African-Americans Killed By Supremacist Criminal Justice System

by TheMindUnleashed on September 10, 2015 - 5:07pm

African-Americans Killed By Supremacist Criminal Justice System

            On the 2nd of July 2014, it had been 50 years since the Civil Rights Act was effective in the U.S., which “outlawed segregation in public facilities and racial discrimination in employment and education”, according to the history.com website (2). The known figure, Martin Luther King Jr. had worked for years to overcome the supremacy of the white Americans who promoted prejudice to the African-American populations. However, even if it has been 51 years now, prejudice is still deadly and recurrent in the U.S. criminal justice system. The International Humanist & Ethical Union (IHEU) had much to say about the subject.

            Indeed, humanist Elizabeth O’Casey of the IHEU raised concerns of “police brutality, lax gun controls and racial injustice in the United States” during a “discussion on racism at the UN Human Rights Council” (1). In July of 2015, she argued with the US Ambassador to incite the government to review the situation and take measures to change it. She came forth with statistics that showed the devastating situation. “On average”, she states, “black youths are shot dead by white police officers almost twice a week” (1). The dreadful cases present the on-going racism in the criminal justice system, as the white police officers use their power and rights as a workforce to impose their supremacy onto minorities, even though these are innocent. On top of that, O’Casey notes that “incarceration rates tell a similar story of deep-rooted racial inequality and discrimination” (1). In the big picture, white policemen seem to be putting a lot of effort to keep African-Americans of the streets and the IHEU is strongly against it. But why does a society, that legally promotes liberty and justice for ALL its citizens, still show clear signs of racism in the criminal justice system?

          It has been shown in “The Humanist Tradition” course that actions are set forth from a person’s beliefs and values. Therefore, the prejudice of the African-Americans is mainly due to some of the members of the criminal justice system’s unjust worldview of inequality towards men of dark skin color. This is especially true in the states whose history is bloodily spotted by racial violence. In fact, since “actions speak louder than words”, the many recent cases of fatal shootings of African-Americans such as Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Trayvon Martin, (to only name a few) show a clear picture that racism is still very present in the oppressive mindset of policemen, as they clearly violate the African-Americans’ rights. It is unacceptable that policemen, who are supposed to be models of the country’s official position on equality, do not convey it and permit themselves to cause harm to other people on the mere reason that they have a different skin color. Also, in most cases of police brutality that involve fatal shootings, the murderers do not even face any charges, as they find ways to be protected under the law. This says a lot about the changes that still needs to be done. Hence, the IHEU states that the government needs to take the “institutionalised racism in its criminal justice system” “far more seriously” (1).

            Finally, this subject is of great importance, since white supremacy still poses a threat to the lives of African-Americans. Furthermore, more rigid laws need to be put into place to target and punish racial injustices and crimes against minorities, even if the prosecutors are policemen themselves. After all, the Civil Rights Act was signed 51 years ago, yet the situation is still horrible. Change needs to be done.

 

Citations

O'Casey, Elizabeth. "Police Brutality and Racism in American Criminal Justice System Highlighted by IHEU." IHEU. 2 July 2015. Web. 9 Sept. 2015.

"Civil Rights Act." History.com. A&E Television Networks. Web. 9 Sept. 2015.

"Why Do US Police Keep Killing Unarmed Black Men? - BBC News." BBC News. BBC News, 26 May 2015. Web. 9 Sept. 2015.