any other time in the relationship. Finally, he talks about #gamergate and how they aren’t really different from terrorist.

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Marianopolis College
by Provisional Polygon on October 22, 2015
This past August, a frat at Old Dominion University was suspended after some members displayed a series of banners with lewd phrases on them while freshman students moved onto campus.  The three banners read: "Rowdy and Fun. Hope your baby girl is ready for a good time," "Freshman daughter drop off," and "Go ahead and drop off mom too." This article is from CNN, but the story has been picked up by many other news organizations, mainly due to the controversy that has arisen online from feminist objections connecting this incident to rape culture, but why does rape culture exist?

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Marianopolis College
by furp97 on October 22, 2015
Raised in a patriarchal world of superficial advertisements and mass media, many fail to recognize that men are also negatively influenced and affected by societal norms and gender stereotypes, as opposed to only women. One of these individuals myself, it is not surprising that I had only noticed the underlined impact of Martin Chilton’s Die Hard (1988) film review for the Telegraph after viewing Jackson Katz’s film Tough Guise 2.0.

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2 years 6 months ago

Your post points out a problem as it illustrates an acceptance of an inappropriate practice based on our cultural standards, and I am with you in the outrage against it. However, our critique is valid from our frame of reference and it is worth noting that we live in a completely different culture here in North America then one might be accustomed to in Russia.
Looking at this situation from a relativistic ethics point of view, it can be argued that since we do not live in Russia, we are in no position to criticize or speak out against laws that affect living in Russia. In other words, ethical relativism is a moral theory in which different cultures have different ideas about morality and one is not considered better than the other. Different cultural groups have established a set of moral values, which drive what they consider socially correct or incorrect. From the point of view of the Russian culture, perhaps disciplining children is seen as an important value and different methods are used to attain this than would be used in the North American culture. It is important to recognize that belonging to a different cultural moral group may mean having a differing idea of what is moral and what is not. Therefore, our opinions about what we call domestic violence in Russia may be considered biased and invalid because we live in a North American moral system.
This is not to say that you are wrong in criticizing this law, which may have implications for your family back home, it is just to realize that before critiquing others, it is important to consider it from multiple perspectives in order to better understand the situation.

3 years 9 months ago

I really like this post because it is something that nowadays is more often discussed but there is a minority of people who actually do check their privilege or admit to it. I have had so many people even be offended by this word and took it as an insult when I would tell them to "check their privilege." Not checking and acknowledging one's privilege helps ignore the presence of any kind of oppression and reinforces it by shoving the social privileges that exist in this world under the rug and pretending as if they do not exist. How will racism or any other type of discrimination in that matter cease or get better if people don't even know or want to admit that it exists. "Check your privilege" isn't a sentence used to insult a person but asking them to be, as a majority, to be more sensitive and aware of the problems minorities have to face. Also, checking your privilege is a way easier and better place to be than actually facing everyday discrimination, so people should stop being so insulted.

I think checking your privilege is a self-diagnosis and definite cure to racism. It is actually the first step to combatting it because racism cannot be cured if people don't acknowledge its effects and problems. Also, there cannot only be minorities that combat racism for there to be no more racism because we need these majorities to be conscious of their privileges and try to make a world an equal fair place for everybody. I can link this to feminism as second wave feminists wanted to start to enlarge their group and social network by including black feminists, but the black feminists didn't want to join because their problems at that time with slavery and the conditions they had to live with were very different and much worse than the conditions that white women who were in charge of the second wave movement had to deal with. Some white feminists actually dared compare their problems to those of african american women saying that they too were considered objects by their husbands. Although, the conditions of women at that time were awful and indeed something to fight for, it should not and can never be compared to the horrific unimaginable conditions african americans slaves had to live through. Even today we can find white feminists silencing black women while they declare injustices. One very good example is Taylor Swift telling Nicki Minaj that she shouldn't be pitting women against each other and that maybe it was men that were the problem and not race when Minaj commented on the fact that Anaconda wasn't nominated in the MTV VMA Awards because of race. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/taylor-swift-minaj-white-feminism_55... Taylor Swift is silencing a minority in oppression by saying that she is bad for pointing out racism in the Media because it puts women against each other. She is not letting her tell her story. She should definitely check her privilege.

3 years 9 months ago

I really liked this post because I could so much relate. I actually know a lot of people who have changed their last names and first names handing out their curriculum vitaes when in search for jobs. As people of color, we always have this doubt that maybe were weren't called back because of our race, which is completely explainable by the fact that we are in 2015, but still in a world where prejudice is still at its peak. I see a great danger in stereotyping names and changing names. I, myself, being asian, wanted to change names because I had been made fun of and humiliated numerous times because of it. My parents however refused to do so and I am so grateful because name changing is a big part of taking away your identity and your culture. A name is one of the first things that is truly yours and this name changing was a way to colonize countries. When the British colonized India and installed English schools in there for Indian people, the first thing the white English teachers did was assign them new English names. This reflects colonization, as it takes away a great part of you and your heritage.

3 years 9 months ago

I couldn't help but comment on your comment because I think you have all the right intentions as you see all people as people and that color shouldn't matter. However, it is not at all true that the color of someone's skin does not influence how they are represented in the media. You should remark that all the CEOs and people in high positions who have control over the media are mostly white men. These white men are the cause to the fact that there are a very few number female protagonists that are self-affirming and not objectified and that there are so very few complex roles for people of color. You should see the documentary "Miss Representation" by Jennifer Siebel Newsom that talks about this. There is an extremely small proportion of women and even smaller proportion of non white people who are in control of what we see on television shows and in the news. Next time you hear the news or read news articles, pay attention to the way they describe criminals of different color. When a white man is guilty of murder or violence, we try to pity the criminal by saying things like he was bullied, lonely, and depressed. We would talk about how he had a fine relationship with his parents and have testimonies of people saying that he was a nice, good boy and that they didn't expect this from him. Meanwhile, people of color, especially black people, are described as violent and talk about how they smoked. Even Michael Browne, who was actually the victim, not the criminal, was said on the news to have been, violent to have smoked and to have rapped. You might wonder how rapping is something that is relevant in this kind of situation but it is because it associates him with the stereotypical black man who raps , is violent and does drugs. A even more flagrant example: In France when the Charlie Hebdo incident happened, there were 12 french people who were killed, and at the same time in Nigeria, there was a mass killing lead by Boko Haram that killed up to 2000 people. However, there was no "I am Nigeria" international movement but a world-wide "I am Charlie" movement. How is it that the lives of 17 french people have had significantly more attention than the 2000 Nigerian lives. Can you still tell me that our media perceives all lives as having the same worth?

Also, for your question on the main point, I am not the writer of the post, but I think the whole message of her post was that media should have a more diverse representation of individuals and not just the stereotypical "white gay couple," because like you said, there are a lot of other people that are present in our society. The fact that the world is filled of different diverse people is the reason why minorities should not be underrepresented because not only white people exist in this world.

3 years 9 months ago

I couldn't help but comment on your comment because I think you have all the right intentions as you see all people as people and that color shouldn't matter. However, it is not at all true that the color of someone's skin does not influence how they are represented in the media. You should remark that all the CEOs and people in high positions who have control over the media are mostly white men. These white men are the cause to the fact that there are a very few number female protagonists that are self-affirming and not objectified and that there are so very few complex roles for people of color. You should see the documentary "Miss Representation" by Jennifer Siebel Newsom that talks about this. There is an extremely small proportion of women and even smaller proportion of non white people who are in control of what we see on television shows and in the news. Next time you hear the news or read news articles, pay attention to the way they describe criminals of different color. When a white man is guilty of murder or violence, we try to pity the criminal by saying things like he was bullied, lonely, and depressed. We would talk about how he had a fine relationship with his parents and have testimonies of people saying that he was a nice, good boy and that they didn't expect this from him. Meanwhile, people of color, especially black people, are described as violent and talk about how they smoked. Even Michael Browne, who was actually the victim, not the criminal, was said on the news to have been, violent to have smoked and to have rapped. You might wonder how rapping is something that is relevant in this kind of situation but it is because it associates him with the stereotypical black man who raps , is violent and does drugs. A even more flagrant example: In France when the Charlie Hebdo incident happened, there were 12 french people who were killed, and at the same time in Nigeria, there was a mass killing lead by Boko Haram that killed up to 2000 people. However, there was no "I am Nigeria" international movement but a world-wide "I am Charlie" movement. How is it that the lives of 17 french people have had significantly more attention than the 2000 Nigerian lives. Can you still tell me that our media perceives all lives as having the same worth?

Also, for your question on the main point, I am not the writer of the post, but I think the whole message of her post was that media should have a more diverse representation of individuals and not just the stereotypical "white gay couple," because like you said, there are a lot of other people that are present in our society. The fact that the world is filled of different diverse people is the reason why minorities should not be underrepresented because not only white people exist in this world.

3 years 9 months ago

Your article is really interesting to me as I, myself, am a person who has faced racism several times because of Canadian white teachers. I have not only had experienced implicit discrimination as white teachers actually thinking that black people are lazier and more inclined to crime, but also downright forward ones where teachers would actually make me the butt of the joke for my race. Oh yes! I have had teachers comment on my eastern asian eyes, making remarks on how they could barely see them and saying that Chinese people would invade the world and that everyone should scotch tape their eyes. Now that I think of it, it is no wonder that in my school, even in my group of friends, it wasn't reasonable for me to tell people that those kind of jokes were inappropriate, racist and hurtful. Teachers are doing it, so how could it be wrong? I would be called a person who couldn't take jokes and people, including teachers, had the guts to tell me that if these jokes bothered me this much, it must have been because I found some truth in them. This is the most preposterous thing I have heard but in some moments, I found myself believing them, which is pretty normal as my teacher, a figure of authority, a person who is supposed to be a role model, told me these things. What is very funny and sad about this is that these jokes and racist comments were made by my high school history teachers. These teachers teach us how civilization was brought up and make us reflect on the mistakes society has made and the solutions we could apply to make our society a better one. Not only does our european-centered history curriculum prevent us from connecting with our cultures, but history is presented to us by biased, racist teachers that devalourize for their ethnicity. I would not want to send my children to the kind of environment I had to live through, but I would because I don't believe home-schooling is the solution. African americans have fought so many years to simply sit in the same classroom as a white person and I, even though I am not an African American, am very grateful for their work as I too probably would not have been allowed the same education that I am if it weren't for them. By homeschooling, we are not in the same place as these white people, affirming our right to have the same education as them and prove them wrong about the stereotypes that are associated with us. It doesn't say in the law that black people are not allowed to study with them anymore, but the hostile environment they set up for people of colour forces them to separate themselves from white people. This all leads once again to segregation when white people and black people weren't allowed to be in the same room. I will send my children to the same schools that I have went to even though it means potential white racist teachers because it will make them stronger and fully aware that they have the same rights as all human beings and that they should seek their rights no matter what and speak up when there is an injustice. However, I don't think they will have to live through the same things I did because I have hope that the next generation will be a lot better and more conscious of making the world a truly better place and excepting everyone for who they are disregarding their race, sexuality or whatever. It will be full of teachers who are conscious about discrimination like you and allies of people who face oppression.

3 years 9 months ago

Hi, you have asked a very question and I think that there is not definite answer to it. In an optimistic point of view, if a "black" dancer works hard enough, he might be able to achieve success. I admit that it would be harder, but I think that once he becomes known, he would even make more sensation than Binet because he would be a better example of hard work and achievement. Another point to take into consideration is the social status of the people as ballet is an art closely related to the high-class society.

3 years 9 months ago

Your post definitely highlighted a great example of injustice stemming from racism present in our society. The fact that woman of colour have trouble appearing in the fashion industry is very upsetting; however, I think it is just as important to look at a deeper issue that exists in this problem. You said that Sudanese model Nykhor Paul expressed displeasure over her stylists not being prepared to work with coloured women by never having the correctly coloured makeup and not being able to handle their hair. What I would ask is why do women even have to have their hair done and put makeup on to put up an unrealistic façade of what beauty is in society’s eyes. The truth of our society is that we let our peers control what gender is and we let this gender control us. Gender is in fact a “social construct that is used to define how members of a particular sex are supposed to act” (Waurechen). It is the “behavioral, cultural or psychological traits typically associated with one sex which individuals belonging to one sex are supposed to perform” (Waurechen). What is important to note here is the fact that gender is a construct and that it is performed, meaning that someone or some groups of people are actually capable of controlling what society believes is “feminine and masculine”. In our current North American society this power is mainly in the hands of the media and big corporations that send media advertisements for products that further reinforce these constructs. From a young age, girls and boys can see on the television that men are to be strong, macho and powerful while woman are supposed to be pretty and docile. When these ideas constantly fill the mind of an innocent child, they grow up to believe that they must follow them and the cycle continues. The issue with this is the fact that most of these constructs are unhealthy and ultimately hurt the society at large who feels the pressure to adhere. Women and men (especially models) are forced to follow unrealistic ideal body standards and in order to do this they must often go through extreme dieting, exercising and some even resort to plastic surgery.
Essentially, what I am trying to say is that even though there exists a problem with race in the modelling industry, the root problem in the industry is the way in which models are forced to adhere to impractical beauty standards which not only hurt them physically but also psychologically. If you want to read more about the great influence of the media on the younger generations, here’s a good article I found: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/media-spotlight/201311/media-exposu...

Works Cited

Waurechen, Sarah. "Introducing Key Concepts." Marianopolis College, Montreal. 25 Nov. 2015. Lecture.

3 years 9 months ago

Hi, I find your post really progressive because like you said at the end, it is a message of hope and active change.

I am taking the course of Gendered World Views and found that all what you have said about race can be applied to gender. Here is why.
Children can develop racial but also gendered prejudices at a young age, influenced by their parents and environment. One of the first questions my teacher asked the class is: “Why are robots for boys and Barbies for girls?” The answer is simply that kids see other kids play with assigned gendered toys and are likely to imitate their peers.
You mentioned that black children are more likely to be suspended from school, but I would be more specific and say that black male children are more likely to be suspended from school. The reason has to do with intersectionality, which is an exponential function and not a simple addition (when race intersect with gender, it is not a good thing) and also gender. The example is thoroughly explained in the book Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (http://www.amazon.ca/Between-World-Me-Ta-Nehisi-Coates/dp/0812993543). In short, it says “Not being violent enough could cost me my body. Being too violent could cost me my body” because black boys usually grow up in a very violent environment, but they need to lower this violence every time they go to the outside world (school, church, malls, etc) (Coates). Therefore, is the black boy, his parents or the society responsible for his violence?

To conclude, education is indeed very important because it helps to make people understand and hopefully accept all of the behaviors influenced by very subtle environmental elements.
Have a nice day!

3 years 9 months ago

This post really caught my attention. The way that society treats black people is really a big issue. I completely agree with your ideas. There are many stereotypes regarding black people in society. These stereotypes greatly influences black people's life. For example, black people tend to quit school earlier, and they also tend to have a lower education. Black people, especially black men, are marginalized. When we think about black men, we often think of them as athletes, criminals or rappers. Unlike traditional masculinity, black masculinity is associated with violence. This marginalization would only have negative effects; it would make the issue worse. In order to fix the issue regarding black community, it would be great if we reconsider this issue from different angles.

Masculinity: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masculinity

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