Democracy & Cultural Diversity F2017

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by corinnearchambault on November 19, 2017
The Supreme Court of Canada decided to accept the construction of a ski resort in British Columbia even though First Nations claim it is a sacred land for them. The judge supported the explanation that the Charter right to freedom of religion does not have to protect the “focal point” of the worship, but the worship itself. The project has been an issue for 26 years, but it was not accepted until just now. The place in question is called Jumbo Valley and it is considered sacred by the Ktunaxa Nation.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Anonymous3 on November 19, 2017
Candice Malcolm, writer of news article “Our free speech is already under attack”, believes that freedom of speech is essential for a free society. She says it is not only about sharing oppositions to opinions you don’t agree with, rather, it’s purpose is to civilly debate with others on subjects including those we do not agree with. Debates are learning experiences, they expose people to different perspectives other than their own. Moreover, Canadians are united by the ability to take criticism from others and through the understanding of opposing views.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Anonymous3 on November 19, 2017
The article “Capital Punishment” written by Paul Gendreau and Wayne Renke explores the road to the death penalty abolition in Canada. In 1749, Peter Cartcel, a sailor, was hanged two days after his conviction for killing a man. Later, Robert Bickerdike, a Member of Parliament proposed a private bill suggesting the abolishment of capital punishment; it was rejected. The last two executed in Canada were Robert Turpin and Arthur Lucas in 1962.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by europe.newsactivist on November 18, 2017
Around the World, multiple events occur daily, many of which either positively affects democracy and diversity or affects them negatively, in Florida, such an event recently took place. About one month ago, anti-fascist activists started marching and rallying against Richard Spencer on the University of Florida, an estimated number of 1,000 people joined in the march (Strickland, 2017).

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Anonymous3 on November 16, 2017
Marital rape has been criminalised in most of the world since the 20th century, except for India. The article, “The marital rape debate” exhibits the very common issue of sexual abuse. Marital rape is when a spouse forces non consensual intercoarse upon their partner. Right now, domestic violence is considered a crime, thus, debate arose on if domestic sexual abuse should be punishable by law in India.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by cedleonard on November 12, 2017
Political tensions escalate inexorably in North America and some other places around the world. The highly polarized divisive political climate pushes apart extreme ying-yangs who demonstrate and protest in the streets, occasionally turning violent by both groups’ perceived opponent extremes, exactly what the climate is: polarization. In Québec, no doubt then, to see that there are strong nationalist groups for which Québecois identity is threatened by rising levels of immigration.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by corinnearchambault on November 12, 2017
Years after years, technological advances do not fail to surprise us and change our daily lives, but the imminent failure of culture to keep up with evolving information systems is a recurrent issue. This is why the Government of Quebec announced their implication and investment. This money will be distributed in different sectors of culture. For starters, the information press will receive $36 million over a five-year period to render their numerical technologies more actual and collect pertinent data more effectively.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by andrewricha98 on November 6, 2017
Tim Fontaine writes an article called “destroying personal accounts of residential schools would just compound the tragedy.” The author states that books give facts, but the accounts of each child that attended residential school have a story. Fontaine said that it’s sad to see the Supreme Court rule in favor of erasing these records. There are 38,000 testimonies of survivors of abuse and misery. These documents state’s the author, are proof of the reality that happened in these residential schools with precise details. It is a dark chapter in Canadian history.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by andrewricha98 on November 6, 2017
“Montreal adds Iroquois symbol to flag, Strips British general of the street name,” says Benjamin Shingler in his article posted on CBC News. One step forward for appreciating the impact of indigenous people that helped build this city. Furthermore, they will rename an existing street to an indigenous figure instead of a British general named Jeffery Amherst. The Mayor of Montreal added a white pine tree at the center of the flag which represents the Iroquois. This revelation happened on the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by andrewricha98 on November 6, 2017
“The federal government can’t Standby when minority rights are being trampled” is the name of Andrew Coyne article published on Montreal Gazette.  Quebec’s bill 62 is widely shamed, by all and contradictory. This law promotes “neutrality,” but it targets one religion, Muslims. It bans them from wearing their traditional religious symbols, like the niqab and burka that Muslim women wear. For the law to not be discriminatory, it spreads to other face-covering, like sunglasses, which are not related to any religion. The law implies anyone using public services.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by andrewricha98 on November 6, 2017
The Anglophones are exhausted, says an article in the Montreal Gazette. Gary D. Shapiro the author of “Forty Years After Bill 101, Anglophones are Tired, Apathetic” says that the OQLA (Office Québécois de la langue anglaise) was established in 1996 because the English language in Quebec was disappearing. In 2017, the OQLA is closing its doors, and the reason is lack of empathy. The author argues that it is important to show the injustice and abuse by the OQLF (Office Québécois de la langue française).

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by kimberlyS on November 4, 2017
This article discusses about before the Bill legalizing physician assisted suicide became legal in Canada. As an undergraduate medical student back in the 1970's, the author mentions that doctors were very uncomfortable with the idea of euthanasia. Ethical reasons were implied and when specialists had no choice but to ''pull the plug'' when the patient had no hope of survival, also worried specialists since it wasn't officially legal. The author brang in the term ''indirect euthanasia'', that was used before ''passive euthanasia'', which was concluded to be an ''appropriate care''.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Camillebouchard on November 4, 2017
  In the past month of October and even before that,  it was discussed that social media, especially Facebook, had a big impact on the democratic youth of our country. In his article for CBC News, Andrew Wherry lays out the reasons why Facebook can be a threat to a complete and accurate information source for political matters.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Camille A-G on November 4, 2017
In the past few months, a discussion has risen in the United States and internationally regarding athletes, especially football players, kneeling during the American national anthem. Clark Mindock, an American journalist, discusses and explains the debate around this controversial topic in an article for The Telegraph.   

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by cedleonard on November 3, 2017
The Catalan people have a distinct identity, which dates far back even before Spain formed, from that of Spaniards. They are one of the most distinct peoples in Spain, which led them, after the Franco dictatorial regime where its autonomy was suspended, to be one of the most self-governing regions of Spain, alongside with the Basque Country. On October 1st of 2017, another referendum, this time binding, was held by the Catalans, again with Spanish constitutional court opposition because steps toward independence are unconstitutional to an “indissoluble unit” Spain.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by kimberlyS on November 3, 2017
In this article, Roberts explains on how the youth are socially pressured by mainly the media. He targets mainly young girls since they are most likely to be the victims of oversexualization. The author pointed out that girls nowadays, feel as if they need to be sexually attractive or else, they feel invisible to society. If they don't ressemble the societal standards, it leads them to having for example: eating disorders, low self-esteem or/and depression.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by MishelAtaev on November 3, 2017
NBC has posted a video claiming that  the alt-right movement is caused and consists of gamers. The rise of the Charlotsville incident in August of 2017 was started in a app called Discord which allows gamers and friends to build a community together and interact with each other. The rise in popularity of Discord has also been noticed by the alt-right movement that are gamers.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by PProvencher on November 3, 2017
This article outlines the health risks and dangers associated with the use of marijuana. The experts say that chronic smokers under the ages of 25 are the demographic that are most at risk of being impacted negatively by the health hazards posed by marijuana.  Experts stress the importance of keeping the public informed about the dangers of smoking marijuana as the potential legalization is in the immediate future.  Some of the main issues with legalizing marijuana are said to be that pot efficiency with regards to treating chronic pain are lacking.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by PProvencher on November 3, 2017
The supreme court of Canada, after much discussion, ruled in 2006 to allow kirpans in Quebec schools. The vote was a unanimous 8-0 in favor of allowing this ceremonial dagger to be worn in schools by members of the Sikh religion. It was established, by the court, that the kirpan was never intended to be used as a weapon by the boy (Gurbaj Singh) and that it was an integral part of his religion and faith. This issue arose half a decade ago (2001) when the boy was playing in the school yard and his kirpan fell from his clothes.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Garvenski on November 3, 2017
After Trump’s policy that aimed to ban transgenders from military services, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly said that the transgender service members who sued the government were likely to win and that there was no valid argument on why there should be a ban, therefore, she advocated for the return to the initial situation. Trump had ordered that all who were found to be transgender should be discharged, countering Obama’s policy allowing them to serve.   

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1 day 3 hours ago

No, I do not think that's what we should do to repair the past wrongdoings. I think it is a good way to honor the fallen ones, but we should focus on helping today's communities by listening to their requests and acting in accordance. The decision of the Supreme Court should be modified and adapted to the requests of the Indigenous people. If they want to have their dark moments erased, they have the right to but we shouldn't be the ones deciding that. We should also dedicate a whole chapter of our history books on the residential school and the other assimilation attempts.

Reply to: Anglos give up
1 day 4 hours ago

I decided to respond to your post because I thought the article brought a different perspective from what I already know. Personally, I believe that the bill 101 is important mostly for public services such as stores, schools, hospitals, security department, etc. I think that this law is important to protect French in Quebec. As a province surrounded by English speaking provinces, it is hard to allow our language to thrive. French speakers have a long history of battling for their rights and culture and I believe that the struggle is still real. My mother tongue is French and I speak English also fairly well, but I believe I was advantaged by my schooling experience. I believe all young people should have that chance in education. I was able to attend a private school and to do enriched and even linguistic bath classes. In other words, my 6th grade was constituted of 2 days per week of English classes and 3 of French. This has allowed me to get better with this language. I was able to observe my friends and those who did not have such experiences were less comfortable and fluent. This was still true even with our high school English lessons. I believe, like you, that more importance should be given to making children bilingual by offering more thorough, complete and frequent English classes. As for the health care system, shops and security system, I believe that it is a major issue that should be addressed: the first language used should always be French and as a backup plan/security measure, one of the request should be for employees to be bilingual or even trilingual. Do you think it is reasonable to request for more qualified workers (speak multiple languages) in public services?

Reply to: The Catalan Crisis
1 day 8 hours ago

Thanks for the input. I disagree with the belief that a country's strength is its multiculturalism, because multiculturalism for the sake of multiculturalism is in and of itself not useful. It's like whether we have any color of skin. It's initially irrelevant. When any diversity becomes useful is when constituents integrate the cultures together under a common framework where every person or culture uses its strengths to the best extent and mitigating the negative effects of its flaws by being in conjunction with other cultures. But that's not cultures being diverse, that's individuals contributing to society and cooperating by offering the best they can offer, which others take and enrich by adding their best, in a big mix of ideas which can be useful and improve people's lives. That multiculturalism is a strength to a country is not true if another country comes along and opposes it. If State A has 75% support for something the state holds dear, and State B of equal population, technology, economy, etc. has five 20% population groups, with 60%, 30%, 50%, 30%, 80% support respectively (total: 50% globally), can we or can we not agree that State B is less strong in that position and if its constituent groups are less in agreement on that position? What if this position is military involvement in a conflict opposing A and B? State A is stronger than State B, then, because it's more decided than State B. That's not to argue that unity at all costs is the best way to go, that's to say that people being undecided or arguing against one another are less strong on an issue than people who do not argue against one another. But I get your point, there also exists advantages to the coexistence of different ideas and cultures. And in my example, State B might be better at diplomacy, which would give an advantage to it and the other state. War mostly isn't good, so when there's alternatives it's better to go with them instead of going in a conflict. My example might not be best at proving this, but the point of considering the example is that almost nothing is fully binary and we need to analyze ideas in better depth to extract better conclusions, and the point of the debate is to exchange ideas, and improve on one another's ideas, and when some of the ideas anyone presents are good, people an adopt them and gain from it. We're always intellectually evolving.

Spain doesn't seem to accept Catalan identity much, instead it wants Catalans to assimilate under the central Spanish identity, or, at least, put Catalan identity below Spanish identity to be with the other Spaniards under Spanish unity. Therefore the cohabitation of the Spanish and Catalan cultures isn't working very well because they don't have the common respect that is required for coexistence and cooperation. The critical part is of not unwarrantedly oppressing another culture. As I understand, Québec is not being actively suppressed by Canada. We have la Loi 101 to better guarantee one of the most core parts of our culture, which is language. The latest referendum in 1995 was very close, at 50.5 / 49.5, with the stay view winning. The turnout was extreme, at 93% of the voters having participated. Besides the strong feelings which might have been back then (the closer the other side gets to winning, the stronger your own side is pushed to get. Separatists and unionists that night must've been at peak involvements), a 50/50 split is not what I call an urge to secede from most of the population. The true numbers don't suggest a burning passion for secession, and we can't split Québec culture into two, because there's more to Québec culture than the separatist sentiment of some, we also have poutine, the cabanes à sucre, the sacres, the other general quirks of the Québec French dialect, litterature and music, and far more. We don't know exactly the numbers for Catalan opinion since the turnout of the last referendum was low, at 43% (suspected that most unionists boycotted the vote), but the 90% leave from the 1st of October Catalan referendum suggests at least 37% (90% of 43%) total leave votes. It doesn't mean that 63% would vote stay. It's for any vote that we might say "but it's not that much people who do hold an opinion." For Québec, that would be 46% leave people, it doesn't mean that 64% of people are stay people. Calculating from turnout and result some proportion of the population holding an opinion is only rough mathematics, and it's wrong to assert that this number is the actual number, because first there's uncertainty from the missing data of people who haven't voted, and second not everyone is fully for or fully against something. What about the people who don't mind either way, those patient, careful watchers who see the world unfold before them without much worry, not feeling a need for involvement? That's right, spectrum-minded thinking comes back again! If most people don't care much about something, there's still advantages to act out on the results on the vote, even if the result is "nothing". Stopping to care about something leaves room for other important things to be invested in. For example, in our case Catalans against Spaniards, leave means Catalans are independent from undue Spanish influence, stay means Spain has more power over Catalonia, and neutrality means "Let's focus on more important things than anyone's identity. We have a mutual respect on both sides, that's as much as we need. But now, we have economic growth to do, a public debt to fix, other problems to solve. If we cooperate, we're better off because we're not hindering each other". But if the issue is more distinct, for example because Catalans care about their identity, culture and people, then yes, we can have more decisive polling options to actually decide if yes or no there's a new country, but the core issue remains the same: only through a true, high-turnout referendum does the true numbers show, and in a legal, high-turnout peaceful referendum there'll be no lost votes on any side because there'd be no police brutality, no lost stay votes because none of the suspected boycotting would be there. However, if with the hypothetical true referendum we still get a majority of leave votes, that's democracy at work, and then Catalonia needs to stop giving even more metaphorical second chances to those who don't show up, because low turnouts are not excused if the voting conditions are more than acceptable. How democracy works requires people to show up, because to see the whole picture, a society's citizens' opinion as a whole, we need the biggest percentage of participation that we can. If they don't show up, too bad. If I gave you an opportunity, it'd up to you to catch the opportunity.

It may be true that coexistence and cooperation does strengthen Québec and Canada mutually, but Canada doesn't actively try to suppress Québec identity the way Spain does to Catalonia. We both agree there, there needs mutual respect and letting different cultures blossom freely as long as they don't threaten anyone's safety or anything. The non-aggression principle is one of the foundational principles for libertarianism, where people, by doing their thing without unwarrantedly imposing their will on others, thrive individually or cooperate with others in a mutually beneficial manner. In that framework, both sides of any exchange must want an action. If one side doesn't initially want, the other side can convince it until an agreement, but if a person or culture violates that principle, they necessarily turn authoritarian and don't stay accepted within that framework, because libertarians don't like authoritarians. That detour is to prove the point that a culture in a society must operate with respect of the society which it lives in and its other cultures, which might be pluralistic rather than multicultural, but I demonstrate that, at least to me using that logic, multiculturalism by itself isn't complete. It needs a common framework that its constituents need to adopt, and I'd argue that imposing the instruction of non-aggression is not a bad imposition. it's like imposing mutual respect (don't steal from people, don't hurt people, listen to what people have to say if they have something useful to say, say useful things if you come up with useful things), that's the only way to have civilization without barbarism, because without common grounds on which to operate, some people's authoritarian streaks will lead to outcomes that are bad to most cultures. Some people want to have their way no matter what, and without common grounds principles of mutual respect and civility, these people will justify to themselves many behaviours dangerous to others. As for your final question, I don't think I advanced that claim, but rather I say that distinct peoples should have the right to secede from their higher group, especially if that higher group disfavourizes them, and if Spain wants Catalans united with them again, it'll need to renegotiate its offers on the table. Not that an independent Catalonia would stop trading with Spain altogether, that would be very counter-productive, and this also holds true the other way around. Independent states of any size can cooperate with other independent states, and trading is a big thing that is practiced literally everywhere. It's profitable for Catalans to live their life how they want, without undue interference from Spain, if and since they're a distinct people with the right to self-determination.

I hope you read through. I'll be looking forward for further discussion opportunities.

3 days 13 hours ago

The report is biased. There was a lot of people involved in the alt-right. She excluded to many facts and focus on putting the blame on the gamers. The discord was probably used by a small number of people because it was easy to access an anonymous.
I think that games are made to be able to escape reality and that the anonymity provided by the usernames makes us feel secure when expressing our opinions. This is also the reason why people who wear a "mask" in real life, express there frustrations and their true feelings and opinion online. That is why there is hate speech in games.
In my opinion, the end of the video is hilarious because she found one gamer in the crowd there was and basically said that since he was a gamer so he was a criminal.

3 days 13 hours ago

As you said, it has nothing to do with their skills or themselves. However, group chemistry is of great importance in the army and I think that not every soldier is ready to accept transgenders. It is also easier to interact with people who share the same values or character. That is the reason why, maybe, a special division should be implemented. I also see the problem of isolating them. It could divide the soldiers in two factions but I think it could also encourage healthy rivalry among the division and improve their chemistry( even though they could do that without forming a separate division).

3 days 13 hours ago

As you said, it has nothing to do with their skills or themselves. However, group chemistry is of great importance in the army and I think that not every soldier is ready to accept transgenders. It is also easier to interact with people who share the same values or character. That is the reason why, maybe, a special division should be implemented. I also see the problem of isolating them. It could divide the soldiers in two factions but I think it could also encourage healthy rivalry among the division and improve their chemistry( even though they could do that without forming a separate division).

Reply to: Gamers or Haters
4 days 7 hours ago

I believe that this is definitely a hate speech issue, however, i agree with the previous comment in saying how it is not an XBOX issue because gamers do have the option of simply muting the other players. If someone is ignorant enough to spew out racist, homophobic or sexist comments than that is on them and even though yes, it may hurt the feelings of another player, XBOX should not be the ones taking the wrath for it. This can be applied to social media, if someone writes or says something hateful, than all freedom of speech platforms would have to look into censorship, however, this will be limiting human rights. Although i find it distasteful to get aggressive and say racial, homophobic or sexist slurs over a game or on any interactive platform, this should not be put on the shoulders of the creators of XBOX.

4 days 7 hours ago

I chose to respond to your post because this topic is very important and one that will help women who have been in situations like these that they have a voice and people are there to listen and help. The #MeToo movement on social media i found to be very inspiring because it is a breakthrough for women to come out and share their stories. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for women to be sexually harassed especially in the entertainment industry. There are many people out there being taken advantage of by others who feel like they have some sort of superiority over them. The comment that President Donald Trump made is extremely offensive; it encourages the degradation of women. It also sickens me that there have been instances where people have said how it is the women's fault if she has been sexually assaulted. Some say it is in the way they dress or the way they act. Just because a women may be in touch with her sexuality more than others does not mean whatsoever that "she was asking for it"!! I believe situations such as these ones should not be taken lightly and also that women should not feel ashamed to speak out about their stories.

4 days 9 hours ago

I chose to respond to your post because this is a very popular topic that i believe should be discussed more. To answer your question, i strongly suggest that the government should assist their integration rather than creating a separate division for these individuals. The reasoning why one might become a transgender is because they feel out of place at first and because they do not identify themselves with the gender they were born as. So why would we separate them from other members of the military, that would just contribute to making them feel out of place and classifying them. What does being transgender have to do with the skills one may possess in the military?

4 days 9 hours ago

I agree with your belief that Canada should practice physician assisted suicide because what it all comes down to is the "my body, my life, my choice" idea. Many argue that those who ask to be euthanized are thinking selfishly because they are not thinking of how their families would feel; but, hypothetically, if a loved one was in so much suffering that they asked for such a thing, wouldn't you want them to do whatever will make them feel better. I would think that seeing a loved one in so much pain would hurt the families as well that you would want what is best for them.

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