Dr. Kaldor's Intro to Soc

About this class

In this class, students are developing their sociological imagination and exploring how social scientists develop and seek evidence to support explanations for important social phenomenon. As bloggers, students well review journalism and social science research on issues they care about. By exploring issues across borders, we will look for the differences in meaning, the similarities in social forces, and the connections that tie diverse groups to one another.

Image Source: Wong, E. (2016, August 29). “Facekini”-Wearing Chinese Stand Up for the Right to Bare Nothing. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/30/world/asia/china-france-burkini-faceki...

 

URI (University of Rhode Island)
by bndayishimiye on November 8, 2016
Do Social Services Matter for Child Maltreatment Prevention?: Interactions between Social Support and Parent's Knowledge of Available Local Social Services In this article (Tori Negash and Kathryn Maguire-Jack 2015) looks at how general policies to give services to the community decreases the incidence of child abuse and neglect. In the article authors gives a way to think about decreasing child abuse and neglect that many people might not think about. Authors believes that adding efforts to increase connections between parents may be effective.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by cec7795 on November 7, 2016
this article took a look at the problems that come along with the use of Native American based names and mascots on sports teams across the country

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by jenna_miller on November 7, 2016
Many of the LGBTQ youth community face discrimination from their peers every day. Certain activities and that the community engages in can increase their empowerment and have a positive impact on their well-being.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by kayla_bourbon on November 7, 2016
Kayla Bourbon   Kaldor Soc 100   11/7/16   Budget Cuts and Difficult Working Conditions for Student Necessities  

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by Kaela Schumann on November 7, 2016
The article I found is titled “Binge drinking in and out of college: An examination of social control and differential association on binge drinking behaviors between college students and their non-college peers.” This article is about excessive drinking behavior in both college and non-college groups. It’s looking at whether one is more likely to drink in college or out of college at the same age. However, The most prominent predictor of individual drinking is peer behavior.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by pw0311 on November 7, 2016
            The wage gap between men and women in the workplace is an issue that has been around for decades. The issues originate from women occupations being undervalued thus getting paid less than men with “better” jobs. Currently, women have equal positions and are still being paid less than men for doing the exact same job. This is for many unjustifiable reasons. One being that women are allocated to positions within a company that are generally lower paying.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by jam20 on November 7, 2016
Education for those with disabilities is crucial to their individual success. Does the United States education system accommodate the needs of these individuals appropriately?

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by vjkajoyce on November 7, 2016
Is the government contributing to an epidemic that they are trying to cure? The U.S. government bankrolls a program called SNAP. The SNAP (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program) aka Food Stamps is a  federally  funded program that gives monies to poor people to buy food. The goal of this program is to combat hunger in low income people. This is an admirable goal but what about its side effects?

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by justsomebody on November 7, 2016
Aging is a very important social topic because everyone, if fortunate, will live long and grow older within their own society. How this is then perceived and the lives of older people is highlighted in this article which talks about aspects, both in today’s time and the future, of people of old age in the Western world. More specifically, the nation of Poland is studied using socio-cultural and historical data as well as quantitative data by means of statistics and polling. The aging process includes biological, psychological, and social aspects (Mucha, Kryzyzowski, 2010, p. 247).

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by ryan_pacheco on November 7, 2016
Everybody knows that racism is still a very important and prominent issue in our society. Everyday, people of color or other ethnicities not white are mistreated by law enforcement for no apparent reason. Other than the color of their skin, the law enforcement mainly rely on the situational and community factors when contemplating if nonlethal force is needed or not to apprehend a suspect. This is a very important topic because all citizens should be treated equally by law enforcement no matter what race or community they may come from.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by Mass02026 on November 7, 2016
In recent years the concern about childhood vaccinations has become a focus. For the most part in first world countries vaccinate-preventable diseased have greatly been reduced through routine vaccinated programs (Harmsen 2013). Despite the prevention these vaccines have had for people there are still parents who are apprehensive when it comes to giving their children these same vaccinations, there is even a small portion of parents who simply refuse. If these vaccines have been proven to help saves the lives of children, why wouldn’t parents want to give their children the upper hand?

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by MarineActivist on November 7, 2016
Parents across the United States have been refraining their children from getting vaccinations. In September of 2016, a study came out that probed parents on why they are or are not vaccinating their children, are they solely thinking about their child’s health, or the health of the nation? The greater the number of parents that do not vaccinate their children increases the risk for everyone against controllable and avoidable diseases.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by BLMayotte on November 7, 2016
Undocumented minors are people too and the rights of these people is what the DREAM act fights for. The article in question does not necessarily focus on the goal of the movement but rather the identity of those involved. By establishing that advocates of the act are recognizable, complex individuals, the article shows a different and important aspect of the movement.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by BLMayotte on November 7, 2016
Undocumented minors are people too and the rights of these people is what the DREAM act fights for. The article in question does not necessarily focus on the goal of the movement but rather the identity of those involved. By establishing that advocates of the act are recognizable, complex individuals, the article shows a different and important aspect of the movement.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by Julia on November 7, 2016
What is healthy? We know what it isn’t. Unhealthy is eating french fries three times a day, only eating fruit in the form of Jell-O, or drinking soda instead of water. Despite labing these behaviors as unhealthy without much thought, defining healthy can be much harder. Is nutrition based solely on calories, or is it about good fats vs. bad fats? There are so many questions when it comes to health. In hopes of cracking the code to health, researchers looked at some of the unhealthiest individuals -- the obese, specifically among Hispanic immigrants. What they found was shocking.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by robwallace11 on November 7, 2016
The wounds of the battlefield can truly follow you home.  Although the period of testing is nowhere near as long as the WW2, or Vietnam War the veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan have had many difficulties with PTSD.  The findings in the Clinical Psychological Review by Schnurr and Lonne conclude that veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are likely to experience poorer functioning and lower objective living conditions and satisfaction and have a lesser quality life.  This staggering conclusion really makes you wonder how deep the sacrifice is for war veterans.            

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by Richmond Huot on November 7, 2016
As technology continues to advance in the future, so will the enjoyment of videogames.  Videogames allow us enjoy a story first hand and do things beyond human limitations. These aspects contribute to why we do play them although sometimes the time invested may be too much and take away from life in reality.

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by nicholas_insana. on November 7, 2016
When the term “abrortion” comes up in a normal conversation between anyone a heated argument usually occurs. It is very hard for a solution to come about when most of the country is 50/50 about an important social issue. As this issue effects the male and female race it is mainly argued by the people that actually have the choice which are females. When it comes to voting women have won their rights and is currently not the problem, the new problem is abortion. Who is against is and who is for it and is it a personal choice?

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URI (University of Rhode Island)
by Giants86 on November 7, 2016
In previous years over 11,000 international police officers have been deployed in 18 United Nations peace operations. These officers have come from 100 countries. Over a period of time these officers have seen work such as traditional monitoring responsibilities and have started to see more of a broad array of police development and sector reform tasks. The issue with this is that the structures, resources and skill sets of international police do not match their mandates.

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by Emile David on November 14, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
    Is Sexual Racism  Really Racism?  

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by camilleouellet on November 14, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Caughy, O’Campo and Muntaner’s (2004) study observed the relationship between how African American parents experienced racism and on how was their preschooler children’s mental health. The authors also examined the influence of the families’ neighborhoods on the two other variables named above. The authors hypothesized that the African-American parents’ experience of racism and how they responded to it had an effect on their children’s development and mental health. They also wanted to study if the neighborhood’s conditions had any influence on the other variables.

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by NickG on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Amina Chaudhri and William H. Teale did a study called “Stories of Multiracial Experiences in Literature for Children, Ages 9–14” (2013) and the study wanted to see stories of multiracial experiences in literature for children. The study is looking for racial discrimination in books that children read (9- 14 years old), the studied books for children that are based on a multiracial main character. The study starts by showing that literature is a tool for people and kids in order to build an identity, which is most important for children.

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by B.Matthews on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
The role of societal privilege in the definitions and practices of inclusion by Karen Geiger and Cheryl Jordan (March 2014) study investigates the effects of inclusions upon those with societal privileges. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the societal privileges within the practice of inclusion. The authors do this to fully comprehend the meaning of privilege and to discuss the difficulties raised by this study.

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by ArianShamal on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Summary: In “Perceived Racism and Discrimination in Children and Youths: An Exploratory Study” (2010) by Bernstein, Garcia C., Pachter and Szalacha’s, the authors investigated the environment and the circumstances of ostensible racism and discrimination in children and youths. Although previous studies conducted by other researchers focused on the emotional and physical effects of racial prejudices in children, very little research has been conducted on the occurrence of racism in teenagers and children.

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by Mariam Mikhail on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
In his research, Ignatius Samuel interviewed 54 African American male adolescents measure the impact of culture on their perspective of help-seeking behaviors. He found that these individuals are less likely to seek help from mental health services especially if they were anteriorly involved with the juvenile justice system. The researcher chose male adolescents between the age of 15-17 that are either still receiving mental health services or that received help in the past.

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by Thormaclennan on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Swartz, Arogundade and Davis’ study (2014) focuses on the reflections of 164 students in a South African university in Cape Town, on their own personal experiences with the social structures and historical contexts of “white privilege” or any sort of un-earned advantages or disadvantages they feel that society gives them based upon certain attributes, either race, gender or sexuality. The study investigated the relationship between perceived experience with either societal advantages and disadvantages with race, gender, sexuality, etc.

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by Alexleonard3 on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Are Positive relationships, always positive outcomes?     Summary  

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by Alexleonard3 on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Are Positive relationships, always positive outcomes?     Summary  

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by Alexleonard3 on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Are Positive relationships, always positive outcomes?     Summary  

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by Samantha.S on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
           Harris et al’s (2012) study investigated the relationship between racial discrimination and health service use as well as experience amongst people living in New Zealand. Racism is determined to be a stressor that can have physical and mental health consequences, its exposure has been found to lead to general mistrust and avoidance of dominant culture institutions, including the health care system (Harris et al., 2012).

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by Shannonodowd on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Davis and Stevenson (2006) study investigated the relationship between racial socialization experiences and depression symptoms such as lethargy, low self-esteem, cognitive difficulties, social introversion, irritability, guilt, pessimism, sad mood, instrumental helplessness, and overall depression amongst black youth. The authors hypothesized that racial socialization contributes significantly to the depression of black youth.

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by Larbz on November 13, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
And the losers are…the Indigenous!

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by Diego on November 12, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Europe's 70-year Crisis; Terror in Paris. Alleged sex assaults in Cologne. The refugee crisis that has gripped the EU for more than a year is morphing into something else  

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by benjydrapeau on November 12, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
The Poisonous Relationship between Ignorance and Immigration                 Recently, a study made by Douglas L. Palmer (1996) drew my attention. In the study, he wanted to find an explanation for the amount of hatred and hostility towards immigrants Canadian citizens can show.

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by Amélie Coupal on November 12, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
      Beagan and Etowa’s (2009) study explored the relationship between African origins and occupational activities. To do so, the authors interviewed 50 African Nova Scotian women between the age of 40 and 65 years old. While other research focused on one particular place or event, Beagan and Etowa decided to study the more general damages of everyday racism. Everyday racism can be defined as routine. Indeed, they are simple, small comment that can be made as a joke.

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by Camille Cournoyer on November 10, 2016
Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
Summary: Patcher, Bernstein, Szalacha and Coll’s study investigated the way children perceive racism and in which situation they observe it, as well as the effects of discrimination and racism on them. The main hypothesis was that there is a positive correlation between children’s awareness of racism in their environment and their health condition, particularly if they are part of a group that constitutes a visible minority. The participants were children between 8 and 18 years old.

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3 years 1 week ago

Your article is very well written. It is very clear and easy to understand. I loved your title, it really stood out when I saw it and it got me very curious. A problem that I have with your post is that there’s no background information on Zimmerman case or the effects that it had. Next time try to provide a little more information about your topic so that the readers understand what it going on. I like how you included quotes into your post but they could have been integrated better. Next time try to integrate them into your sentences and not just shove them in like you did. Other than that I find that your post was very well done.

3 years 1 week ago

The title of your article drew me in and it intrigued me. It stood out from the other posts, so good job on that. The post itself is very descriptive and full of interesting facts that I didn’t know about. It was very clear to me that you analysed your article to better understand it before writing your post. However a problem that I have with your post is that some of your sentences were a little confusing and hard to understand. I had to re-read some of them a few times before I understood them. So for your next post try to make your sentences easier to understand. Also, you mention how Wendling is a reliable source because he is an educated and has a verified account on Twitter that is only given to people who are reliable and provide the truth. Are you sure that this point is accurate. Not everyone on Twitter is trustworthy and reliable. You should talk about how BBC itself is a reliable source. But other those small problems, you’re post was really well done and interesting.

3 years 2 weeks ago

I would like to begin with saying that the title of the article is what drew me in to your post. However, when I began to read it, I noticed that your main points are centered around quotes from the article. A tip for creating more of a flow to your sentences would be connecting each point you made to following points to be talked about. This technique allows for easier writing and allows the reader to process your ideas smoothly. I would suggest, when writing a summary of an article to actually summarize the topics with less quotations from the author. In addition, rephrase your sentences, explain/ summarize the article in a form that a reader may understand, review the proper way to make a quotation and to explain why the quotations function to the main idea of the article. Furthermore, when you are going to mention that the editor/author Carl Stoffers is a reliable source, maybe do a background check on his past to further explain why he might be seen as a reliable source. Not all journalists writing for The New York Times are seen as reliable sources, with this being said, doing more research on the author would help back-up your point of view as seeing him as a reliable source.

Reply to: Will You Wear it ?
3 years 3 weeks ago

This post intrigued me because It's not a topic you often hear about normally. As a little girl going to Halloween stores picking out a costume, I would have never thought how offensive it would be to see a costume of myself or a costume that represents Hispanic people being sold at a a Halloween store where some people would do the most and try to ''act'' like us Hispanics are as if we are merely characters in a TV show or a joke. I guess in a way you can say I was shocked by this post. If there was an African-American costume in my home town that looked like a gorilla suit, I'm pretty sure the people in my community wouldn't like that AT ALL. Knowing some of the people in my old high school, I'm pretty sure if they saw a non-African-American person wearing that costumed trying to act like the stereotypical black person, they would most likely jump that person meaning beat them up. I understand just getting a costume for fun being a indigenous person etc. in my eyes I believe it's okay as long as the respect for that culture is still there.

3 years 3 weeks ago

I was drawn to this post because stereotypes is something that bothers me a lot. I had a sad reaction to this post; It's terrible enough that adults and teens experience racism, but little children? That's so terrible to see and find out. Children who have experienced racism develop insecurities, anxiety, and depression. When you're young like that I believe that's the time to be carefree and happy all of the time and excited for what the world has to offer, not worry about who's going to accept you and who's not going to accept you. I remember being in the middle school and seeing all the little black girls always wanting to straighten their hair, they hated their natural curls. I also recall many times that some girls who didn't have their hair straightened would be very insecure with their curls and would just try to put it in a bun or put their hoodie or hat on whenever they could. I could tell they were't as confident with their natural selves. It's really sad honestly. I feel like they believed that having straight hair was the beauty standard besides their natural curls. No one ever told them that they looked terrible with their natural curls, they just assumed because every girl practically had straight to wavy hair at that age and according to their observations on society, that's what they believed to be the beauty standard. All that just by what they saw made a huge impact on their everyday lives. Young kids getting bullied for their ethnicity, now imagine how much that impacts them; the poor girl in the post didn't even want to eat or attend school. Kids can be cruel if they're influenced in the wrong way, which is why we need to teach our kids to always be kind and accepting of all.

3 years 4 weeks ago

This post caught my attention mainly because of the title, I wanted to see what the author meant by "The misinformation of the millennial generation and the hypocrisy of BLM (Black Lives Matter Movement)". I didn't have a good reaction to this post at all. Yes, you've done some research, but according to my observations in life and in this post, I don't believe you've done enough. I'm not sure how things are run in Canada, but here in the U.S. the justice system does have some institutional racism. There have been multiple cases where a white men who are college students get away with rape with just a slap on the wrist of probation, while black men get sent to prison for years for something like possession of marijuana, non-violent drug possession . White privilege is very much real in this world. Judges are more likely to be lenient with white people than minorities, and that's facts. Yes there are minority people who actually commit crimes then blame it on the black lives matters movement, but there have not been an outrageous amount of cases that stated that was the case without facts and supportive evidence. There are crazy people all over this world. It's not just black people. I agree with the fact that if you commit a crime, you should own up to it and deal with the consequences in a fair and reasonable manner. Racism doesn't only exist in North America; it's every where, all over the world I've witnessed it in Colombia, I visit a couple of times because I have family there. I had an old lady try to convince me to disown my black friends. One of my best friends visited Italy, and she witnessed her mom get discriminated against and refused to let her into a hotel because "there are no rooms available" as they help a white family register for a room; and they walked in after my friend and her mom (they were Cape Verdean i.e. black). These are real life experiences and they are recent events. How can you say racism only exists in North America if these situations are still a part of everyday life? Yes, segregation is no longer around, but that doesn't stop some people from keeping minorities from entering or utilizing a place or thing and just stating an excuse as to why they can't.
https://youtu.be/wzkGwpPI6IM
https://youtu.be/vj3v6E7Vf28
https://youtu.be/CIMrFTTEWOU
https://youtu.be/J-Tde65_Pd8
How would you explain these videos? These cases?

3 years 4 weeks ago

I was drawn to this post mainly because I would have never thought that white privilege could not only benefit white people, but minorities as well. My overall reaction to this post is a positive one; I agree with the authors point of view on the urgency to get white people involved with equality for minorities because it's more effective coming from a white person to another white person. It would be amazing for white people to use their privileges to make a greater change on equality for all. I personally never witnessed in real life white privilege, but I know for a fact it's real and out there in the world, everyone who's a minority is familiar with it. I also know a couple of friends and family who have witnessed it. I expect now that as a freshmen in college I will begin to witness and experience situations related to this topic now that I am becoming a part of the real world; back in my home town, you don't see as often on an everyday basis unless it has to do with the law.

3 years 1 month ago

This post caught my eye because the topic "mental health" is something I never used to believe in until these recent years. My reaction to this post is that I agree with practically everything. I agree with how discrimination, racism, and the environment you live in can affect one's mental health because if you're getting discriminated against or see people of the same race of yours getting discriminated against, it can lower your self esteem and make you feel attacked and insignificant. The environment that you're in can affect your mental health in many ways. For example, if you naturally have really curly short hair and everyone else has straight hair, a part of you is going to want straight hair so you don't feel like that one black sheep in the a crowd of white sheep; all of this especially when you are young. Growing up in my town and household, many minority people especially immigrant elders, don't believe in depression or anxiety and other mental illnesses. Our elders ( of minority people) are the people who raise us. My father ( Hispanic immigrant) doesn't believe in depression or anxiety actually being an illness that can actually impact your everyday life. My sister was diagnosed with depression and an anxiety disorder at a very young age and as she was growing up, my father believed that my sister was just being dramatic and that she just wanted attention so when she would go to counseling he believed that it was all garbage, that none of that sort of thing ever helps. For a while I thought the same thing until I experienced some things myself and observed my sister more throughout the years. Besides all of that, I know for a fact in many cases pride has a lot to do with many minority people not reaching out for help, also the chance of feeling vulnerable, exposed or looking weak in front of others is something many minorities tend to avoid even if it means refusing to reach out for help when you really need it. It's just something I've grown to realize through out the years in my community. I agree with advertising mental health awareness in schools and church's and campaigning the positive effects and results on therapy etc to make it more accepting to society for minorities and I also agree with the idea of adolescence in juvenile detention to attend therapy while they are still serving time.

3 years 1 month ago

I was drawn to this post because I find white privilege an interesting topic to discuss about, and I wanted to see what this post was more about. My overall reaction to this post was a mix of a couple of things. I was shocked to find that while reading this post, that some white people at the end of the study/course realized that they were in fact racist and that they admit to it. I believe that this study is a topic that should have more publicity to get society's attention on white privilege. I appreciated this post/study very much; it's not everyday that you see people getting educated on something like white privilege and developing more of an open mind to race in general and seeing how much they change for the better. This course seems like a powerful course that I would be interested in taking myself. I am a minority myself, a Hispanic, and back in my town it is very diverse and urban. When I began attending URI I noticed that all of the white people said that URI is extremely diverse, but if you ask any minority student they will tell you the complete opposite. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, and it isn't, but I have never been in environment where I was entirely surrounded by so many white people until I started attending URI. At my own orientation I was the only minority in my group besides my orientation leader and I felt pretty excluded from everyone. It was a cultural shock for me in many ways, to see how their perspective and ways of life are completely different than minorities. One of my closest friends who I have known since we were 14 years old attends URI and she went random for roommates, she ended up with two white girls and they didn't get a long at all. My friend explained to me how they genuinely don't realize that they are racist, I've witnessed myself the way they treated her. My friend called them out on it and called them racist and they practically lost their minds and immediately began denying that they were racist as soon as my friend flat out called them racists in the middle of their fight. I feel like, because everyone knows that being a racist is looked down upon, many white people choose to block out the fact that they could be racist. I'm sure that if they took a class on white privilege, they would have a raw harsh reality about it and possibly change their ways and have more of an open mind.

3 years 1 month ago

This post caught my attention because I believe it's a topic that needs to be acknowledged. This reminds me of the the Glass Ceiling Effect which is an unofficial barrier that prevents women and minorities from advancing simply because they are women or minorities. I'm not surprised some white women don't realize racism is still around in society especially in the work force and in the 21st century. In the main stream media it shows that a lot of minorities have broken through and have become very successful especially in pop culture which would lead many people to believe that racism in the the work force is not really as relevant, but many don't realize that it's still around. If just white woman alone don't make as much as men salary wise every year, for the same amount and type of work, then minority women would probably make even less. Minority women have to work harder just to be as successful because of the glass ceiling effect.

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert

  • Race and Racism Fall16 Gr.544

    This course will introduce students to the concepts of “race” and racism from the perspective of biological and cultural anthropology. The first part of the course focuses on the distribution of human biological variation and compares this variation to contemporary ideas about “race”. The second...

  • Race and Racism Fall16 Gr.545

    This course will introduce students to the concepts of “race” and racism from the perspective of biological and cultural anthropology. The first part of the course focuses on the distribution of human biological variation and compares this variation to contemporary ideas about “race”. The second...

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