Gendered World Views (Section 1)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be "nice" -- the aesthetic assigned to each group reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will investigate three different, and sometimes competing gendered worldviews: feminism, hegemonic masculinity, and the perspective of LGBTQIA activists. We will start by examining feminist discourses that help expose what it means to be a woman living in a man's world. Then we will investigate how North American society constructs masculinity and places another set of behavioural expectations on men, demonstrating that men also struggle with assumptions about gender. Finally, we will ask how the LGBTQIA community navigates the treacherous terrain of gendered expectations, and what this means for how they see the world.

Dawson College
by emph on November 5, 2014
Is it just me or has anyone else noticed that when you watch the news and hear about mass murdering or even a simple murder done by a man of color, society immediately needs to point out and emphasize the fact that the crime’s motives must be linked to his ethnicity, faith or culture. As if the crime and the man themselves are overshadowed by the fact that the perpetrator is not white, and then suddenly his actions speak for the entirety of his race or religion.

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by nat on November 4, 2014
As I was growing up till now I never knew there was a such thing called the “man box” I tough the rules of the MA box was a regular thing that a man should do. Then when this was presented to me, I saw that this is something that was tough for us from a young age. Like if something happened an that you cry he's going to tell you stuff like “man up” or “man don't cry” and much other stuff.

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Dawson College
by jabless on November 4, 2014
As shown in many magazines, Medias and television shows, women are more and more objectified, seen as nothing less than sexual tools or housewives. The objectification of women is amplifying. But what about men? Does anyone really think that men are not involved with social constructs? As a man, dealing with violence and masculinity became daily. Men always have to prove their superiority. Men always have to show how aggressive and strong they are in every place: home, work, locker room, etc. If they don’t, the society and people tend to see them as womanized men.

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Dawson College
by JustSomeGirl on November 4, 2014
Why is it that men are expected and taught from early ages not to show any emotion? If he is sad, suck it up, if he is in love, it's probably with his brain down south and not his actually heart and feelings because that's "so gay" and guys are not supposed to fall for a girl they're supposed to "smash her" and make his buddies proud, he has to pretty much be a brick wall. Yet, women, generally speaking, always say they like a man who shows emotion and shows what he truly feels and wants and will cry in front of us when something’s bothering him.

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by Tuna on November 4, 2014
      When gaming is mentionned, one of the first things that come into people's mind is "boys" or "guys". That should no longer be the case though, because a a study revealed that 52% of gamers are now women. The trope of video games being for guys is outdated, since the majority of the gamers now consists of girls. This new wave of female gamers came with the appearance of games on smart phones, as it made playing casual games much more accessible.  

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Dawson College
by barok on November 4, 2014
Boys, from the moment they were born, embark on a lifelong journey to be men. They are subjected under the strict unwritten code called the “Man Box”. They learn at an early age that it will be easier for them to navigate through this process if they conform to what the Man Box mandates. Boys are constantly reminded to “man up”, “not be a pussy” and be stoic, or else, they risk being shunned or be deemed as weak and worthless to be men. The Man Box is real. So as the pressures it comes with. Our current society turns a blind eye and even helps in policing this mentality and way of life.

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by Unknowntoyou on November 4, 2014
First, what is this man box? It's the rules that men have to obey to fit in society, and to not be criticized for being different. It ranges from how a man is supposed to act, his limitations, and his behavior towards others. This box shows men that they are not supposed to cross a certain line, or else they have to be prepared to suffer the consequences. These consequences go from personal insults, physical violence and even murder. This box is supposed to police men on how to become real ''men''.   

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Dawson College
by the wop on November 3, 2014
What Is The Man Box?                 The man box is a metaphorical box that categorizes what a man should be (inside the box), and what they shouldn’t (outside the box). This man box was created by our society, and is policed by guys and even girls. This man box is enforced to little boys at a young age and they are taught to follow it and if not be called “gay”, “pussy”, “fag”, etc..

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by Em_A7X on November 3, 2014
“33% of teenage boys will use unsafe methods for weight control”; “37% of men who binge eat will experience depression”; “up to 43% of men are dissatisfied with their bodies”; “10 million males in the United States will suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some point in their life.” – (National Eating Disorders Association, 2012, NEDA.org.)

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Dawson College
by Rusty on November 3, 2014
Hockey is commonly known as the most popular sport in Canada. Hockey has had controversial moments in the past pertaining to violence but the most predominant in this day and age is hockey fights. Hockey is one of, if not the only sport which is not centered around fighting that “allows” fighting during the game. Hockey rules do of course punish fighting, but not nearly as severely as other sports do. The punishment for fighting in most major hockey leagues is a mere five minutes in the penalty box, with no other repercussions to the perpetrators or their teams.

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by AD on November 3, 2014
Alexander D’Ambrosio But they are just words!  

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by Sundjay on November 3, 2014
When a child is born, depending on their sex, their father treats them differently. If it`s a girl, he will swear to protect her even when she`s all grown up and experience life on her own. Whereas boys don’t get the same special treatment, they are thrown into the world with barely any guidelines or help and have to fit their father`s ideals. They only get intervened when they bring shame to a man`s image, so for example if they show weakness such as emotions or pain, or if they play with dolls.

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by CrowMan514 on November 3, 2014
I think that the man box can be portrayed differently if there wasn’t the outs side of the box consequences. I don’t agree with all the different things that the inside of the man box contains but there are a few that should be taught to younger boys. In my opinion they should be courageous and should be able to be a leader, and in control. It’s just how we teach younger boys to become these male ideals. Violence is not a necessary way to show that one is strong or tough.

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by Victorious on November 3, 2014
There’s a problem.

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by Bunnyhugs on November 3, 2014
I frequent a few social media type websites, and it's kinda weird to see how people act towards certain things on each website. On Facebook, my friends more often than not react well to... 'objective' content.  http://www.reddit.com/r/TheRedPill/comments/2fq5n5/a_whole_bunch_of_bril...  

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by FabienLamour on November 3, 2014
     When thinking of "the man box" i can not help myself but to think of a man by the name of Michael Sam. He is an openly gay football player who almost cracked an NFL lineup and yes, he would have been the first ever openly gay man to play in the National Football League. This would have been a huge step for all gay's in any sport. Seeing as athletes are supposed to fit right into the Man Box by being strong, fast, athletic, emotionless and to get with as many girls as possible, it must not have been easy for Sam.

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2 years 1 month ago

What do you think about women who are totally okay doing this? Some women nowadays want to do work sex, consensual sex work. Should they be denied it? Or what of the women who feel empowered about this?

When you say more body types do you also mean 'obese' women, too? Tumblr (extremists, generally) definitely pushes the idea that obesity is 'okay', when it's really not. While I think in the media, generally the extreme 'skinny-ness' is pushed too hard, what if we push too hard the other way? Are we going to give people the idea that being overweight is okay?

Going further - is the problem just with the media? We're told not to let the media influence us, and it shouldn't. But young girls are falling victim to the influence anyway, should we maybe teach them to not fall victim to it, instead of just pointing the blame at the media?

2 years 1 month ago

To start on a good note this article had good descriptive passages. Also it brings very important issues and the choice of this horrible story is perfect to put the spotlight on them. However this article only points one of the issues, racism, but forget the other one, gender and in this particular situation both are incredibly linked together. In my opinion! I do not think the same thing would have happened if this teacher was a men dating a black women. Maybe it would but giving the world we live in I doubt it. Women are usually more of a target to oppression than men. Also they suffer from a lot of discrimination in their everyday life, in politics, in the economy, in their workplace and in many other things. What I try to point out is that this story is more about a gender problem and I say so only because the victim is the women and not her boyfriend. It is not her boyfriend that loses is job at the end! Yes she is bullied and discriminate because she as a black boyfriend but even more because she is a “she” that as a black boyfriend. Therefore the “white she” in the American ideal should date “a good white straight American man”. To conclude this professional women is a victim like many others of the view that her work is less valuable and that is why her employers and colleagues allowed themselves to act like they did. Finally this article was shocking and it was a wise choice to capture the attention of the readers and point out issues of inequalities. However it would have been great if you had included the gender problem of this situation.
Ps: if you are interested in more article of issues of women in the work place here is a great link!
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/news/women-in-the-workplace/

nat

2 years 11 months ago

First off all I'd like to say that your tittle was very captivating to me so that's what got me to read this. I'm surprise till this very day that people can even thing of doing something so discriminating just because the other person does not have the same color skin.I agree with you when you said that dressing up with blackface is extremely racist due to the fact of there pass. Even though Halloween as change from sinply costume to "sexy" outfits theses three white girls pushed it why over the edge not only that they knew what they where doing and had the courage to smile... This makes me wounder will this ever end? i think its crazy how they do stuff like this just because they think they are of a superior race even though the fact off the matter is that we are all human.

http://www.bustle.com/articles/43322-how-to-not-wear-a-racist-halloween-...

2 years 11 months ago

Hi there, I really enjoyed reading this post considering you've made some very interesting points and observations about issues I didn't quite think were issues…To me, Halloween all in all is just a complete mess. What I mean by this is that people are running out of ideas to try and come up with the most original and/or funny costume out there and too often they fetch way too far, creating this racist problematic. Moreover, I believed it’s also becoming a gendered issue in the way that girls are expected to undress and boys are expected to get ‘manly’ costumes like Batman and if that isn’t possible, it has to at least be funny or entertaining. Sadly, in many cases, this becomes offensive. Too many of these costumes are directed towards a certain group in a way that is rude and disrespectful. For example blonds, ‘nerds’, girls in general, people of color, sex object/organs…And as for girls, I find it saddening that the ‘norm’ today tells girls that your Halloween costume has to look sexy or cute and not just REAL. I am honestly all for sex positive messages but sometimes I want to tell girls that it’s okay if they want to dress up as Thor or Scream…they don’t have to be ‘Slutty Elsa’ if they don’t want or feel like it! Society has come to a point where they feel the need to alter (literally alter) women’s costumes to make them look sexier even if the said costume is just as innocent as a Teletubby. On top of that, we are starting to see this not only in women’s costumes but in girls (as in toddlers!) costumes too. I believe we need to rethink Halloween and the values we attribute to it. We need a fresh start, a day where people can actually dress up not dress down or dress to offend.

Here's a bunch of other examples of ridiculous women costumes: http://www.bustle.com/articles/41480-what-sexy-halloween-costumes-are-re...

2 years 11 months ago

Your title caught my attention and I was intrigued by what you have to say. You have mentioned in your post that studies are blaming the drop of testosterone levels among men today compared to their counterparts 30 years ago could lead them to be violent. This maybe true and might have been an important part of understanding the nature of violent behaviors among men but unfortunately your link does not work. Nonetheless, you raised an issue about the pressures men all over the world are burdened. Men are forced to fit in a certain group of traits and values called the “man box”. Being able to act tough, aggressive, and emotionless are some the traits that a man should possess if he wishes to be viewed as a real man, if he does not, he risks being shunned by other men and society at large, and probably be deemed as weak, worthless and unmanly individual. The pressure to play this role starts at an early age, leaving some men scarred for the rest of their lives. We should educate ourselves against this very destructive way of thinking. We should raise our boys differently and help them to avoid the traps of the man box. I believe steps are being taken to address this issue but I also believe that this issue will persist because our society is wired this way and majority of us do not know better.

Some helpful links (that I hope should work):

http://www.acalltomen.org/
http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men?language=en

2 years 12 months ago

One of the few titles that caught my eyes, was yours. I come from an Islamic household and I see how the hijab can create problems. I do not personally wear one, but I know some women that do, and they get those mean comments thrown at them. I understand that these slurs are offensive and they do not have their place, but she did sign up to an electoral campaign, she must have known that it was going to come sooner or later. In our class, we talk on how appearance means a lot, specially for women. You mentioned that they judged her because of her ethnicity,but people don't stop there. They must have judged her for being old, or being ugly or any other possible aspect of her exterior. Since the brink of time, people have judged others because of something they didn't like in their appearance. I know that you wish that it didn't exist, but it does. The vandalism wasn't necessary, but the people that did that, weren't to informed about Islamic people. You always hear people saying, and like you said in your post '' go back to your country '', ''all Islams are terrorist'', that's false. Media shows only the bad parts of Islamic people. Just like us, most of them that aren't involved in wars are very nice people. This goes bad to my point, it's not only Islamic people that get these mean slurs thrown at them. Imagine someone that wasn't heterosexual, and was homosexual, he would be getting as much hate or worse from these people. We can't really do anything about it, but try to educate others about it being wrong to hurt others without actually knowing what they're talking about. We can only hope that people can start opening their eyes, and let go of things that define someone because of their exterior. I would like for that day to happen, but as it is, I don't think we will be going anywhere, anytime soon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/05/us/maine-democrat-running-for-governor...

In this article, a man named Maine told everyone he was gay, and was wondering why would it matter that he was gay? I think people are simply distant about the thought that a gay man could run as president, or/and governor. Since people find that the heterosexual man/woman is normal.

2 years 12 months ago

This is a very good point you raise, its something that I didn’t think of until I read your article. I think about how I might teach my children about race one day; where would I start? It’s a subject that is kind of hard to discuss with a child, how long should we wait before we think they are old enough to have that talk? Just like the birds and the bees or with homosexuality. It’s hard to discuss a subject that in today’s society is not nearly as much of an issue so we tend to ignore them since they are not shoved in our faces. I think that it’s important to teach our children to love one another no matter what color you are or who you identify yourself as. In the case of identity, we should show to our children that being gay or straight shouldn’t make a difference in the way we perceive them. In my opinion what makes a person who they are is personality. We should teach children to understand that there is no difference between you and me physically, but how we act or behave is what we should be watching out for. If one is a gay man or a lesbian woman who are we to say that they are bad in any way. Many of the horrible dictators were either homophobic or racist. Yet people saw them as heroes or saviours, its ridiculous to think that just because one is not sexually attracted to the same thing you are or is born with a different skin tone makes then evil. People are very ignorant because no one taught them otherwise or were taught wrong. People are not born evil they are raise to be.

2 years 12 months ago

I believe that your analysis of this issue was spot on. I do agree that hockey is an emotional sport, and many of the fans are bound to get emotional as well, but racism has no place in hockey. Fantastic players have originated from all places and races of the world. There is no race in hockey that is superior that another and therefore race should not be used as a weapon to emotionally injure a player who has excelled.Subban once told a reporter that “As far as I’m concerned, I’m looked at as a hockey player. If people want to be ignorant and want to look at me as something else then they can. I’m a hockey player. I’ve played hockey all my life. It’s a sport that I love and I’m not worried about anything like that” (Article Below). This incident was an example of people made uneasy by being beaten and tried to reassert their dominance by putting Subban down using one of the only weapons they had left in their arsenal. This not only resulted in those involved to look foolish but also showed how some people react when their dominance is threatened. Subjects as delicate as race should not be used against players of any sport because their race does not help or hinder them in any way and therefore has no relevance in the world of sports.

Article: http://sports.nationalpost.com/2014/05/02/boston-bruins-take-right-step-...

Reply to: Not Black Enough?!
2 years 12 months ago

Thanks for sharing your comment, this issue is something I suspected that happened but I never heard of a punctual story about the phenomenon. As others have mentioned I think this happened as a reflection of the predominant Hegemonic masculinity doctrine. I would like to share the concept of the ”Man Box” to make a parallel between manhood discrimination and this episode. First of all, the self discrimination reaction of a person that should perform according to the expectations of a community is a factor that most men face in their lives no matter their ethnicity. The big difference is that is done about their manhood and not about their blackness. Let me talk to you about the Man Box; it is concept that explains the phenomenon of men asserting their manhood by saying that someone else is not men enough. By doing that they push someone outside the box, because they do not perform according to the expectations of the community and at the same time they affirm their masculinity. For someone to come back into the box they have to push somebody else out by repeating the behavior of their previous predator (pushing someone out because of not being men enough). So this issue of not being “black enough” sounds a lot like the man box. I don’t think it is a matter of color, but more of attitude and conforming to a “black” stereotype.
http://www.ted.com/talks/tony_porter_a_call_to_men?language=en
http://www.wgac.colostate.edu/men-and-masculinities

2 years 12 months ago

I very much agree with your post, colored children are treated differently in school. It’s not as common as it was about 10-20 years ago, but yes there are times where a teacher’s ways of punishing a colored child compared to a white one is different. I also wanted to point out that it’s not just African Americans who are mistreated in schools but also other ethnicities such as Asian, Hispanic and Indian. Anyone who isn’t born a Caucasian man or woman could end up being mistreated in the educational system, but also since I am in a Gendered World Views class, I have to add that not only are children born with different ethnicity mistreated but so are children who don’t under being hetero-sexual or as the gender they born into. There’s a website called “edtechpolicy” which explains and give ideas on how to make children who are LGBT (Lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender) feel safe at school. According to this website,” 30% [of kids with LGBT] have skipped a day in the last month [and] 25% drop out of school”. So clearly it’s not just a racial nowadays where only children of ethnicity are being mistreated enough to skip school or just dropped out, our educational which is supposed to be open-minded and non-judgmental has clearly become racist in more than just the color of our skin but also our sexual identity.

http://www.edtechpolicy.org/C32012/Presentations/catherine_Making%20Scho...

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