Racism Today

by rysenior on February 11, 2016 - 10:02am

I think Black lives still face racism today. Anywhere in America, officers will be more prone to frisk and or arrest black citizens over whites. Black will be convicted more often than whites. And blacks have more of a chance of being racially profiled in work, or just walking on the street. Not a whole lot has changed since slavery, but there have been some major leaps. Civil rights was an enormous jump towards equality. Racism began to go under the radar, and Black people began to feel more equal to a white person. Black lives matter because to often black people are kept out of the news, and blacks are racially profiled when applying for jobs. Two people can apply for the same job with the same credentials, and the only difference is their skin color, and the white person has a significant chance of getting the job over the black person. As a white person I believe it will take more than just my voice to make equality as important as it should be. Once all races and people stand together, will racism end, and equality spread.

 

What stays the same and hasn’t changed for decades, is the prejudice that many white people get over blacks. Many times white people, even blacks, will find a black man in a dark hoodie much more frightening over a white person with a dark hoodie. Cops feel the same way many times, and this can make them much more prone to use deadly force when a black person either becomes violent or does something unordinary. This prejudice carries into attraction, and through media, whites are always portrayed as attractive. Giving a black and white doll to girls of almost any race, they almost always pick the white doll because it’s the “prettiest” as long as media portrays whites as their models, will people continue to view other races as less attractive.

 
- Ryan

Comments

I agree that although we have made great strides in achieving equality, as a nation, we still have a long way to go. Having grown up a privileged, white girl in Baltimore city, the riots that took place last May were a wake up call to the ever-present racial inequality. I feel as though it is easy to sometimes brush off media stories covering events of African-American mistreatment because you cannot directly feel its effect. During the riots, I was forced to face the fact that these issues are still relevant in society, and they do have a significant influence on how I live my life. Although slavery and segregation no longer exist, racial discrimination takes place in other forms. In concurrence with what you said, society has shaped white as "right" or "better" through the use of trends and media. I hope that as we progress we can offer opportunities to everyone no matter what their race.
-Erin Farrugia

Racism is definitely still an issue in America and it's a shame that it doesn't get the attention in everyday life that it deserves. Race is a big topic in the media whenever there is a police shooting or other issue, but there are people that have to put up with racism every day.
Also, you may want to go back and proofread your last paragraph. I think you were making an important point and it kinda gets lost in some grammar mistakes.

I agree that although we have made great strides in achieving equality, as a nation, we still have a long way to go. Having grown up a privileged, white girl in Baltimore city, the riots that took place last May were a wake up call to the ever-present racial inequality. I feel as though it is easy to sometimes brush off media stories covering events of African-American mistreatment because you cannot directly feel its effect. During the riots, I was forced to face the fact that these issues are still relevant in society, and they do have a significant influence on how I live my life. Although slavery and segregation no longer exist, racial discrimination takes place in other forms. In concurrence with what you said, society has shaped white as "right" or "better" through the use of trends and media. I hope that as we progress we can offer opportunities to everyone no matter what their race.
-Erin Farrugia

Ryan, this is great. I completely agree with your point about prejudice. I believe that it will never be banished from society. I say this because it is something that comes from what your family preaches to you to be. If it exists in a household or with the people that some are around most , they will be accustomed to having that prejudice nature. Its the only thing that some will know. If everyone were smart enough to see around it, the world would be much better.

_Ross J.

I think that you bring up some good and very important points. Being a black that lives in a city like Baltimore I can tell you that I confront racism more than you would think. I am a black kid who grew up in a white family (I was adopted) I went to private schools and lives in a mostly white neighborhood but I still get racially profiled with no one knowing my background. In a city like Baltimore one of the biggest problems is the way that The police portray themselves to blacks. Me personally I don't feel to comfortable around cops not even because I'm black just because I don't feel that they actually keep the right people safe and so,e like to abuse there power. It only takes one cop to shoot someone and give cops everywhere a bad name. Same goes for blacks, it only takes one black to start a riot or run from a cop and it puts blacks back into a category immediately. The media also doesn't help because like you said the media really only talks about blacks if they are actors athletes musicians or ,underestimated rapists and things like that. And when they do talk about black doctors or lawyers or business men it seems like it is surprising and rare for a black to be in that position. And I am not calling these reporters racist it's sad but thats just how the media is today regardless of race or class. But overall I think that you raise many good points and are completely right about racism in today's society. And I agree that I think that it will never really go away.

-Nik

About the author