Gendered World Views (Fall 2016, Section 17)

About this class

Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, or at least that's what many of us were taught as children. But what are these stereotypes really telling us? Assumptions like these force men and women into specific roles, and from a very young age, we socialize boys to be aggressive and girls to be nice – we then assign an aesthetic to each group that reflects this. But how do real people deal with these expectations? What does it mean to see the world through gendered terms?

This course will introduce students to the patriarchal world view that created the gendered stereotypes we live with today and the ways in which gendered assumptions structure society. We will then focus on the challenges that have been raised by the feminist world view and explore how women deal with gender inequality. The second half of the course will be largely dedicated to masculinity studies and feminist observations regarding how the patriarchal world view hurts men as well. Finally, we will end with a brief look at what queer theory has to say about gender. Students will be asked to reflect on their own world views and how gendered ideas have effected their lives. A participation grade will be assigned.

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by Using on September 27, 2016
Ads are tools that companies use to commercialize their products. However, behind the purpose of selling products, advertising has serious “gendered issues”.  

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by aKd12DaN5 on September 26, 2016
           Although the negative feedback towards Suit Supply’s photos did force the company to remove them on Facebook, the company still decided to keep them on their website (“Suit Supply’s ‘Shameless’ Campaign Causes Stir With Scantily-Clad Women.”).            On the surface, this advertisement is simply trying to promote their new clothing line as 'chic', but as the public would agree, this advertisement is anything but innocent.

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by hotcoco on September 26, 2016
        “Sex sells” is a common phrase we have all heard. Companies use it as a tactic to grab consumers attention and Gaspari Nutrition is not any different. The company specializes in science based sport nutrition supplements. They guarantee that this product will get men stronger, leaner and bigger. The founder, Rich Gaspari is himself a very strong, lean and big man, he’s won multiple titles including “Mr. America”. Ironically, this company does not come near to demonstrating recent american values which includes the equality and proper treatment of women.

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by chunkwan2198 on September 26, 2016
As the societies evolves with time, sexist ads become more and more popular. One can say a lot about this following add. I am choosing to focus on what is wrong with it and why people should be concerned about it.

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by Tony Shoes on September 26, 2016
“Wait,I need you to put on this name tag before you get in my bed”... This advertisement for Post-it, yes, the school supply brand, is just another example of the many offensive ads we are bombarded by on a daily basis. The 2016, “For the little things you’ll forget” campaign (Post-It), by Post-It, depicts situations in which sticky notes are used to remind people of, well, the little things they forget. This ad from the campaign depicts a woman and a man in bed. The image is centered around the woman, who has a Post-It on her forehead with “Jade” written on it.

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by Je_Wm on September 26, 2016
In this Calvin Klein advertisement, Fetty Wap’s face can be seen with the slogan “I make money in #mycalvins.” (Calvin Klein Slammed For 'Sexist' NYC Billboard [VIDEO]) Similarly, Klara Kristin’s body can be seen in see through clothing with the slogan “I seduce in #mycalvins.” (Calvin Klein Slammed For 'Sexist' NYC Billboard [VIDEO]). The company is using his face and her body to sell their product which is undergarments for both men and women. The slogans used in this advertisement are a demonstration of women being “depicted as sexual objects or sexual agents” (Cortese 10).

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by abcd1234 on September 26, 2016
This advertisement was published in 2007 to introduce Tom Ford’s newest men’s fragrance. The photographer, Terry Richardson, wanted to convey the nerve and sexiness of the product by executing a more explicit photoshoot. The image includes a bottle of men’s Tom Ford cologne resting between a woman’s breasts. The woman is grabbing her breasts and she is lathered in, what seems to be, oil. Her fingernails are painted with bright red nail polish and her entire body is excluded from the photo, other than her chest.

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by ballet567 on September 26, 2016
The photo above is an advertisement for Duncan Quinn that came out in 2008 and ever since has been referred to as the “strangler” ad (Epstein). Duncan Quinn is well known for their unique men’s suits and ties, as well as their accessories. When I stumbled upon this ad, I was disgusted by it, as many were, and I have so much to say about it. The objectification of women’s bodies has unfortunately become such a normalized thing in our society as more and more high-fashion brands are doing it.

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by smileyface on September 26, 2016
Everyone is familiar with the sexualization and objectification of women in the media. While is not a new issue, many people are under the assumption that this problem is a thing of the past. Taking a deeper look at the advertisements and all forms of media we are exposed to today will prove otherwise; this issue is still pertinent and is as alive as always. Unfortunately, advertisements, particularly high-fashion ads, are into illustrating sexualized violence to sell their products. Often times women are found in a position of submission to men, and this becomes normalized.

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2 years 10 months ago

This is a great article, I like that you were able to interpret various issues that were represented in this ad. I particularly thought it was interesting that you said that the passengers seem calm to be in a dangerous environment because “One explanation could be that modern cars tend to give a more secure feeling than there is and that you don’t expect to die in a few seconds”, I have never noticed that before in speed prevention ads. I’m glad you brought up the issue of sexism in the ad both against women and men. There is a reason why the woman in the advertisement seems “passive”. In advertisements, women are often objectified, meaning degrading them to the status of an object. Because women are used as objects rather than people in the media, they can never express emotions as a person would. In the car advertisement, the woman’s lack of expression and passiveness shows that she is being represented as an object rather than a person. As you have pointed out, she seems relaxed rather than anxious when the driver is speeding. This is because women must always look “pretty” in any situation. Showing true emotions of distress or anger will make a woman look unattractive, which is unacceptable in the media world. This issue most often appears in movies, especially in male dominated movies.
Here's a short article about the objectification of women: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/05/study-the-objectificat...

Reply to: Rape and Release
2 years 10 months ago

First of all, I would like to mention that your title is very catchy and that your thoughts are explained in a very powerful tone. I would like to add to your arguments on how a person’s skin color could greatly affect the verdict of any crime. Brian Banks was a promising Black High School football player. Everyone expected him to play in the National Football League. When he was 19 years old, he was accused of having raped an unconscious girl and faced a lifetime in jail. Brock Turner committed the same crime as Brian Banks but got released after serving only three months. Why is Turner’s professional career more important than Banks? Well, Brock Turner conforms perfectly to the characteristics necessary to obtain privilege in society. He is most importantly a white man, straight, rich, athletic and he displayed his sexuality by committing this crime. He portrays the traits of the man-box established by our society itself. Hence, he is able to use his unearned assets to bend the laws in his favor. He faced 14 years of jail time but got released after three months. This injustice leads people to believe that rich white men could get away with anything because they are born with privilege. Nobody is born with the right to rape another individual and should not be tolerated because of their gender or their race. Both athletes committed an irreversible crime and they both deserve to be punished accordingly.

If you are interested to learn more about Brian Banks’ case, here is the link to an article with more details: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/wrongfully-convicted-brian-ba...

2 years 10 months ago

It is no surprise to American citizens that black people face a discrimination issue, where they must live with all of the injustices and stereotypes that are associated with their skin color. The notion that the "All Lives Matter" (ALM) movement disregards the "Black Lives Matter" (BLM) movement is simply false. Surely, the goal of the BLM movement is to raise awareness of the injustice that many black individuals face in their everyday lives. The ALM movement makes an effort at achieving human equality for all, no matter your race or gender. ALM recognizes the fact that all races and genders each face a certain inequality amongst a given society. In order to achieve equality for all, we must achieve gender equality as well as race equality. In discussing ALM and BLM, never really does the topic recognize the importance of gender and perhaps a “Women’s Lives Matter” idea. We must acknowledge the fact that black people are not the only ones who face injustice, women do as well. With discriminatory laws and norms that deny the chance for women to excel in society and for them to be seen as equals, there is a problem regarding gender. Therefore, to acknowledge those who suffer from injustice in society, ALM aims at achieving equal human rights for all. Those who fall under multiple characteristic traits that overlap and reinforce one another, whether it be of gender, race, sexual orientation, age, etc., are those who may face the most discrimination or inequality. This refers to the idea of intersectionality, in a given social situation, one individual may face more discrimination than another. ALM focuses on bringing people of all kinds together in an effort to reducing inequality for all, rather than just one particular type of people. The following article discusses the importance of combating discrimination in women:

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Discrimination/Pages/discrimination_women...

2 years 10 months ago

I appreciate the fact that you identify who is responsible for this situation. Companies like Hasbro and Mattel know what they are doing and they will continue to do so. The reason why this is happening is because our society has adopted the hegemonic masculinity ideology.
This essentially promotes and empowers the white straight male and creates what is described as the “Man Box”. It is characteristics or personality traits a boy or man should have when growing up. Intimidating and powerful being some of them, it only makes sense that action figures are muscular and designated for boys. Something nurturing like taking care of baby dolls doesn’t really fit the criteria, which is why they are designated as girl toys.
Although the toys may be gender labeled, we should not let the children be influenced and allow them to feel free to choose whatever they wish to play with. I hope that the major toy companies would understand this problem and take initiative.
There is a link that explains it pretty well the whole principle of it and it’ll be below if you want more information: http://tokiscool.blogspot.ca/2012/03/man-box.html

2 years 10 months ago

I really enjoyed reading your analysis of the issues that are involved with the wage gap, including intersectonality and the simple fact that although pay equity laws do exist, it still seems as though women are often not paid equally for jobs that involve the same level of skill and work. Also, even though in North America we like to view ourselves as very progressive, we are still far behind many other countries in many aspects of society.

One topic that you mentioned briefly was the mommy track, which was a topic that could have been elaborated on further to help your argument. The mommy track is the idea that women who want to have children will reach a point in their career where they will be forced to either choose their family, (which may result in pay cuts, loss of future benefits, or even the loss of their job completely), or choosing their job. This turning point in their careers is often a deciding factor when companies consider hiring a man or a woman for a certain position, and also when it comes to promoting men or women in certain situations. Furthermore, even if women do end up getting the job, or the promotion, they are heavily scrutinized for requesting maternity leave and taking time off to take care of their children. This is because to move up the corporate ladder, one is supposed to behave like a man, which would involve putting your work ahead of everything else in your life.

Here’s an interesting article about how women themselves have been socialized into believing that they must choose a family or a successful career, and ways in which we can remove this idea from our society. http://qz.com/449750/hey-millennial-women-lets-get-past-the-idea-that-ca...

2 years 10 months ago

Let me begin by complementing you on the focus and development of your article. Addressing the topic in a clear-cut manner and unraveling the thesis through statistics and evidence along with brief explanations of given proofs presents your essay in a coherent, academic perspective. I personally think, however, that adding a gender lens to the issue of racism and police brutality might take your analysis a step further. It is important to know that the context of black criminality in the US is that of policing masculinity, meaning that society often applies social pressure to its male members to conform to its expectations of hegemonic masculinity. As soon as a male member steps out of the “man-box” defined by hegemonic masculinity, policing masculinity relies on misogynist and homophobic slurs to demand conformity. This social pressure is applied by both men and women, but is at its worst in all-male friend groups. As the ideal man promoted by hegemonic masculinity is a white man (given that they are the most privileged), the “man-box” suggests that other men assert their masculinity through other masculinity tropes, seeing as the avenue of success is farther from them. This is why the idea of black masculinity is hyper sexualized and violent and this image of black masculinity and uncontrolled violence plays in the back of the minds of the police. For more on masculinity policing, or gender policing in general, this Wikipedia page offers a helpful and comprehensive outlook.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_policing

2 years 10 months ago

Your words speak the truth, although how unfortunate it may be for women. Your post about women’s employment issues states that there is clearly a major discrimination going on and how they find a way to avoid employing women due to their social construct. Both men and women have equal rights, and equal rights means equal pay. Their pregnancy shouldn’t affect their pay rights. The government may be taking measure on this issue, but launching the equal pay law in the 20th century didn’t seem to have any effects what so ever, so what more can they do? Especially when we may still consider ourselves a patriarchal world, and a women’s only job is to be a caregiver. Your post also unconsciously seems to be referring to the Mommy Track. This refers the diminishing opportunities all women face after giving birth to a child. Further research on this can enhance your research and your knowledge on the discrimination of women (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mommy_track).To summarize, the discrimination of women is truly a saddening topic to talk about, especially when women can also contribute tremendously.

2 years 10 months ago

The title of your text was direct and to the point, which is what caught my attention. Throughout the entire text, you made very direct points with clear explanations, and did not beat around the bush about anything. I think that the topic you chose to write about is one that is very important and must be more openly recognized. The statistics you used to quantify sexual harassment frequencies upon female restaurant workers by their managers provides a better understanding of how serious this problem is. This article relates to the concept of rape culture, specifically how rape and sexual harassment become normalized through these ideas. Although you only refer to sexual harassment in this text, rape culture still applies to the concept. The fact that the managers of restaurants encourage provocative clothing in order to benefit the business by getting extra tips and attaining a certain reputation portrays the ignorance society has towards rape culture and how it is omnipresent. It also alludes to the idea that pleasing males is prioritized over a female's opinion. The amount of sexual harassment reports is numerous enough to deserve presence in the media, which is lacking. I have witnessed sexual harassment at work first hand. I work in a simple Italian bakery, serving customers with whichever goods they desire. I, along with other girls I work with, have been cat-called and commented on based on our gender. The subject you presented in this article is extremely important and must be heard — along with the significant downplay of sexual harassment accusations and reports. Here's more information on rape culture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_culture

2 years 10 months ago

I found your post to be very interesting and very important because it is a discussion that our society needs to keep talking about, and if we do not, then these issues will never get resolved. I liked the statistics you provided in your post like the one about how every 28 hours, a black person is murdered by police. Like you said, they are shocking and scary. But if we do not bring them up, then it renders the issues obsolete.
Through a gendered lens, there is a reason as to why there is so much police brutality and racial profiling. This might be able to further analyze the situation. Hegemonic masculinity is the promotion of male dominance. The man-box is an example as to what qualities men need to be to conform to the hegemonic masculinity, and they need to conform to as much of it as possible, if not more. Here is a link to an image to the man box: http://www.wgac.colostate.edu/Data/Sites/2/systemfiles/men-and-masculini.... In the image, it shows a list of qualities they need to be and if they do not conform to them, Outside the box shows insults used to push them in to the man box. Even though black men, according to Hegemonic Masculinity, are considered more athletic and strong than white men, it comes at a price. Because they are much stronger than white men, they can also appear as more violent and aggressive because they are not in control, another quality to conform to in the man-box. This is a horrible system, but unfortunately it still applies to police brutality and racial profiling. If black men are not violent enough, they risk getting themselves killed by the police. If they are too violent, then they risk getting killed in fights with other people, often in group fights with people of their own race and in their neighborhood.

2 years 10 months ago

Greetings,
Supported by convincing facts, your article points out a very interesting trend that occurs in our educational system today. The way you discuss specifically on primary and secondary teachers brings out the attention of the stereotype that our society still holds: nurturing is a woman’s ideal role. It seems that even though we recognize women’s agency and ability, we still assign them the nurturing character that is supposed to be shared by both sexes. The outcome of this tendency is, as you mentioned, problematic as it also leads to the depreciation of teachers’ respect and salary.
You mentioned that one of reason of male teacher’s disappearance is the fear of their misbehavior from the parents. The bigger problem behind this concern is that we still live in a hegemonic masculinity that views women as moral puritans due to their emotionality and nurturing character as if we are back to 19th century. It is also ironic that when it comes to higher education, males seem to occupy a senior role more often than females. For example, less than one quarter of the Canadian university leaders are females. This reinforces further your point that men are still bound to the social role as bread-winner.

Here’s a link that discusses about the female academics in Canada:
http://www.universityaffairs.ca/opinion/margin-notes/progress-is-slow-fo...

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