Man or Woman: What's the point?

by kwolf4 on October 18, 2016 - 6:52pm

       There are two recognized types of gender, a man and a woman. There are many types of gender roles of a man and a woman placed by society. The ideas of how one should act and behave, but sometimes this idea are unwelcomed. Stereotypes play a predominate role with society and influences what people believe. People in society are able to go against these stereotypes and be who they want to be. People can break free from stereotypes to be more individualistic. However, stereotyping has control over people, the way they see other people of the same and opposite gender and how they see themselves. But stereotypes are needed to categorize people., so that it is easier to identify someone. Even though they are not always welcomed or true to each individual.it just helps society to stereotype that someone is man or woman. People are different and that’s the main point. People need to know who they are and be okay with it.

http://www.glaad.org/transgender/transfaq

Comments

I enjoyed your article because it is very true, we are all different and if you think about it language is really just classifications we use to communicate to each other. The more I look at the genetic differences between men and women the more I see that we are built to compliment each other (whether by god or natural selection) which is important to remember. Some things women are just better at and vise versa, we work best when we work together and that goes for all stereotypes.

I really enjoyed reading your post and I agree with you on many points. Your article caused me to question why we label sex at birth at all? Especially with so many different qualities that can identify people as male or female such as genitalia, gonads, chromosomes, etc., these labels are often incorrect and there is no medical reason causing their use. Should we do away with labeling children at birth all together?

Hello kwolf4,

Great post! You pointed out some solid arguments. I too believe there are many stereotypes that are unfair for many individuals, but like you said; people resort to stereotypes to identify each other. In my opinion, I see gender as a physical categorization. A man and woman's body is designed through evolution to mate with each other and produce offspring to keep our race going, like all other mammals. I see gender as a natural feature of the body. What is your opinion on what determines one's gender, and do you believe we should identify genders at birth?

Hi there. I must say that i don't agree with your post or your argument. A man and a woman are distinguished by the body parts they have not the "roles" they play in the world. The human race is the only species that want to change our gender role. May i ask why is that? We are born by being labeled. We label everything. everything that we research is labeled. that's just how the human mind works. Why not accept who you are born to be and achieve anything and everything want want?

Hello,

As you mentioned there are various types of gender roles for a man and a woman in society. I believe that this is almost an expectation that some may have. I would agree that this idea is unwelcomed. I was raised to believe that I can do anything regardless of my gender. Why would anyone not have the ability to do something based on their gender? Seems alittle silly if you ask me, but still societies of the past and some present today have this mentality. I think that how someone is raised in what mainly influences ones beliefs on stereotypes. Sure stereotypes has control over what other's immediately perceive, but that does not mean that this defines a person. Why do you think that we need stereotypes to categorize and identify people? I would like to believe that there does not have to be a "social norm" that society has to adapt to, rather we should each be an individual person that represents themselves (and all their morals/values). It is said to say that society is built on such stereotypes. My hope for the future is that this will change and allow everyone to be comfortable in their own shoes.

Hello,

As you mentioned there are various types of gender roles for a man and a woman in society. I believe that this is almost an expectation that some may have. I would agree that this idea is unwelcomed. I was raised to believe that I can do anything regardless of my gender. Why would anyone not have the ability to do something based on their gender? Seems alittle silly if you ask me, but still societies of the past and some present today have this mentality. I think that how someone is raised in what mainly influences ones beliefs on stereotypes. Sure stereotypes has control over what other's immediately perceive, but that does not mean that this defines a person. Why do you think that we need stereotypes to categorize and identify people? I would like to believe that there does not have to be a "social norm" that society has to adapt to, rather we should each be an individual person that represents themselves (and all their morals/values). It is said to say that society is built on such stereotypes. My hope for the future is that this will change and allow everyone to be comfortable in their own shoes.

I think that this topic of discussion brings very interesting viewpoints to the table as there is much discussion on the topic currently occurring. Unfortunately I found it difficult to clearly understand the argument on the topic you were making, potential restructuring of some of your sentences may improve the position you are taking. I enjoy the point you make regarding how stereotyping is a large driving factor that is starting this debate, do you potentially think that identifying someone as a male or female can have other negative repercussions? Some of these repercussions include gender inequality. This discussion could bring up the argument that some people may not want to identify as a specific gender in order to avoid these inequalities. I think by possibly addressing these points this post could have the workings to be very informative and interesting!

Thanks for sharing this article with us, I found your post to be engaging and very true. I think that there are far too many stereotypes and perceived roles in today’s society. It seems as though a lot of people struggle finding their place in society because of these clear cut existing roles. I think that is it essential and necessary that they are broken down, so as a population we can move past this issue. Our gender should not limit who we are, or how we behave in a society. Do you think that these stereotypes should be abandoned, or do you think that this is an issue we can never tackle?

Thanks for sharing this article with us, I found your post to be engaging and very true. I think that there are far too many stereotypes and perceived roles in today’s society. It seems as though a lot of people struggle finding their place in society because of these clear cut existing roles. I think that is it essential and necessary that they are broken down, so as a population we can move past this issue. Our gender should not limit who we are, or how we behave in a society. Do you think that these stereotypes should be abandoned, or do you think that this is an issue we can never tackle?

Thanks for sharing this article with us, I found your post to be engaging and very true. I think that there are far too many stereotypes and perceived roles in today’s society. It seems as though a lot of people struggle finding their place in society because of these clear cut existing roles. I think that is it essential and necessary that they are broken down, so as a population we can move past this issue. Our gender should not limit who we are, or how we behave in a society. Do you think that these stereotypes should be abandoned, or do you think that this is an issue we can never tackle?

Hi there!
Thanks for your post! I enjoyed reading it, and I think it touches on a pressing issue in contemporary societies. Unfortunately you're exactly right, there are many stereotypes surrounding women's capabilities in the workforce, when really there should not be a distinguished difference between what a man and woman can and cannot do in the workplace environment. People can absolutely break free from these stereotypes, as you said above, and I think with the social awareness in today's day-and-age, we are doing a better job at breaking these social confines.
I believe there is a lot more work to be done, but we have contributed to a good start!

Thanks again!

Very fascinating post Kwolf4!
I completely agree that it can be quite difficult for certain people to completely conform to the expected behaviors of their respective genders because we are all different. Therefore, I think you bring up an important issue because we are starting to see more and more people break free from these stereotypes by not conforming to gender norms in order to be “who they truly are”. As much as you pulled out some solid arguments, I must disagree with you on the fact that there are only two recognized types of gender. Contrary to sex, gender can be classified into 63 different categories. Accordingly, there are two categories for sex, female and male and in a small minority of cases intersex and these categories are differentiated through biological markers and chromosomes. On the other hand, gender is separated into binary gender and non-binary gender categories. Gender binary is a model of gender that classifies all people into one of two genders according to their genitalia and biological markers. However, non-binary gender describes any gender identity which does not fit within the binary of male and female. (List of Nonbinary Identities) Therefore, according to the online article “The living Rede”, there are over 63 different genders, including genderqueer, genderfluid and polygender. Furthermore, I also disagree with you on your use of the term stereotypes in order to “categorize people, so that it is easier to identify them.” I believe that the proper word to describe these categories would be the term social construct. According to the Encyclopedia, “a social construct is an idea or notion that appears to be natural and obvious to people who accept it but may or may not represent reality, so it remains largely an invention or artifice of a given society.” (Social constructs) Social constructs are the results of the creation of these categories and labels to make sense of the world. All in all, a very informative and engaging post and I agree that at the end of the day, gender should not limit who we are and how we behave in society.

Works Cited
Gallagher, Brian. "- 23 -." The Living Rede. N.p., 2004. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.
"List of Nonbinary Identities." Nonbinary Gender Visibility, Education and Advocacy Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.
Social Constructs." International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences., "Social Constructionism." International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences., and "social Constructionism." A Dictionary of Sociology. "Social Constructs." Encyclopedia.com. HighBeam Research, n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Very fascinating post Kwolf4!
I completely agree that it can be quite difficult for certain people to completely conform to the expected behaviors of their respective genders because after all, everyone is different. Therefore, I think you bring up an important issue because we are starting to see more and more people break free from these stereotypes by not conforming to gender norms in order to be “who they truly are”. As much as you pulled out some solid arguments, I must disagree with you on the fact that there are only two recognized types of gender. Contrary to sex, gender can be classified into 63 different categories. Therefore, I think you may be confusing the terms sex and gender. Accordingly, there are two categories for sex, female and male and in a small minority of cases intersex and these categories are differentiated through biological markers and chromosomes. On the other hand, gender is associated with behaviors and roles and is separated into binary gender and non-binary gender categories. Gender binary is a model of gender that classifies all people into one of two genders according to their genitalia and biological markers. However, non-binary gender describes any gender identity which does not fit within the binary of male and female. (List of Nonbinary Identities) Therefore, according to the online article “The living Rede”, there are over 63 different genders, including genderqueer, genderfluid and polygender. Furthermore, I also disagree with you on your use of the term stereotypes in order to “categorize people, so that it is easier to identify them.” I believe that the proper word to describe these categories would be the term social construct. According to the Encyclopedia, “a social construct is an idea or notion that appears to be natural and obvious to people who accept it but may or may not represent reality, so it remains largely an invention or artifice of a given society.” (Social constructs) Social constructs are the results of the creation of these categories and labels to make sense of the world. All in all, a very informative and engaging post and I agree that at the end of the day, gender should not limit who we are and how we behave in society.

Works Cited
Gallagher, Brian. "- 23 -." The Living Rede. N.p., 2004. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.
"List of Nonbinary Identities." Nonbinary Gender Visibility, Education and Advocacy Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.
Social Constructs." International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences., "Social Constructionism." International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences., and "social Constructionism." A Dictionary of Sociology. "Social Constructs." Encyclopedia.com. HighBeam Research, n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

I think you raised a lot of good points that can be addressed both formally and informally in the societal realm. In terms of gender roles, there are overt factors such as fashion styles and media pressure, but I often wonder if people look deeper and see institutional gender role discrepancies. Instances that come to mind are the wage gap and the lack of woman involved in politics and positions of economic authority. There is debate within the academic world surrounding women's inherent emotional attachment to issues regarding the environment and peaceful negotiation. Would having more woman in politics increase our chances towards world peace, and do they really hold more value to the role of being an environmental advocate? Its funny to see how much gender is relatable to every aspect of life, something as simple as the reference of "mother nature" forces us to consider the way we analyze entire categories of life, extending beyond individuals actions and choices.

Fukuyama, F. (1998). Women and the evolution of world politics. Foreign Affairs, 24-40.
http://www.thegreenmarketoracle.com/2012/03/women-are-more-environmental...

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