Chemistry and the Environment

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nancy.deng on September 9, 2017
In the article “Environment and Health Impacts of Household Solid Waste Handling and Disposal Practices in Third World Cities: The Case of Accra Metropolitan Area, Ghana” written by Kwasi Owusu Boadi and Markku Kuitunen explains how improper handling of solid wastes can trigger multiple health and environmental issues. As a location the authors chose to examine the rural area of Ghana in Accra. In the capital of Ghana, the researchers went ahead and interviewed 960 women that were head of their household and held a survey from June to August 2003.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by helicopter_bus on September 9, 2017
Coral reefs are not only to be looked at, they contain a large variety of species in which we humans use as our source of protein and as a source of our medically active compounds. The destruction in coral reefs are usually caused by human activities, diseases and climate change. Human activities such as over-fishing, destructive fishing practices and pollutions from pesticides and herbicides. Examples of diseases would be black band disease, white band disease and other band related diseases which are a type of fungus. Climate change is the largest cause of the loss of coral reefs.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by gabrielleca on September 9, 2017
Over the last three decades, coral biodiversity and cover have decreased significantly and are in danger. We might not think that coral reefs are that important, but in fact; they contribute to many things such as sustaining fisheries, protecting coast and tourism. Every year, the goods and services provided by coral ecosystems contribute to approximately 30 billion US dollars. This is why the increasing trend of coral bleaching and mortality needs more attention. It was found that these two phenomenon are directly related to changes in temperature and human activities.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by David Morin on September 9, 2017
By comparing two scenarios using different scientific models, five teams of researchers analyzed how an increase in natural gas accessibility could affect global energy supply and climate forcing in the future (McJeon 1).  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Rainertaycho on September 8, 2017
I lived in Philippines for more than half of my life and the first thing i noticed as soon as i moved here to Canada was how much more cleaner the air and place is. Since developing countries such as Philippines are growing not only in population but also economically, more garbage being thrown and neglected by road sides and canals are inevitable. What could be avoided though, is neglecting road side garbage, improper water and canal management and the protection of the countries' endangered species.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by louismekhael on September 8, 2017
A research was made by Danielle Green, a fellow in the Biochemistry Research Group at Trinity College in Ireland, on the impacts of plastic bags on the marine life. Her main questioning was about whether basic plastic bags or biodegradable plastic bags had the same effect on the oceans. After nine weeks of experiments, she found out that plastic bags diminished the quantity of microalgae by blocking the access to sunlight, oxygen and nutrients.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by AudreeSalerno on September 7, 2017
According to the article called “A comprehensive review of pesticides and the immune dysregulation: mechanisms, evidence and consequences,” written by Aram Mokarizadeh and other authors, the society is now aware of the tones of chemicals that kill living organisms on the planet. Although the use of pesticides have helped human agriculture a lot, their effects on human health are a huge concern and people have to seriously think about it.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by EzBillard on September 7, 2017
The article “Reframing Climate Change as a Health Issue”, written by Gary Humphreys, discusses how human activity, climate change and human health are all related. It begins by stating that WHO (World Health Organization) and the UN are researching how the decline in physical activity, climate change, and health are all connected. A couple of their major findings being that one in eight global deaths can be linked to air pollution, and how the change of climate alters the distribution of insects that spread deadly diseases, solidifying the link between the environment and health.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Jonma on September 7, 2017
I like the idea of electric cars, being a fan of technology myself, it is not hard to image how happy I would be to try a tesla or simply ride a nissan leaf. In the recent years, the Government of both Canada and USA have made many improvements to the highways isntalling many electric vehicule charging stations allong resting areas to help people travel long distance. I believe electric cars are the future and will cause less pollution. 

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by AudreyS on September 7, 2017
More and more we are talking about how oceans are getting extremely more polluted by plastic and other materials than before. This article which the title is “Drowning in litter” explains to us a bit more why it has so much a big impact on the marine life. A number that could help us visualize this issue is approximately 8 million tonnes of only plastic end up in the ocean each year. Yet, more than 690 species who live underwater are victims of these plastic wastes. The thing is that a majority of these marine species are attracted by the smell of plastic and mistake it with their food.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by gabrielleca on August 29, 2017
Indeed, the increasing mass of electronic waste is becoming the fastest-growing waste stream on the planet. This is due to the very rapid flow of new products that are put on the market everyday, which encourages consumers to always buy new devices and get rid of their old ones. In 2014, the Global quantity of E-waste generated was 41.8 million tonnes and may rise up to 65.4 millions in the current year. The number of chemical elements that can be found in E-waste goes up to about sixty and may contain lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, etc.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by James Coyle on August 29, 2017
The article "Hydrogen or Fuel Cell - Which Comes First?" by Bruce E. Wood examines the plausability of replacing fossil fuels with hydrogen fuel or fuel cells. Although there is agreement that we need to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, there is debate as to how we should do this. Energy policies imposed by the United States government have encouraged a move towards the use of hydrogen and or fuel cells. The problem with this is that as of the time this article was written, hydrogen is not abundantly available and fuel cells are too costly.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by louismekhael on August 29, 2017
Humans have suspected a relationship between air pollution and some health problems since a while now. In fact, after a few studies, scientists found out that the pollution in the air causes health disorders like infertility. After they have looked into the link between the exposure of humans to environmental air pollutants and fertility, research proved that the bad air quality has a negative impact on both genders gametogenesis. This brings many disadvantages to the gametes, it affects their quantity, quality and it can also affect the embryo development.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by David Morin on August 29, 2017
As Pascual and al. explain, because of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES), emitters of greenhouse gases can compensate their climatic impact by paying an amount of money that will fund and allow a project of ecosystem conservation somewhere else in the world (Pascual 1). Hence, as the authors mention, the PES gives value to such services as carbon sequestration and water regulation (Pascual 1).  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nicolasM on August 29, 2017
                 Although the effects of smoking cigarettes on ones body are now very well known to indivuals who decide to partake in the hazardous activity, the effects that growing the tobacco plants have on the environment in which they are grown remain a minimal issue for most if not all cigarette smokers. Tobacco plants require a lot of potassium to grow into fully mature plants almost 6 times as much as regular crops (Matt cokely 2008) and before the tobacco leaves can be shipped off to manufacturers they have to be dried.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by AudreeSalerno on August 29, 2017
The increasing presence of plastic in the ocean is a serious environmental issue that needs an urgent response. In fact, according to the United Nations Environment Programme, (UNEP), plastic litter and microplatics are accumulating in the marine environment. A study in 2011 revealed that plastic made objects such as fishing nets, bottles, ropes, shoes and toothbrushes are forming tons of waste.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by helicopter_bus on August 28, 2017
Consuming vegetation as the main source of food in our daily lives is in fact harmful to our environment and ourselves. The amount of genetically modified organisms in our food is not only unnatural, which is what fruits and vegetables are supposed to be, but while we spray our crops with pesticides, it is killing all the micro-organisms in the soil. Intensely farmed crops like soy and corn that are often genetically modified to keep away pesticides are given to animals in their feed.

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9 months 3 weeks ago

I think you have provided a very interesting analysis of the original article and of this conflict as a whole.
In general, I agree with what you have said, except for a few points on which I would like to add another perspective.

First, I don’t really understand the point stating that Israel is more criticized than other countries such as Syria and Iraq even though these two kill many more people. In fact, I don’t know which are the sources used by the original text’s author to say that Israel’s government is more criticized than Syria’s government and ISIS; I mean, aren’t our media constantly criticizing the atrocities committed by Bashar Al-Assad and ISIS for the past few years? Of course, I agree with the fact than the religious dimension of this conflict is present and exacerbate it, as you have argued. However, I don’t think that Israel is more criticized by the global medias because of some anti-Semitism of some sort and I think we need to be careful not to slip on such discourse. I think that the religious dimension is present, but that it happens on both sides; there is probably anti-Semitism among some Muslims, as there is Islamophobia among some Jews. Briefly, I think you agree with me on the idea that this conflict is so contentious not because of a sort of media’s anti-Semitism, but rather because of its origins, which is the creation of the Israeli state, its international geopolitical dimension, its persistence and its religious dimension.

Moreover, I think that we are allowed to criticize one country for the atrocities it commits, even though another country is worse; one does not prevent the other, we can criticize both. I also believe that the author far underrates the number of deaths Israeli government has caused (https://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/priority-countries/israel-and-occupied-p...).

I think we need to recognize that both the Hamas and the Israeli government commit atrocities. It is interesting that the author of the original article develops these atrocities, although he does seem to have his own bias for Israel. However, the problem is that the Palestinian civilians are the first one to suffer from Israeli attacks, while Israel has the means to defend itself from Hamas’ attacks. I think that the Hamas does in fact use human shields to discourage Israel to attack their military bases. It might seem very cruel as a strategy, and it is, but considering the lack of resources of the Hamas to fight Israel, does it really have the choice? I think that the decision of Israel to keep trying to bomb Hamas, even though they know that they will kill civilians by doing so, is very cruel too. Of course, Hamas is a violent organization, but it is also a response to Israel’s violence towards Palestinians. Instead of continuing bombing Hamas and killing civilians simultaneously, I think that Israel, which is in a privileged position, should stop its violent actions and take the lead of peaceful negotiations.

As you have concluded, both sides commit atrocities, but one of the two, Israel, has a privileged position while committing them. I think we must always protect the weaker, and in this case, these are the Palestinians. I hope our governments will soon understand that; I hope the USA will stop financing Israel for geostrategic purposes and I hope the Liberals of Justin Trudeau will stop condemning such pressure movement over Israel as the BDS like they actually do for similar reasons (http://quebec.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/02/22/motion-israel-justin-trudeau_...).

10 months 1 week ago

Erika, whilst reading the first sentences of your blog submission, I immediately knew that I was going to be taking your side and that we shared a common opinion about the cultural inequalities going on in the United States. I too believe that a big root part of the problem lies in the decreased opportunities and reduced access to adequate education and healthcare, which I believe is in itself an institutional problem (systemic racism). I found it especially interesting that you chose ‘neighbourhoods’ to combine with race as important variables to take into consideration when looking at one’s chances of finding proper employment and success, and I believe this to be entirely valid as environmental factors have been proven to be highly influential in cases of cultural differentiation and discrimination (In minority groups). I believe that this post is especially relevant when I look back at the class material me and my class covered earlier this year concerning systemic racism and how it can directly and in-directly affect people’s lives in such a grandiose manner. In common manner, I also believe that change lies in the way we deal with cultural stigma and how we’ll proceed with reforming the structural problems that cause such flagrant inequalities.

1 year 1 week ago

Hey there! Thanks for your feedback, i'll work on making my next reflective essay more coherent with current information! The source itself that I used was provided by the teacher, and needed to be referenced for our assignment to be valid!

1 year 1 week ago

Hi there! Thanks for your feedback, i'll work on getting a more relevant source for my article. Seeing as this was a reflective assignement submitted to us by our teacher, we had to use the reference source she provided (hence the outdated source), I also wanted to include my own opinions and observations about the topic and keep it focalised around that; not wether what i wrote was scholarly or not!

1 year 10 months ago

The raw sewage dump is a really interesting topic that I feel like should be brought more into detail.

1 year 10 months ago

I really agree with your viewpoint. It is unjust that women are put down for their intellect and seen as inferior in the work field. I'm glad that people are noticing this issue and speaking up about it; its time for women to group together and empower each other and rise above the expectations.

2 years 5 days ago

I agree with your argument about the dislike button on facebook. But I have to say that it is a inductive argument because all your arguments makes me feel like the all thing is probable, but it is not certain. I am convinced by your argument and in my personal choice I believe it would be true but it is not 100% sure. I do not accept your conclusion because even if there is an argument that demonstrates us it will be true, when you use a relevant figure of authority "Dr. Paula Durlofsky" as an example and that makes your text more convincing, the conclusion is not certain. In addition, your text is based on frequency of occurrence. Maybe if you would have put real statistics and research it would have been deductive. so, I don't accept your conclusion for these previous reasons.

2 years 1 week ago

Hi, I found your article very interesting but at some point there are parts that I believe are not clear or complete. When you mention the statements of David Gutierrez, I found it quite vague because I think it can't be true that when you are protecting your skin with sunscreen that you are also destroying nearly "all" life in the oceans. I found this statement not convincing because you are concluding one thing to prove another, I think it is a false dilemma. Secondly, when you say: « ...therefore diminish the risks of skin cancer, "but based on tests", sunscreen users actually have higher rates of skin cancer! », we don't have any proof of those tests. Is there a specific name or specialist that did those tests? Your sentence might be convincing, but I think there is a lack of information here. Maybe I'm wrong but I will consider this mistake for a fallacy of ignorance because something important is missing, such as the name of the scientist or the good authority that made that study. Have a nice day!

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