Culture

Film and Modern History (Fall 2017)

English

This course focuses on the use of film to portray modern history and the representation of the twentieth century through the medium of film. As one of the main ways that people access history, film plays an important (albeit sometimes problematic) role in the construction and representation of the past. This course examines how films construct a particular version of the past and how thsi informs our understanding of history and the events of the twentieth century. 

Foreign Language Cinema Winter 2015

English

In this course, Modern Languges students learn about the cultures that are related to the languges they study, by viewing and discussing foreign language films.  The Newsactivist site is intended to allow for a collaborative platform where students can discuss specific topics related to the various films they view in class. This online site also facilitate the virtual collaboration with students of the University of Potsdam, Germany who are enrolled in a course with Prof. A. Knoth, titled, "Changing Welfare. Changing States? Comparative Social Policies Revisited by Gender."  

 

Contemporary Issues Winter 2015

English

This course is designed to introduce students to the essential concepts of Sustainability; a cross disciplinary field, integrating the economic, environmental, and social (socio-political) concerns. Students will conduct inquiry into the social, political, environmental and economic impact of contemporary and emerging global issues through the lens of sustainability. This course consolidates learning across the disciplines to empower students as agents of change for a sustainable and equitable future.

Media Ethics (Section 10)

English

Studies suggest that the average Canadian spends 31 hours online and 14 hours watching TV every week.  Many of us also listen to the radio while driving, read the newspaper in the metro, and are bombarded with advertising everywhere we go. It is therefore hard to deny that the media plays a major role in our lives. But the media is hardly ethically neutral and it presents us with moral conundrums on a daily basis.

Media Ethics (Section 09)

English

Studies suggest that the average Canadian spends 31 hours online and 14 hours watching TV every week.  Many of us also listen to the radio while driving, read the newspaper in the metro, and are bombarded with advertising everywhere we go. It is therefore hard to deny that the media plays a major role in our lives. But the media is hardly ethically neutral and it presents us with moral conundrums on a daily basis.

Media Ethics (Section 07)

English

Studies suggest that the average Canadian spends 31 hours online and 14 hours watching TV every week.  Many of us also listen to the radio while driving, read the newspaper in the metro, and are bombarded with advertising everywhere we go. It is therefore hard to deny that the media plays a major role in our lives. But the media is hardly ethically neutral and it presents us with moral conundrums on a daily basis.