The Controversial Wage Gap

by Emule on October 13, 2016 - 2:14pm

While the wage gap is a widely controversial topic, it does indeed exist. However, what most people do not realize is that this wage gap might be in place for a good reason. The United States percentage as a whole says that on average women get around 80% of the pay that men receive annually. That means if a man is making $100,000 annually, that on average depending on the state, a woman would make around $80,000 doing the exact same job with the exact same qualifications.

There are multiple factors that further affect the wage gap, these are things such as: race and ethnicity, occupation and education, and caregiving. Some occupations such as truck driving, have a much higher wage gap in comparison to an occupation in care giving. Also pregnancy and motherhood comes into consideration, this can be looked at in two different ways. One way is to side with the mother and look at is as unfair that the woman is getting penalized for a natural thing in life. Another way is to look at is from the employers side and calculate all the costs that come with allowing a mother paid leave. If an employer was to pay women the same amount of men and also give them paid leave when they have a child then the company would go into debt by a very large sum of money. The wage gap in a way helps them maintain their company’s finances. A possible solution to solve the bias toward women who do not have or plan to have children is for them to sign an agreement that states if they do take child leave then this will not be a paid leave.

Whether or not this wage gap can be solved in a timely matter is a whole other story.

 

Works Cited

FAQ about the Wage Gap. (2013, September). Retrieved from http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/wage_gap_faqs_sept_2013.pdf

The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap (Fall 2016). (n.d.). Retrieved October 13, 2016, from http://www.aauw.org/research/the-simple-truth-about-the-gender-pay-gap/

 

 

 

Comments

The interesting title to this text entices readers to continue reading as the reader expects to be given both points of views towards the issue. While it is interesting to realize the wage gap between men and women, as well as stating the fact that it depends on the job itself, it is important to realize that there is an issue with pay equity. Pay equity laws require that female orientated and male orientated jobs that require the same amount of skill receive the same pay, which is not the case in many situations. The goal of this is to stop discrimination against common “female” jobs. The Ontario pay equity act would be interesting for you to review to have a better understanding of what laws are in place in order for this to be achieved. https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/90p07
What is brought up in this article can be considered a glass ceiling, where a female has a barrier due to motherhood. I agree with the mothers perspective that women should not be penalized because of a naturally occurring thing. While it is important to incorporate the point of view of the employer, it is also worth realizing that these women have families who function based on the salaries given to them by there employers. I strongly disagree with the idea to create a document in which a woman would have to sign stating that she would not have children. If anything, this is illegal. Women should be given the right to have children without having to pay the consequences of a glass ceiling. Especially since this is a naturally occurring thing.

This article makes the valid point that the gender wage gap exists. It presents an interesting statistic: women earn, on average, 80% of the salary that men earn for the same jobs and qualifications in the United States. It explains the existence of the gender wage gap clearly; the author gives a solid example of this phenomenon (80 000$ earned by a woman compared to 100 000$ earned by a man). However, the article suggests that the wage gap can be positive in certain ways. This is not entirely true. Men and women are created equal; there is no reason for men to be paid more than women if they have the same qualifications for the same jobs. Furthermore, the wage gap leads to the “feminization of poverty”, a significant increase in dependence on social programs, and a decrease in general economic prosperity. Also, although the article presents both sides to unpaid maternity leave, it concludes by alluding that maternity leave is something that should not be paid. This is unfair to women as bearing children is natural and needed for the perpetuation of the human race. Moreover, women depend on their salaries to handle the increase in financial needs that comes with having children. The United States is the only developed country in the world that does not guarantee paid maternity leave. Finally, Pay Equity Laws can be considered as a step in the right direction to close the wage gap. These laws ensure that all jobs that are similar have similar salaries. This is done in an effort to keep male oriented jobs and female oriented jobs equal. Attached is a link to learn more about pay equity laws in Canada: http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/jobs/workplace/human_rights/pay_equity/intro.page

Works Cited
http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/eco-bce/WI-DQF/pdf/en/The...

This is an interesting post.I love how you use your statistics to help you with your argument. The wage gap is a common problem in many countries and it does not seem to change with the years.The fact that you looked at the United states, one of the most talked about countries in the news in the last few weeks because of the election is a good.Although you used only the statistics for the whole country you still provided a chart of some states to give an overall view in comparison to the average wage gape, which helps to understand the variability of the wage gap. You also mentioned the factors that influence the wage gap ,which is essential if someone wants to understand the wage gap fully.

After that, you start explaining the two different ways of seeing pregnancy of a woman. The first way is the point of view of the mother and you explain it really good but I think you are unconsciously making reference to the Mommy track. To finish with your possible solution seems to be hard for a woman to take it seriously don't you think ? But to conclude, the wage gap is surely created by something and one the things could be pregnancy but did you checked out the glass ceiling ? The glass ceiling could very much affect the way women are paid in the society.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mommy_track
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_ceiling

The wage gap is a pressing issue that women are facing in the workplace. Your post really drew me in as I anticipated that you would look at both aspects of the problem. You efficiently described the conflict from an employers point of view but I feel as though you left out how this affects women and families across the world. If women are equally as qualified as men for a position then there should be no discrepancies between their wages and I feel as though there is no way to argue that. Also, women (and their spouses by association) should not have to choose between having a family and keeping a job. It is expensive raising a child, and if there is no paid maternity/paternity leave, then in many cases people would not be able to afford the time off. You brought to light a very controversial topic that society and industry should be working together to resolve.

The wage gap is a pressing issue that women are facing in the workplace. Your post really drew me in as I anticipated that you would look at both aspects of the problem. You efficiently described the conflict from an employers point of view but I feel as though you left out how this affects women and families across the world. If women are equally as qualified as men for a position then there should be no discrepancies between their wages and I feel as though there is no way to argue that. Also, women (and their spouses by association) should not have to choose between having a family and keeping a job. It is expensive raising a child, and if there is no paid maternity/paternity leave, then in many cases people would not be able to afford the time off. You brought to light a very controversial topic that society and industry should be working together to resolve.

The chart you used shows us that the wage gap is well and alive and your post does a great job in focusing on both sides; the employers and the employees. However, this post argues that the wage gap has positive aspects, but most people would not agree. Firstly, when looking at the wage gap, it is clear people of colour and women are the most penalized. When adding intersectionality to the mix, the consequences become even more severe, women of colour, minorities and women in general are all affected. They are blocked by the glass ceiling, a barrier that stops minorities from climbing the corporate ladder. Even people that have committed themselves to being working parents still suffer from the wage gap. So then, the wage gap reformulates itself, because it is no longer the issue of women wanting to be at home with their children. Women who have made the decision to be working mothers are still questioned and refused higher positions. Most employers become concerned about the mommy track, where they question their employees about their competing loyalties. What employers fail to realize is that it's not their choice to make, once an employee makes the decision to commit to work and have a family, they should no longer be blocked by the glass ceiling. In addition, the solution you proposed is still in disfavour of women, since there are much more women who will be forced to take unpaid parental leave compared to men since in the society we live in, women are the ones who are more likely to stay at home with children. Lots of other solutions are possible, some include more flexible hours, better paternity and maternity leaves and cheaper and more accessible childcare institutions. Here is a video by John Oliver that I really enjoyed and helped me better understand the wage gap;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsB1e-1BB4Y

This is a very intriguing post. You bring up many facts on how wage gap still exists and how you use your stats to prove your arguments. I appreciate how your picture shows and compares different wage gaps in different regions of the world. It helps the audience comprehend your stats better. Despite that, you seem to take wage gap positively in certain ways. Men and women aren’t born into this world to be treated any different from one another. They have equal rights, and equal rights meaning equal pay. Their pregnancy shouldn’t affect their pay rights. The fact on how you say women should sign agreements on how their pregnancy shouldn’t be allowed a paid leave is absurd. It isn’t quite simple to make a women sign such agreements. You also explain the two different ways of seeing the pregnancy of a woman. Your first point of view is one a mother, where you explain well and also make reference to the Mommy Track. Wouldn’t you think a Glass ceiling would also be a major cause in the wage gab?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_ceiling

Hi Emule,
I liked how you clearly laid out the wage gap issue. It was easy to understand and had facts to support it. You even mentioned some potential variables to the wage gap issue such as race, occupation and education.
It would be great if you expand and further research into some of the positive/negative effects of the wage gap. From doing some research on the topic, I found that women earning less but have children and are single/divorced/widowed are likely to fall into poverty and have less to save for retirement (http://www.canadianwomen.org/facts-about-the-gender-wage-gap-in-canada).
Also, a question for you, why do you think the wage gap is still a thing in present times and how can they be solved? I appreciate you bringing up a different perspective on the issue, but I believe it is an issue that can't just be solved economically. It's rooted into our biases, workplace policies, and current equality issues.

All the best,
Elle

Hi there,

I like the topic you chose to write about. The wage gap is an issue faced everywhere and is most often faced by women and ethnic minorities. It seems crazy that people can truly be discriminated against because of their gender or ethnicity but unfortunately it is something that occurs in real life.

Something that the wage gap relates to is particularly the gender-bias in "male" jobs. There are many occupations that in the past were typically held by males and have continued to remain known as "male jobs", or jobs that should be worked by men.

This is an example of marginalization of women in the workforce and is something that I really do not agree with. We are attempting to change society so it has a new view of gender equality (a good way of implementing this idea is with gender neutral bathrooms that have been put in place) and so that this distinction between what a woman can and cannot do is abolished.

Thankfully, times have changed and we are more often seeing women as CEO's, firefighters, police officers, mechanics, etc.

Thank you for reminding us all of the wage gap issue. I would be interested to hear your personal thoughts/opinion on the issue!

Hi!

I am happy that you wrote about this, because it is a critical issue that is not discussed enough! However, I am a bit uncertain about your analysis. You point out that this is a real phenomenon, that does not affect all people equally, and that is true. You also correctly pointed out that payment corrections to remedy this injustice would cost money. But your focus on the States I think is a bit limiting in this case. For instance, you point out that part of the origin of the pay gap is due to child rearing, and that women should be able to engage in this "natural thing". I also agree that women should be able to hold a job and reproduce, as men have since the start of the paid economy. But I don't think that this is a natural thing that results in a wage gap. Our society, in addition to having a wage gap, has included a child care gap, where it is assumed that women will engage in unpaid work around the home to ensure that then needs of children are met. However, I think if this assumption were challenged, either by incentivizing or assuming that more men would take this role, or outsourcing early childhood care to the state, the "natural" inequality could be remedied. In other places, like Sweden, there are social and state activities to ensure that the burden of child rearing does not fall disproportionately on women, and I think their pay gap is much less. Thus, including a more global perspective in your analysis might help you get a more complete picture of the situation

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