Flacks: Ethics Winter 2015

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by John Snow on September 9, 2015
In the article, ‘’I’ve had enough of celebrities making empty apologies for their racism’’ (The Guardian, September 8th 2015) by Rebecca Carroll, the author shares her opinion about the incidents that have been going on in numerous social medias over the year 2015. She mainly argues that many celebrities, who are read and followed by thousands of people, seem to rely too often on vague and simple apologies to compensate for some of their statements that could be considered as offenses on other people’s ‘race’ or culture.

448 | 0 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on May 11, 2015
                         

1,057 | 1 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on April 20, 2015
                           Mali the former French colony once called French Sudan has become one of the many new areas in which U.N troops are currently operating in. since 2012 conflict in Mali became part of the expanding global war on terror, with Mali’s Northern territories coming under the control of radical Islamist groups such as spinoffs of Al-Qaida and Tuareg rebels. These groups took advantage of the governments inability to secure the borders of Mali after a Coup by the military that successfully overthrew Mali’s democratically elected president Amadou Toumani.

933 | 2 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on March 31, 2015
     The U.N has always been seen as a method to which Canadians can get involved in international issues. In 1995 there were over 5000 Canadian service men and women carrying out U.N missions over seas, now there are less than 200. The reasons for Canada’s neglect on the role of Peacekeeping are in part due to the failures of previous operations which harmed Canadian faith in the ideals of peacekeeping. One such operation was the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, in which the majority Hutus 81% of the population began slaughtering the minority Tutsi (14%).

1,328 | 1 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on March 16, 2015
      Imagine a life where you cant eat three meals a day, you don’t have a warm bed to snuggle up in a night, and that every day you struggle to find a new place to sleep. This is the life of a homeless person, a life where there are no excesses and hope for a better future is non-existent. According to the Wesley institutes study on homelessness produced back in 2013 over 20,000 Canadians experience homelessness on any given night, and a reported 200,000 a year.

1,597 | 3 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on March 10, 2015
               Montreal is a city known for its festivals and grand displays of culture from all around the world. A city in which 3.5 million people call home, however there are some things which can often be overlooked. Quebec has the second highest percentage of Homeless people in Canada behind Ontario. Quebec being at 17.5% and Ontario being 46.9% of the estimated 300,000 homeless people in the country. Many of these people live within a line so entrenched in poverty it’s almost impossible for them to get out without external aid.

1,981 | 5 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by P-M Gauthier on February 25, 2015
Freedom?  

1,467 | 3 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by The Nommz on February 23, 2015
             Our country has long had a reputation for being culturally tolerant and fair, for decades people from all over the world have flocked to our nation because of this simple fact. Canada as a result has become a hub of multiculturalism, however how far are we willing to let certain individuals go with freedom of expression? Imam Hamza Chaoui a spoke person for the Ashebeb community centre in Hoshalega and Maissoneuve , and supporter for certain elements of Sharia law has spurred this debate.

1,273 | 3 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by K.A.K on February 18, 2015
The issue of terrorism has never been more of importance than now, with the recent attacks on the French journal Charlie Hebdo. On January 7th 2015, two Jihadist brothers, Cherif and Said Kouachi killed 12 journalists of Charlie Hebdo, an editorial known for its opinion on Islam and terrorism (BBC News). The days following the attack, a hostage taking situation happened in a supermarket. Amedy Coulibaly and his wife Hayat Boumeddiene were the principal actors of the siege (BBC News).

5,141 | 7 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by John Snow on February 16, 2015
In a world where medical advancements enable us to save more and more lives, a lot of people are still reluctant to offer their organs after their death to people who really need them to live. Applying a signature to the back of a health insurance card signifies that you allow doctors to harvest organs from your body in order to give them to a person in need, and I think it would be unethical to do otherwise.

1,569 | 3 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by fluffy on February 16, 2015
Nowadays, since there is some places in the world that have not the best conditions to live, there is a lot of emigration from those countries. Where do migrant go? They try to look for a better environment where there is opportunities and respect for the workers. Most of the time, these people chose to install themselves in an industrialized country as U.S.A., Canada, United Kingdom, etc. Unfortunately for the migrant workers, the language used in that country is often a different one from their own.

950 | 2 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by kanyewestsego on February 16, 2015
1.       In the article “Abortion Debate to Heat up Again in Iowa Statehouse” by Mike Wiser we see an argument between the Republicans and Democrats of Iowa State. The republicans are against abortion while the Democrats are pro-abortion. Abortion is legal in Iowa and recently there has been an increase in induced abortion and a decrease in surgical abortions. The article shows that they are split about 50% 50% throughout the state on what pregnant women chose to do.

911 | 1 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by kayla.poirier25 on February 16, 2015
In the article " Ebola drugs raise ethical dilemmas " CBS news, Denis Thompson addresses the issue of the deadly disease, Ebola, and it's treatment. This viral disease is said to have 90% fatality rate. However, a drug called ZMapp has been tested on monkey's who carried the disease and was been proven affective. Although, there is a dilemma in letting this untested drug availible for sick humans. There is a multiple of questions to be asked.

1,472 | 3 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by taylormcclure on February 16, 2015
The article “Government of Canada Takes Action to Protect Youth from the Dangers of Tobacco Use” written in Targeted News Service, discusses the restrictions that the Minister of Health is putting on flavoured tobacco products used by youth. Canada was the first country in the world to action on “flavoured additives” that contributed to the making of cigarettes by banning them in 2010 (Government 3). Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in Canada. It kills around 37,000 people per year.

1,338 | 2 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by laurie.c on February 16, 2015
According to the World Health Organization, medical tourism is the act of travelling “across international borders to receive some form of medical treatment.”(Kelley) Medical tourism has become increasingly popular for Canadians, since patients often have to wait really long before getting their treatment done in the Canadian health care system. This industry is consistently growing, even with the cautioning and warning of some health experts. Canadians are going out of the country mainly to get treated faster, to save money, or to be treated with procedures that do not exist in Canada. The article “Should medical tourism be used to supplement gaps in our health care system?” by the Montreal Gazette, indicates “that almost 50,000 Canadians travelled for medical interventions in 2013.”(Seidman) Is medical tourism a good way to get around our slow and in some ways problematic health care system? One may argue that medical tourism can be dangerous, but overall, it is more positive than negative. People who are sick would do anything to try to get a cure. Living in pain and suffering is something no one wants to live. It is inhuman and unethical to let people suffer when they could get relief. Medical tourism is good because people can get faster treatment, so suffer less. Also, Canadians can save a lot of money by getting treatments overseas, because even with insurance, some treatments can cost a lot of money. Getting treatment oversees is way better than getting the same treatment here and then being in debt since the cost was way too huge for your budget. Also, as the academic journal article “Medical Tourism: A Look at How Medical Outsourcing Can reshape Health Care” states, international hospitals are more welcoming and the quality of care is better than in North American hospitals. The hospitals are cleaner and patients are treated better and can get treated faster. (Bennie) Some may argue that this way of getting medically treated is dangerous, and they are right in some part. Patients have to be careful when looking for clinics in other countries of the world. Some clinics may not be good. However, patients can quite easily look on the Internet if the hospital is certified and have many information about whether it is a hospital trustworthy or not. Patients have to make use of their self-judgment, and if they do so, they won’t be implied in any sort of danger. They could also use the internet to contact a patient who has had previous experience with that hospital to have more information. Work cited Seidman, Karen. “Should medical tourism be used to supplement gaps in our health care system?” Montreal Gazette. Montreal Gazette, 14 February 201. Web. 15 Feb. 2015. Bennie, Rebecca. “Medical Tourism: A look at How Medical Outsourcing Can Reshape Health Care.” Texas International Law Journal. 49. 3(2014):583-600. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 feb.2015. Edward Kelley. Medical tourism: WHO Patient Safety Program.Np: World Health Organization. www.who.int.Web. 15 feb.2015.

1,484 | 1 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by John_Doe on February 16, 2015
For more than a year now, the ISIS military group has shocked the world with inhumane public assassination and torture. Their terrorist acts are getting more and more attention and are much frequent nowadays. No countries had overtly declared that they were going at war against that group. Two weeks ago, a video release by ISIS members was released, and changed everything.

1,324 | 2 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by AlexR on February 16, 2015
The case of the young native Makayla Sault, the girl who refused cancer treatment, raised a lot of debate during the last month. After her first month of chemotherapy, she (and her parents) decided to get on holistic medicine and leave chemo. Unfortunately, Makayla passed away. Her parents claim that her death was caused by the treatment, when specialists blame the cancer itself. Everyone should have the right to decide how to cure (or not) themself, that is why I think not leaving someone make its own choice is unethical.

3,256 | 4 | 0
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by c.papadopoulos on February 16, 2015
In the article “Abortion access varies widely across Canada” by Leslie Young, posted on Global News on November 26th, 2014, it discusses how the amount of abortion services across Canada range per province. Young starts by explaining that Brian Gallant, the premier of the province of New Brunswick, announced to the public that he wishes to give the women of his province seeking abortion greater access. According to Dr.

2,331 | 4 | 0
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Tee
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
Student

|
3 years 5 months ago

This topic is really interesting and it will be a challenging topic to wright about. Even if it's a hard concept i am sure you will learn a lot about our world and how many different ways the human race has changed it. your work is great but id like to see more examples of how nuclear weapons have affected the world.

3 years 5 months ago

This topic is very well explained and i'm happy that you took this topic because in our days it is extremely difficult to get a job. I cant wait to see what you will say about this problem!

3 years 7 months ago

I chose your comment because I am genuinely involved in sports news, and because I witnessed myself other occasions where racism occurred in sports. I totally agree with you especially on the part where you mention that these racist comments where made by white, rich males that where put in a position to look down at minority groups. In one occasion I went to see the Hamilton Bulldogs against the Lehig Valley Phantoms, which are both clubs in the AHL (American Hockey League), and the game went to a shoutout. When it was time for Wayne Simons, an African Amercian player, to go alone against the goaltener, someone in the stands threw a banana at him. I assume the person was referring to him as a monkey. I was in shock, and since then, I hate the fact that some fans of my favourite sport still have obsolete thinking such as this. An interesting way to go on with the topic would be to take a look at what is said between players of opposing teams during games with the help of mics. I assume there are pretty mean things said out on the ice or on the field that could be sanctioned.

Tee

Reply to: The Ideal Asian
3 years 7 months ago

I’m choosing to comment on this post because it’s a very interesting one. Many people do think that Asians are the most intelligent race, and it’s one of the most prominent features of their stereotype. It’s interesting to see an article written on this issue, and it’s even more interesting to see your interpretation towards it, and even to know your personal stories related to this issue.
I agree with you and the author Bernadette Lim in her article "Model Minority" Seems like a Compliment, but It Does Great Harm.” A stereotype, no matter how flattering it may seem, doesn’t do good for anyone’s self-esteem. By teaching someone who’s Asian of this stereotype, the one to be smart, it teaches them that they have to be smart. When someone who’s Asian gets a bad grade, they then feel as if they’re not as good as they can be. Linnaeus described Asians as “yellow, melancholy, and greedy.” True, there’s no word about them being smart, but any kind of stereotype, whether it be that they’re always intelligent or that they’re greedy, is a destructive thought.
In conclusion, I agree that stereotypes, whether they be positive or negative, should be destroyed. It doesn’t help or benefit anyone in anyway. The biggest question here is how heavily these stereotypes have influenced certain people’s career choices. If Asians weren’t expected to succeed as greatly as they’re currently expected to, would there be a decline in Asian doctors, and other high paying professions?

Tee

Reply to: What is a man?
3 years 8 months ago

I chose to comment on this post because its a well written post that deals with the issues of gender and their stereotypes. It's interesting to see just how quickly masculinity and violence are grouped together, as if they're synonyms. As you brought up in your post, the media is a heavy influence of this, and that itself is an interesting topic.

If we were to relate this issue to the one of race, we could say that certain races are more affected by these stereotypes than others. Typically we see African Americans as the "violent" race. When a black man commits a crime, it's seen as something in his "nature" to do. When a white man commits a crime, he's considered to be "unstable". There are ridiculous stereotypes like this for each race, so it could be that someone who's black feels more of a need to be dominant because that's how society sees him to be. There is a reading called "A Family Guide to Talking About Race", in which there's an activity about understanding discrimination. If kids were taught this from the beginning of time, we would grow to be a society that doesn't place more pressure on one race to try and appeal more to their stereotypes.

In conclusion, it's true that the media places pressure on men, more than others depending on their race. Do you think that there is a certain "race" that is excluded more than others from this pressure men face to be dominant? If so, do you think that the people within this certain race feel like less of a man?

Tee

3 years 9 months ago

I’d like to begin by saying that I’m commenting to discuss the issue of racism, and more specifically, the question of racism that your article is centered on. Your article, whichis very well written, is centered on the topic of asking someone “where are you from?” which is a question that can raise a lot of controversy in today’s society. For this reason I’ve chosen to comment on your post to further discuss this article.

Its true that asking someone where they’re from is a touchy subject, especially depending on the person. I agree with you about the fact that we shouldn’t just ask people straight out “where are you from?” This comes across as rude to many people. I strongly agree with the fact that we should notice and be comfortable with noticing physical differences between us and someone else, and that we shouldn’t just pretend we don’t see a difference. Again, I agree with the fact that we shouldn’t put so much importance on race, but we should in fact acknowledge that people who belong to certain races have different psychical characteristics for the most part. I feel that if everyone had this viewpoint towards “race”, then it wouldn’t be viewed as such a big deal in today’s society and it wouldn’t be used as a defining feature for people.

In conclusion, I agree with your points regarding the article from Huffington Post. I can’t help but wonder that if “races” could ever really be fully socially accepted, and if they were, would that mean there would be no more racism?

3 years 10 months ago

This article interests me a lot because when I first learned that Donald Trump was campaigning for presidency, I could hardly believe what I had heard. I was aware of the multiple controversies he had caused but not in thorough details, which is why I chose your article. I totally agree with you and the author in the sense that different ‘races’ or cultures should not ever be used as arguments of discrimination, especially when specific groups are pointed out like in this case. In my opinion, the dumbest part of Mr. Trump’s argument is that even if he would end up as leader of the Republicans, he would never be able to put his party in power in the United States because the groups he pointed out, which consist in an important part of the country’s population, would never vote in his favour. The fact that he points out Latinos and Mexicans clearly proves that he acknowledges them as being different than the rest of the country, and that they should be treated differently. His arguments go in the opposite direction of Jared Diamond’s ideas on race being an arbitrary system that cannot be proven scientifically in any mean. To conclude, even if the article you chose seems to be relevant and worth looking at, I would like to know if the author himself has Latino or Mexican origins because it could add a bit of bias to his work. However, you did a great job and summarizing the article and you clearly gave your opinion with proofs and explanations.

Tee

3 years 10 months ago

First off I'd like to tell you that I'm commenting to further discuss the issue which you surrounded your article on. I've chose your post because I think its appalling how a family, who was on vacation and trying to relax, could be forced into such a terrible situation like this. Your post really sums the article up and gives all the right details so that someone reading your post doesn't have to even go read the full article on Huffington Post.

I'm pretty sure it's no secret that racism is alive and well in too many places already, but to have it broadcasted in such a public and aggressive manner is astounding. I strongly agree with how you said that Kanisha and her family didn't deserve to be treated in that way. It's unacceptable for racism to be so prominent in this day and age. I think no one, no matter what "race" should be treated as if they're inferior to anyone else. Although, it seems as though many people still believe that humans come divided into distinct groups based on their skin colour, and that some skin colours are more superior than others. This, is of course called racism, which was already pointed out within your post.

In conclusion, racism is largely based on the thought that "races" matter, so what do you suppose would happen if we had never even come up with the idea of race? Would there be something else for people to aggressively attack others on, or would the world be a little more at peace?

Reply to: Art to contribute
4 years 2 months ago

It is a good thing that your passion is linked to your volunteer opportunity. The fact that your love of art and love of animals such as lion are linked will really help and drive you towards your dream and goals. In order to reach more people and awareness about your cause, of course you can use social media to share your artwork and promote your cause or you could get involved in a legal street painting group in order to see your artwork exposed to the eye of everyone. This could have a great impact on your cause and bring more positive results than social media itself.

Reply to: Art to contribute
4 years 2 months ago

It is a good thing that your passion is linked to your volunteer opportunity. The fact that your love of art and love of animals such as lion are linked will really help and drive you towards your dream and goals. In order to reach more people and awareness about your cause, of course you can use social media to share your artwork and promote your cause or you could get involved in a legal street painting group in order to see your artwork exposed to the eye of everyone. This could have a great impact on your cause and bring more positive results than social media itself.

There no collaborative classes

About the author

I'm a Humanities Teacher at Champlain College, Saint-Lambert and the designer and founder of Newsactivist. Between 2007 and the present, I've developed a course, Newsactivist, which asked students to blog about the news that they felt showed parts of the world in need of improvement.