Gendered World Views (section 11, Winter 2016)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be nice – we then assign an aesthetic to each group that reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will introduce students to the patriarchal world view that created the gendered stereotypes we live with today and the ways in which gendered assumptions structure society. We will then focus on the challenges that have been raised by the feminist world view and explore how women deal with gender inequality. The second half of the course will be largely dedicated to masculinity studies and feminist observations regarding how the patriarchal world view hurts men as well. Finally, we will end with a brief look at what the queer theory has to say about gender. Students will be asked to reflect on their own world views and how gendered ideas have effected their lives.

Marianopolis College
by student55 on March 20, 2016
In the article “Men and violence”, Dr. Ciaran Mulholland attempts to answer to why men are prone to violence, through a strictly biological lens. Mulholland notes the statistical proof that men commit violent acts more frequently than women and deems it an issue of sex and not gender. He focuses on the inevitable and seemingly natural factors that make men crave dominance. Mulholland mostly voices men’s hunter instincts as responsible for their violent disposition.

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by lrl on March 20, 2016
      In this blog post, the author chose to deal with masculinity and violence by analyzing the case of Adam Lanza, the man responsible for the death of 26 people during the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting that occurred on December 14, 2012, in Connecticut.        She argues that Adam Lanza was indeed a troubled child, but that the blame should be put on our culture which promotes violence, and that media should not talk about the issue of mass shootings in gender-neutral ways, for that the perpetrators are predominantly males.  

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Marianopolis College
by PancakeCustomer... on March 20, 2016
Tom Fordy’s article “What the Expendables tells us about the state of masculinity” argues that the “manliness” conveyed in movies like The Expendables and others of its kind, blatantly present its audience with what arguably a “real” man should be, ultimately showing all the traits that reside in the man box. Fordy uses satire in his argument that the Expendables is out of its prime and no longer represent today’s masculinity. Masculinity is no longer defined by men smashing and destroying everything around them (i.e.

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Marianopolis College
by CashMeOusside on March 20, 2016
Papi Edwards; a young 20-year-old was shot in a parking lot after disclosing her gender identity to a man she was meeting for the first time at the Fern Valley Hotel. Another story that was covered by CBS said that Zella Ziona was flirting with her 20-year-old boyfriend who then later shot her to death in an alley back in October and according to the reports it was because he was embarrassed that Ziona showed up while his friends were present.

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Marianopolis College
by Dog With A Blog on March 20, 2016
Men are not as shy towards violence as women, as 80% of violent crime perpetrators in Canada are male (Statistics Canada, 2008). This gender disproportionality does not exist only for violence against others, but also violence to one’s self. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has found that men are three and a half times more likely to commit suicide than women.

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Marianopolis College
by Dragon_xox on March 20, 2016
We've all heard it before, domestic violence is a very real and present issue in many cultures today, and celebrities are no exception. A recent BBC article interviewed Rihanna about the very exposed abusive relationship she endured with her now ex-boyfriend Chris Brown. Rihanna points out interesting things related to her specific case of domestic abuse and how she managed to thrive for a change by trying to reform her ex-boyfriend, even though the violence was still pursuing in her life.  

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Marianopolis College
by 1530307 on March 20, 2016
In this article, the author reveals five underestimated realities about sexual assaults in the military. These five realities can be summarized as men are victims of sexual assaults and the. quantity surpasses women, it is hard to get other people believe in victims’ story, the military system has a bad attitude toward women, victims are afraid to report rape since it can possibly ruin their career and rapists can easily control the mouth of the victims by threatening. 

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Marianopolis College
by SavageOpinions on March 20, 2016
In recent years, domestic and sexual abuse has become more evident in the NHL. The most notable stories to have surfaced are those about Semyon Varlamov and Slava Voynov. Both of these men were accused of abusing their partner, and Varlamov was ultimately let off the hook without a single repercussion.

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Marianopolis College
by Plume on March 20, 2016
Article: UC Santa Barbara Students Killed in Shooting Rampage (https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/05/27/uc-santa-barbara-students...)

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Marianopolis College
by Jaceee98 on March 19, 2016
Exposing the view of a professor, Errol Miller on the problematic of violence in schools per se as well as the impact it has on academic achievement, Andre Poyser’s article ''Violence Is Greatest Threat To Student's Educational Outcomes – Miller'' reports that this situation results from the hostile environment by which children are surrounded.

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Marianopolis College
by lizzysays on March 19, 2016
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2016-election/sheriff-investigating-if-trump-s-conduct-north-carolina-rally-qualifies-n538326

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Marianopolis College
by Broncos_1997 on March 18, 2016
This Baltimore Sun article written by Aaron Wilson is focused on Ray Rice’s infamous domestic abuse case of 2014. Rice was originally suspended for 2 games but once a video surfaced showing Rice knocking his fiancée unconscious and dragging her out of an elevator, the NFL suspended him indefinitely and his $35 million contract was terminated. The judge later dismissed Rice’s case and he was then finally reinstated back into the NFL. The article ends with quotes from Ray Rice from an interview he did with the Baltimore Sun back in February.

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Marianopolis College
by GWV25 on March 8, 2016
Hello everyone, I came across this video posted by Elite Daily, in light of International Women's Day. This kind of video may be familliar to many of you, it ressembles Jimmy Kimmel's "Celebrities Read Mean Tweets" segment on Jimmy Kimmel Live. However, you will notice nearly all of these comments made on these women's posts are gendered and ultimately have nothing to say about the content of the woman's post itself. 

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by Mermaid on February 20, 2016
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/controversial-american-apparel-ads...

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by Mermaid on February 20, 2016
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/controversial-american-apparel-ads...

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by Sparkles1401 on February 15, 2016
   This ad was made for the clothing brand called American Apparel. By looking at this image, we see a young lady lying on a bed wearing only a body suit. She has her legs open and it seems as if she is waiting for something. It looks like she is willing to give herself to the person she is staring at; the person that is seeing the magazine maybe? It seems as if this girl is in a vulnerable state and that she is being submissive to the person behind the camera.

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Marianopolis College
by SavageOpinions on February 15, 2016
      This Burger King ad is just one of many sexist ads that have been able to circulate at a This Burger King ad is just one of many sexist ads that have been created to draw the attention of consumers with the goal of having them remember the product. The ad is for Burger Kings’s BK Super Seven Incher sandwich and displays the sandwich in front a woman’s wide open mouth. The writing on the ad is, “It’ll blow your mind away”.

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Marianopolis College
by lost--galaxies on February 14, 2016
Over the past few decades, the media industry has grown and become more influential than it has ever been in the past. Society has developed a tendency to fall into the trap that is this overly capable industry and has therefore, encouraged a false perception of society as we know it.  In the advertisement presented above, produced by Warner’s Slimwear Lingerie, puts on display a pear that can be described as “curvy” or “rounder”.

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4 years 6 months ago

Hey Adam,

You raised some excellent points on the important issue of injuries in football. I agree that requiring coaches to undergo training in order to be able to properly teach the mechanics of tackling is critical in preventing the occurrence of life-changing injuries.
However, I think it is also important to realise the role masculinity plays on this problem.
One major issue is that football players are voluntarily playing through injury. For example, Brett Favre played with a broken thumb on his dominant hand in 2003, Byron Leftwich played through a broken tibia in 2003 and Chris Simms played with a ruptured spleen in 2006 (Total Pro Sports Editors). In all of these cases, I believe that these men battled through injury to conform to gendered expectations. According to hegemonic masculinity, men are supposed to be tough, strong, macho and dominating. By playing through injuries in a violent sport such as football, men are not only proving that their bodies are more dominant than women’s since they can withstand the rigors of football, but also their dominance over other men. Players who play through significant injury are seen as the toughest of men and are thus able to reinforce their masculinity and their place in the “man box.”

The other significant issue is that coaches and trainers are lying about their players’ health. Often times, players suffer severe injuries but are told that they can return to play by their coaches and trainers without being adequately evaluated and tested. For example, Jarrius Lindsey, a former running back for Jacksonville University, is suing the school on the grounds of negligence (13 News Now Editors). He received many concussions during his career, but was never properly treated for them, as the school did not follow the concussion protocol (13 News Now Editors). Consequently, “he will suffer from a traumatic brain injury, memory loss, excruciating pain throughout his body, headaches, depression and anxiety” (13 News Now Editors). Although some will say that the school did not follow the protocol because they wanted to win, I believe the real issue has to do with masculinity. Football is a sport that tests a man’s toughness and strength. By agreeing to play the sport, coaches and trainers expect their players to play through extreme pain. With all that said, this lawsuit is clearly a classic case of a team telling their player that he is “fine” and that he needs to power through the rigors associated with football.

Sources and Interesting Links:

http://www.totalprosports.com/2013/05/22/20-tough-athletes-who-played-th...

http://www.13newsnow.com/sports/college/former-football-player-sues-ju-o...

http://thinkprogress.org/sports/2016/04/08/3767765/nfl-players-retire-ea...

4 years 6 months ago

Firstly, I would like to thank you for talking about such a topic because it just puzzles me that there is a country out there that treats women the way they currently do in this day and age. As a practicing Muslim I do have some background knowledge on the basic fundamentals of Islam surrounding the gender inequality portion you speak of. I think it’s insane that women recently got the right to vote and also the fact that women are not allowed to drive in their own country, but this has nothing to do with the religion of Islam itself. It is the patriarchal monarchy that governs Saudi Arabia that implemented these kinds of laws that prevent women from experiencing the many pleasures associated with freedom that we are able to experience on a daily basis here in Canada. Furthermore the Quran preaches more about equality among men and women than what is actually interpreted by the government. There are strict rules about how men should behave and dress as well, and women are encouraged to be educated and are allowed to conduct businesses. This is what happens when the society has a patriarchal mindset.

The dress code is meant to keep their image “pure” in a sense that they don’t want women to be objectified; this is something that comes from the Quran because it’s important that women should not be judged by how they look but by their intellect. The purpose that male guardians serve is that they have to protect the women, yet here I am in Canada, independently walking to places I want to go to without any supervision and thankfully nothing terrible has happened to me. I could go on forever but, if they really were being true with themselves they would know that in the Quran, God declares, “…In God’s eyes, the most honored of you are the ones most mindful of Him: God is all knowing, all aware” (49:13). Thus stating that men and women are equal in front of God. Also another thing is that men and women must congregate every year in Mecca (which is in Saudi Arabia) to perform the pilgrimage and the women keep their faces visible; something mentioned in the article that I will provide at the end of this paragraph.

http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21694406-progress-w...

Works cited: where I got the line from the Quran
Pervez, Saulat. "Hijab In Islam." WhyIslam. N.p., 5 Feb. 2015. Web. 07 Apr. 2016.

4 years 6 months ago

Hi,
Although your article was a little short, I found it quite captivating; being a college student myself, the data you presented about the issue is very relatable, but also upsetting. Nowadays, the number of existing stressors that can affect people in their daily lives is unthinkable. Young adults, being in the prime of age, are faced with a wide majority of those sources of stress, and as a result can have severe anxiety and emotional problems. You may have named a fair amount of causes of the stress, but I feel I should bring into attention the fact that gender has also a lot to do with it. In today’s society, both boys and girls are immensely influenced by media and are taught the ideals of male and female beauty and standards from a very young age. They are taught that this is how “normal” people are supposed to be and that it is who they should also strive to become as they grow up. This type of mentality is especially problematic for young boys because growing up watching action movies about superheroes, it becomes imprinted in their minds that a man must be strong and handsome, a man must not show feelings, a man must be a brave hero and save the princess.. Etc. The requirements of the “Man Box” are quite demanding and it is nearly impossible to meet them all. Therefore, once in college, young men are pressured more than ever into becoming sexually active, doing things that are risky or that make them look tough. However, many of them might not agree with that kind of behavior and have other preferences. A good example is, as you stated, men who are part of the LGBTQ group who are unable to assert their masculinity like other men, and therefore get discriminated for it. It is an issue that is often overlooked by society because it is said to simply be of the nature of man, but I strongly disagree and believe that it is definitely a problem that should be looked into by all.

4 years 6 months ago

This post does a very good job of bringing Aboriginal issues to light, a topic which is often ignored by the media in Canada. You mentioned the abuse that Aboriginal women face and the improvements to their struggles thanks to the Violence Against Women Act. However, as you have mentioned, this is simply not enough to protect them from harm.

Aboriginal women are victims of multiple layers of oppression in a way that is described by intersectionality (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intersectionality). Not only do they face troubles due to their Aboriginal status, their sex compounds their hardships. The discrimination which they encounter is much greater than that of a white woman or an Aboriginal male since their identity includes multiple oppressed groups.

The consequences of intersectionality can be seen in the cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women, an example of which can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/nl-inuit-mmiw-1.3512896. This article examines the situation in Newfoundland and Labrador, where over one hundred Aboriginal women are missing or murdered, but police forces are doing little to solve a majority of cases. If members of any other group were being disproportionately victimized, there would surely be measures taken to remedy the situation.

4 years 6 months ago

I found your article very interesting and accurate in describing the issues with gender roles across the world. Since thousands of years, men are being portrayed as the dominant force and on the other hand, women are being shown as weak, vulnerable, and dependent on their male leaders. You are also absolutely right in saying that children nowadays are being taught how to act appropriately according to society. In many areas of the world, young boys are told to act "like a man" which means to not show much emotion and at the same time, to feel a sense of domination over others. If these men do not follow these expectations of society, they might be taunted about it from their male friends and they might not succeed the same way as someone who follows the description of how a "real man" should act. There are also young girls around the world who are being taught not to compete with men as they will never match their strengths, instead, they are told that women should be the ones taking care of the family and household chores. We are living in 2016 and yet there is still such a huge presence of hegemonic masculinity. Women are still being oppressed and being considered inferior to men and this is very well shown when it comes to the workplace. Although women are just as much if not more qualified than certain men, they are often not considered to be worth promoting in workplaces. The people who are in charge of promotion are often looking for qualities that fit with hegemonic masculinity which they do not find in their female workers and this is explained in the following article.
http://inequalitiesandhegemonicpower.blogspot.ca/2012/10/issues-paper-wo...

4 years 6 months ago

I found your article really interesting, but as you notice, pedophiles are often men. That can be explained by some social-construct explanations. According to Telegraph, “at least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children” (The Telegraph). The article also explains that pedophilia happens not near schools but in family, around us. That being said, men are more likely to desire having sex with children. Pedophiles are only a minority that shows it. Imagine the number of men concealing it! This can be explained by the fact that men want to express their dominance and power towards others. This is like a “norm” imposed by the society and the influence of media. Masculinity is shown through violence, power, wealth, health and sexual aggressiveness. However, men are not necessarily able to express their dominance towards people of their age. That’s why men will center their attention on children who are less conscious about danger and about self-protection. Men can abuse children because children are relatively weak and fragile. After the abuse, men get satisfaction and have an illusion of dominance even if children sex abuse is totally evil. That’s my personal opinion and thoughts about pedophilia. For sure, psychological illness also plays an important role in this issue.

Work cited:
Gilligan, Andrew. "'Paedophilia Is Natural And Normal For Males'." The Telegraph, 05 July 2014. Web. 08 April 2016.

4 years 6 months ago

I found your article really interesting, but as you notice, pedophiles are often men. That can be explained by some social-construct explanations. According to Telegraph, “at least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children” (The Telegraph). The article also explains that pedophilia happens not near schools but in family, around us. That being said, men are more likely to desire having sex with children. Pedophiles are only a minority that shows it. Imagine the number of men concealing it! This can be explained by the fact that men want to express their dominance and power towards others. This is like a “norm” imposed by the society and the influence of media. Masculinity is shown through violence, power, wealth, health and sexual aggressiveness. However, men are not necessarily able to express their dominance towards people of their age. That’s why men will center their attention on children who are less conscious about danger and about self-protection. Men can abuse children because children are relatively weak and fragile. After the abuse, men get satisfaction and have an illusion of dominance even if children sex abuse is totally evil. That’s my personal opinion and thoughts about pedophilia. For sure, psychological illness also plays an important role in this issue.

Work cited:
Gilligan, Andrew. "'Paedophilia Is Natural And Normal For Males'." The Telegraph, 05 July 2014. Web. 08 April 2016.

4 years 6 months ago

I found your article really interesting, but as you notice, pedophiles are often men. That can be explained by some social-construct explanations. According to Telegraph, “at least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children” (The Telegraph). The article also explains that pedophilia happens not near schools but in family, around us. That being said, men are more likely to desire having sex with children. Pedophiles are only a minority that shows it. Imagine the number of men concealing it! This can be explained by the fact that men want to express their dominance and power towards others. This is like a “norm” imposed by the society and the influence of media. Masculinity is shown through violence, power, wealth, health and sexual aggressiveness. However, men are not necessarily able to express their dominance towards people of their age. That’s why men will center their attention on children who are less conscious about danger and about self-protection. Men can abuse children because children are relatively weak and fragile. After the abuse, men get satisfaction and have an illusion of dominance even if children sex abuse is totally evil. That’s my personal opinion and thoughts about pedophilia. For sure, psychological illness also plays an important role in this issue.

Work cited:
Gilligan, Andrew. "'Paedophilia Is Natural And Normal For Males'." The Telegraph, 05 July 2014. Web. 08 April 2016.

4 years 6 months ago

First of all, you made a great summary of that article. I totally agree with you that it is a serious problem, and that Canadian government should do something to help these poor people.
As you mentioned in your article, many Aboriginal children have mental issues. However, having less access to social services is not the only reason for that. As a minority group in Canada, Aboriginal people are also victims of racism. They can easily be judged or bullied by other people at school or in the society. In addition, they have the same gender issues as the others. For example, hegemonic masculinity tells us that boys should be dominant, and girls should be subordinated and obedient. Therefore, Aboriginal women have an even lower social status than Aboriginal men. This fact has made them become one of the groups which have least privileges in the society, especially the girls among these kids that you mentioned. Due to intersectionality (a concept that says discrimination such as sexism and racism reinforce one another), these young girls suffer more than anyone at school. On the other hand, the situation is also difficult for Aboriginal boys. They are part of a minority group, but they have the privileges for being men at the same time.
In conclusion, different types of discrimination reinforce one another for these Aboriginal people. We all need to concern about this in order to prevent tragedies.
Here is the link to an article that discusses the relationship between social location and intersectionality which might be interesting for you to read: http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/courses/csafety/mod2/notes3.htm

4 years 6 months ago

Hi JVoisard, firstly, I appreciate your interest in the problem of alcohol abuse, a social issue worth addressing due to its impact on physical and mental well-being of the population. However, as your essay is of analytical nature, looking at this issue from diverse perspectives, such as a gender one may deepen your readers’ understanding. According to a U.N national development report, men are particularly hard hit by the overconsumption of alcohol. It is thus interesting to explore the link between men’s alcohol consumption and their beliefs about masculinity. In fact, as the man box, which is a series of rules for “acting like a man”, suggests that a real man should be emotionless. Men who seek to fit in the masculine model are discouraged express their feelings. Therefore, being drunk can be a mask under which they can temporarily relieve their emotional burdens. In other words, "drinking to get drunk" can be considered as a mean that allows men to protect their masculine identity. Furthermore, since parenting is still seen as a relatively feminine task in our society, men feel the need to have their own time, during which they are cut off from the care-taker role. Drinking, a culturally portrayed symbol of manliness, is certainly a way to spend their own time in order to reestablish their masculinity. Finally, as male dominance is celebrated by hegemonic masculinity, some men tend to show their dominance through drinking capacity, which according to them, also reflects their capacity in other domains.

There is an extended reading about the topic that may be interesting for you to take a look: https://he213.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/devisser202620smith-1.pdf

Works Cited
Jakobsson, Annika, Gunnel Hensing, and Fredrik Spak. "The Role Of Gendered Conceptions In Treatment Seeking For Alcohol Problems." Scandinavian Journal Of Caring Sciences 22.2 (2008): 196-202. Academic Search Premier. Web. 8 Apr. 2016.

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