Canada, a Leader in Deforestation

by amili on October 7, 2016 - 12:14pm

     Many Canadian citizens are unconscious of the rapid deforestation that is taking place in their own nation. Since 2000, a forested area three times the size of Germany has been degraded or completely destroyed. This plays a crucial role is regulating the climate. All the CO2 emissions from cars, trucks, ships and planes combined do not match the level of CO2 that deforestation is releasing into the atmosphere. A Greenpeace study found that half of global forest lost occurred in Canada, Russia and Brazil from deforestation. These forests are home to the remaining 65 percent of world’s forest wilderness.

     Canada is the world leader in forest lost since 2000, accounting for 21 percent of global forest loss. This is due to increases in oil sands, shale gas developments, logging and road building. Changing climate is also causing major forest fires because of rapid warmth in northern Canada. In northern Albert alone, roads, pipelines, power transmission lines and infrastructure have disrupted more than 12.5 million hectares of forest. The oil sands are expected to triple in the next decade, indicating little political concern for forest conservation.

     It takes more than ten decades for the northern forests to regrow. Humanity depends on vital resources that forests provide, such as clean water, clean air, food and wood. These services are irreplaceable. Companies need to adapt sustainability commitments to avoid sourcing such commodities. Markets need to gain support from governments and urgent action needs to be set in motion to protect forests. This includes creating more protected areas and strengthening the rights of forest communities to refuse product usage from “virgin” forests. The Forest Stewardship Council was called upon to set standards for forest management in order to protect our Canadian forests.

     It is extremely shocking to learn that Canada is a global leader in deforestation, considering the large amounts of protected areas within the nation. The constant growth of the oil industry is the largest contributor to this devastating loss. This creates a degrading environmental cycle where there is loss of plant and wildlife, loss of resources, increasing CO2 emissions and increasing global temperatures that create more forest fires.  Unfortunately, the Canadian economy is highly dependent on such industry. Without the oil sands, our market would collapse and fall into a major recession. This creates a tremendous difficulty on our government to place restricts on deforestation.

     Value is a major conflict between companies and citizens and the government. The idea of “value” plays on the differences in management goals with regards to protecting our boreal forests. Oil companies may take little consideration into account for their contribution to deforestation. Governments may want to exercise power over these practices, but find it difficult due to the economic impact. I believe that the government should have a greater influence on environmental priorities and enforce laws to ensure the protection of the forests.

     I would like to remind my fellow Canadians that although forests may be a flow resource, that is usually capable of being renewed, it is also extremely dependent on the rate of extraction. This indicates a fragile scale that can easily become unbalanced. Major action needs to be taken from that state to ensure this does not occur. The first form of protection comes from restricting resource usage. Laws can then be created to ensure resource quality and sustainability. Lastly, the Canadian government can set environmental goals to protect our forests from “outside” users. Deforestation is a critical issue that faces much of the global society. Humanity cannot and will not exist without trees.

 

Reference

Leahy, Stephan. “World’s Last Remaining Forest Wilderness at Risk.” Environment.   Inter Press Service News Agency. N.p., 05 Sept. 2014, 1st ed.: n.pag. Website. 03 Oct. 2016.

Mitchell, Bruce. Resource and Environmental Management in Canada. 5th ed. Don Mills, Ontario: Oxford University Press, 2015. Textbook.

Comments

This podcast was written by Brianna Fedele. She was unable to post due to technical difficulties.

3-5 Minute Radio Script on Deforestation:

SPEAKER (UPBEAT) - Good morning, afternoon, and evening to those of you who are listening today on 103.3 with Bri! (PAUSE)

SFX- CHEESY INTRO MUSIC

SPEAKER- Now today, I’m going to be talking about an urgent environmental issue that doesn’t receive enough attention from us people. (SLIGHT PAUSE) Can anyone guess which issue that is? (PAUSE)

SFX- CLOCK TICKING

SPEAKER- Well ladies and gentlemen, I’m talking about deforestation.

SFX- CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT NOISES, TREES FALLING OVER

SPEAKER- I wanted to make today’s talk about deforestation because this alarming matter jeopardizes people’s livelihoods, threatens species, and on top of that, intensifies global warming. (PAUSE) Now I know some of you listening in on this may be thinking “how or why does this affect us humans?” (SLIGHT PAUSE) Well for the next few minutes, I’m going to fill all of you in on the causes, effects, and relevance of deforestation. (PAUSE)
SPEAKER (EXAGGERATED) – From temperate rainforests to tropical rainforests, deforestation is responsible for cutting down 900 million trees per year! (SLIGHT PAUSE) That equates to about 2.47 million trees cut down every day! (PAUSE)

SFX- LADY GASPS, HORROR MUSIC

SPEAKER- The leading causes of deforestation are cattle ranching, small and large-scale agriculture, logging, and urban development. (PAUSE) Surprisingly enough, this leaves only 3 trillion trees on Earth today, which is about 422 trees per person. (PAUSE) With the trade of extraction it is estimated that within 300 years, we will no longer have trees if we don’t change our current rate! (PAUSE) The biggest victim of deforestation is the Amazon Rainforest.

SFX- RAINFOREST AMBIENCE SOUND BEGINS TO PLAY IN BACKGROUND

SPEAKER- Around 17% on the Amazon Rainforest has been lost in the last 50 years due to deforestation. (SLIGHT PAUSE) The sad truth is that the Brazilian Amazon is responsible for holding 1/3 of the remaining rainforests on the planet! (PAUSE) Deforestation in the Amazon is a highly publicized issue because it is home to much of

the world’s biodiversity. (SLIGHT PAUSE) In fact, Brazil is considered to have the greatest biodiversity of any country on the planet. (PAUSE)

SFX- RAINFOREST AMBIENCE SOUND STILL PLAYING, ANIMAL NOISES

SPEAKER- So why is the Amazon Rainforest important? (SLIGHT PAUSE) It sustains a vide diversity of animals within the ecosystem. It is shocking but understandable, that the rate of extinction is about 137 species daily. (SLIGHT PAUSE)
The trees also play an important role in a balanced water cycle, (SLIGHT PAUSE) they provide shade, absorb rainfall and most importantly, replenish the atmosphere with oxygen. (PAUSE) By taking trees away, there is less of an opportunity for our surrounding environments to adapt. (PAUSE)
So how does this affect us? (SLIGHT PAUSE) Well, deforestation accounts for about 15% of all greenhouse gas emissions. (SLIGHT PAUSE) According to Alexia Miljus, a biology major at Guelph University, found that the emissions released by the process of deforestation emits toxins, like carbon, into our atmosphere. These particles then trap solar radiation which leads us to global warming. (PAUSE)
This issue affects humans in more ways than we know... (PAUSE) 1.6 billion people rely on benefits forests offer, including food, fresh water, clothing, traditional medicine and shelter. (PAUSE)

SPEAKER (ENGAGING) - So the next big question is... What can we do to help reduce the rate of deforestation? (SLIGHT PAUSE) For starters, we can start to be more aware and cautious about our every day purchases. In addition, even where we live, work and source our food can affect the surface area of trees. At times like this, it pays to be eco-friendly! (SLIGHT PAUSE) Even many organizations have taken initiative and enacted measures to offer alternatives or place blockades on these destructive activities. (SLIGHT PAUSE) For example the World Wide Fund for Nature, or WWF, began the Global Forest and Trade Network, linking actors who are committed to forest certification, combating illegal logging, reforming trade and protection forest areas. (PAUSE) Deforestation has become a prominent issue in the world today and it’s about time we recognize the importance of our trees, species and even human race. (PAUSE)

SFX- CHEESY OUTRO MUSIC BEGINS

SPEAKER- Unfortunately, it’s about that time where I have to wrap this segment up... I hope I taught all of you a little something today about deforestation and encouraged you to help reduce this alarming issue. Thanks for listening in on 103.3 with Bri and stay tuned for tomorrow’s radio talk at 8 am! Stay classy Rochester.

SFX- CHEESY OUTRO MUSIC FADES OUT

This podcast was written by Brianna Fedele. She was unable to post due to technical difficulties.

3-5 Minute Radio Script on Deforestation:

SPEAKER (UPBEAT) - Good morning, afternoon, and evening to those of you who are listening today on 103.3 with Bri! (PAUSE)

SFX- CHEESY INTRO MUSIC

SPEAKER- Now today, I’m going to be talking about an urgent environmental issue that doesn’t receive enough attention from us people. (SLIGHT PAUSE) Can anyone guess which issue that is? (PAUSE)

SFX- CLOCK TICKING

SPEAKER- Well ladies and gentlemen, I’m talking about deforestation.

SFX- CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT NOISES, TREES FALLING OVER

SPEAKER- I wanted to make today’s talk about deforestation because this alarming matter jeopardizes people’s livelihoods, threatens species, and on top of that, intensifies global warming. (PAUSE) Now I know some of you listening in on this may be thinking “how or why does this affect us humans?” (SLIGHT PAUSE) Well for the next few minutes, I’m going to fill all of you in on the causes, effects, and relevance of deforestation. (PAUSE)
SPEAKER (EXAGGERATED) – From temperate rainforests to tropical rainforests, deforestation is responsible for cutting down 900 million trees per year! (SLIGHT PAUSE) That equates to about 2.47 million trees cut down every day! (PAUSE)

SFX- LADY GASPS, HORROR MUSIC

SPEAKER- The leading causes of deforestation are cattle ranching, small and large-scale agriculture, logging, and urban development. (PAUSE) Surprisingly enough, this leaves only 3 trillion trees on Earth today, which is about 422 trees per person. (PAUSE) With the trade of extraction it is estimated that within 300 years, we will no longer have trees if we don’t change our current rate! (PAUSE) The biggest victim of deforestation is the Amazon Rainforest.

SFX- RAINFOREST AMBIENCE SOUND BEGINS TO PLAY IN BACKGROUND

SPEAKER- Around 17% on the Amazon Rainforest has been lost in the last 50 years due to deforestation. (SLIGHT PAUSE) The sad truth is that the Brazilian Amazon is responsible for holding 1/3 of the remaining rainforests on the planet! (PAUSE) Deforestation in the Amazon is a highly publicized issue because it is home to much of

the world’s biodiversity. (SLIGHT PAUSE) In fact, Brazil is considered to have the greatest biodiversity of any country on the planet. (PAUSE)

SFX- RAINFOREST AMBIENCE SOUND STILL PLAYING, ANIMAL NOISES

SPEAKER- So why is the Amazon Rainforest important? (SLIGHT PAUSE) It sustains a vide diversity of animals within the ecosystem. It is shocking but understandable, that the rate of extinction is about 137 species daily. (SLIGHT PAUSE)
The trees also play an important role in a balanced water cycle, (SLIGHT PAUSE) they provide shade, absorb rainfall and most importantly, replenish the atmosphere with oxygen. (PAUSE) By taking trees away, there is less of an opportunity for our surrounding environments to adapt. (PAUSE)
So how does this affect us? (SLIGHT PAUSE) Well, deforestation accounts for about 15% of all greenhouse gas emissions. (SLIGHT PAUSE) According to Alexia Miljus, a biology major at Guelph University, found that the emissions released by the process of deforestation emits toxins, like carbon, into our atmosphere. These particles then trap solar radiation which leads us to global warming. (PAUSE)
This issue affects humans in more ways than we know... (PAUSE) 1.6 billion people rely on benefits forests offer, including food, fresh water, clothing, traditional medicine and shelter. (PAUSE)

SPEAKER (ENGAGING) - So the next big question is... What can we do to help reduce the rate of deforestation? (SLIGHT PAUSE) For starters, we can start to be more aware and cautious about our every day purchases. In addition, even where we live, work and source our food can affect the surface area of trees. At times like this, it pays to be eco-friendly! (SLIGHT PAUSE) Even many organizations have taken initiative and enacted measures to offer alternatives or place blockades on these destructive activities. (SLIGHT PAUSE) For example the World Wide Fund for Nature, or WWF, began the Global Forest and Trade Network, linking actors who are committed to forest certification, combating illegal logging, reforming trade and protection forest areas. (PAUSE) Deforestation has become a prominent issue in the world today and it’s about time we recognize the importance of our trees, species and even human race. (PAUSE)

SFX- CHEESY OUTRO MUSIC BEGINS

SPEAKER- Unfortunately, it’s about that time where I have to wrap this segment up... I hope I taught all of you a little something today about deforestation and encouraged you to help reduce this alarming issue. Thanks for listening in on 103.3 with Bri and stay tuned for tomorrow’s radio talk at 8 am! Stay classy Rochester.

SFX- CHEESY OUTRO MUSIC FADES OUT

First I would like to comment on the extra effects you chose to add in the script. Even though this is not in the form of a formal podcast, I felt that it drew attention to the topic of discussion and gave off the same effect as if it were an actually radio discussion. You opened the form of this urgent environmental issue to “us”. I feel as if this is vague. Who is “us”? What audience are you trying to reach? If I were to be flicking through radio channels, what category of people are you trying to speak to? Canadians in general, governments or a global population? Personally, I take environmental issues into greater account when it is close to home or a resource that I have personally contributed to the degradation of.

I appreciate your usage of stress that you place on this issue. I like how you opened with some damaging effects of deforestation. You also included some shocking figures of 900 millions trees being cut down, which relates to there only being approximately 422 trees per person. This brings a very real perspective to daily occurrences on the planet. Still, I am unsure of who you are addressing. Although you make great points, I think it would be better to “get the point across” if you directed it to certain people who are directly affecting the forest, or a particular country. Possibly including a definition of the term “deforestation” could help the general public to grasp the concept.

I see that you used the Amazon Rainforest as an example about half way into your podcast. I agree that the Amazon is under tremendous stress, but the same can be said for Canada’s Boreal Forests as well. To which extent each forest is under human stresses, I am unsure. What I do know is that the Amazon tends to be under more of a public eye due to its high variability in species of plants and wildlife. This means that there may be a blind eye turned to other forests that are in a critical state. Possibly a lack of research in other forests is causing such a little understanding and uncertainty.

I like how you included the benefits that trees provide humans, such as providing shade and absorbing carbon dioxide as you mentioned. Forests also provide material goods, like clothing, medicine, etc. I appreciate your reference to myself and my previous blog post on deforestation in Canada. I am currently in Geography at the University of Guelph, which has provided me with such knowledge on the topic. I am greatly concerned about the rates of deforestation occurring all over the world. You have just informed confirmed and in fact provided me with more information with regards to severe this environmental issue actually is.

I enjoyed your considerations of every day actions and how this effects our environment near the end of your podcast. I think this is a good way to end the discussion and get the public thinking of their personal contributions to deforestation. Overall I thought your podcast was very informative, creative and interesting. Hope some of my critiques and responses helped you gain a different perspective and possibly a better understanding!