The Notion of "Human Races"

by SimDes07 on September 16, 2016 - 3:23pm

The notion of “human races” is a well-known subject that can be discussed and argued a lot. In general, humans tend to subjectively separate themselves in groups, based on variable human traits.

 

According to Jared Diamond’s article “Race Without Color”, the classification of humans defines our views of other peoples. It stimulates our subconscious differentiation between categories like “us” and “them”, and promotes socioeconomic and political discrimination (Diamond, 1994, para. 5). In other words, human traits that we perceive with our eyes help us to classify humans into different categories, called “races”. The concept of “race” for me appeared when I started working in a warehouse in the industrial park of Boucherville. The other employees of the warehouse were from different countries with different origins and background, kind of human diversity. I worked full time during all the summer. That been said, I had the opportunity to discuss with my colleagues during our work shifts. I had the chance to talk with them about different subjects such as where they came from, their personal background, their future projects and their objectives. To be honest, the first time I saw the group, I said to me that I will work with people of different “races”. At this time, I used the word “races” without knowing the real signification of it. This false opinion was based on visual traits such as skin color, physical appearances and eye shape. As the weeks went by, I slowly realized that these employees and I, even if they were visibly different, shared some common interests. For example, one of the employees that I worked with was born in Algeria and arrived in Quebec when he was ten years old. I had some discussions with him while we were working and I learned that he was also playing in a soccer team during summer, was working because he wanted to buy a new car, and worked week-ends during school for paying his expenses. Hence, my colleague and me can be considered as different “races” because of our physical traits and origins, but we had common interests that make us not as different as others can think at first sight.

 

In conclusion, it is false to think that humans can be classified into races, because the concept of human “race” is not possible according to science. In fact, I think that we don’t have to see each other as different races, but as a society that shared common interests.

 

 

Bibliography

 

Diamond, J. (2016, Winter). Race Without Color. In A. Nouvet (Ed.), Anthropology 381-101-LA: The Myth of Race and the Reality of Racism. Saint-Lambert, QC: Champlain.

 

Word count: 407 words

Comments

Hello!,
I was attracted to this article because I was curious in finding out more about what you meant by the notion of "human races". I really enjoyed the example you gave about your personal experience with your colleagues. It really added something special to the piece because you gave a clarification of what you meant by how we should not see each other by race but by who we are. The example drew me into the reading even more because it reminded me of a time when I let myself not be restrained from what others around me were talking about when most people in my school were talking about people who are of African American descent and all the stereotypes that came along with it. I, decided to ignore those stereotypes and decided to befriend some special people, who happened to be black. When you said "I think we don't have to see each other as different races, but as a society that shared common interests", I automatically agreed because once I got to know those two girls who I now call one of my dearest friends I know that we can't classify humans by race.
In addition, this made me start thinking about how this issue affects people who are trying to get a job or wanting to do something but restraining from ever even trying it because they are afraid of getting remarks about their race and the socioeconomic stereotypes. Once we start discovering who that person is, in the inside, our society gets a little better.

Hello, I appreciate your viewpoints and the way you used evidence to back them up, but i respectfully disagree. To say that we should not classify humans into race is just not practical. each different race, has its own culture and customs and there is no arguing that. It is not science, it is a way of life that has been built generation after generation. Although it would be nice to view us all as the same, it is simply not possible. Now do not confuse my words. I do not intend to say that any one race is less significant or more important than the other, The way i look at it is that my way of life, and the way of life of a young Hispanic male living in Spain is totally different. Not to say one is more important than the other. I think we should acknowledge our differences in race while living our own lives because at the end of the day we are all our own people, even within our own race.

I loved how you really used your own personal background to make it more relate-able and understandable. You explained you opinion very thoroughly and well. I agree with the fact that most people distinguish race with their eyes instead of learning more about the person. It gives the same idea as judging a book by its cover which everyone does and not just with race but many other things as well. I think if we truly worked hard at trying to view or society as more of a cohesive whole that slowly we would see change, but the ignorance of most people heavily out ways the thoughts. This Isn't to say that we cant all have our own diverse backgrounds but its more to say that we can celebrate our races instead of frown upon anything that doesnt appear to be our own.

I have always been fascinated by humanity's obsession with race. Since our earliest days, we have felt an urge to divide up our species based on trivial characteristics- such as skin color. I was drawn to this article because of its take on the race issue, which I believe to be true. The reality of race is this- it doesn't really exist. In truth, race was a social construct invented by humans to divide up our species so that groups deemed most "dominant" could enslave those deemed "inferior." This method of thinking is inherently flawed, however, since all humans begins are descendants from the same people. I completely agree with the point you make in the conclusion- "It is false to think that humans can be classified into races," because race isn't actually a scientific reality. This is the truth, and until society can realize that we will never live up to our full potential. I also liked how you used a personal experience to explain your point, as it helps make the article more relate-able.

I was interested in this article because I wanted to know what "human races" meant to you. I really liked how you described it to be "...human traits that we perceive with our eyes help us to classify humans into different categories..." I also admired you sharing your personal experience to support your argument, which made it more interesting for readers. I can relate to this experience because at my high school, people would not "judge a book by its cover" per se and instead make friends with people that share common interests such as playing soccer or photography.
I agree with your statement about how humans don't have to see each other as different races instead, like people at my high school, they can be a society that express common interests and look past what just meets the eye.

I was interested in this article because I wanted to know what "human races" meant to you. I really liked how you described it to be "...human traits that we perceive with our eyes help us to classify humans into different categories..." I also admired you sharing your personal experience to support your argument, which made it more interesting for readers. I can relate to this experience because at my high school, people would not "judge a book by its cover" per se and instead make friends with people that share common interests such as playing soccer or photography.
I agree with your statement about how humans don't have to see each other as different races instead, like people at my high school, they can be a society that express common interests and look past what just meets the eye.

Hello, thank you for your blog post! I appreciate the idea that we shouldn't characterize people by race, but I personally think it is necessary in our society. I believe that using race as classification is one of the oldest and most common way humans have been grouped. While this has lead to some very unfortunate and corrupt situations, it's unrealistic to stop using it. Along with this, I think it is important to be proud of where you come from, and ignoring race would take this concept away. Our cultures are some of the most valuable and influential aspects of our lives. Trying to keep race out of our identity would take our culture out as well. Acknowledging that we are all different and come from different places is what keeps us all unique and what gives us all different outlooks and perspectives on life. I believe that keeping race as an identifier, not necessarily the main one- but one none the less, is an important tool we use. No race should ever be labeled as superior than another, rather each race should be called equal. But race in itself is how we connect to our culture and where we were from. I think over time we have ruined the simplicity that is our races, we made it into a competition but its truly just a part of us that we cannot, and should never want to change.

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