Access to University should be a right not a privilege

by Juliana2 on November 23, 2015 - 10:09pm

 

Access to University should be a right not a privilege

 

Education is something that is obligatory until the age of 16 in certain part of the world. Pass this age, the choice comes back the youngster to decide wether or not he wants to continue in the path that is education or take another road. However it is essential for a majority of our population to continue their studies.

 

A well-educated nation can do great things and become a beautiful civilization. But how can we arrive to this if our access to education is restrained. If our access to education is limited to what our wallet can afford. According to me, it is not the little percentage of rich people that can make our country a great nation. Every brain has to be put to the test and contribute in our society.

 

Access to university : right or privilege? Right of course! Many people do not have the money to pay high priced education. According to study made by Statistique Canada, during the rise of the cost of education in 1990 the rate of participation in universities had dropped in the customers that came from a family that earned $75 000 and less per year (Statistique Canada). Lets not imagine what would happen if the acces to university was privileged. Why deny something fundamental for a society to a part of its population.

 

According to the Amsterdam declaration, humanism supports democracy and human rights. It is a human right for every person on earth to have an equal access to university and to education in general. “Humanism aims at the fullest possible development of every human being” (Amsterdam Declaration 2002) how can us human grow, become better if a part of our population does not have the opportunities as the others. We are lucky to live in a country were most of us can go school. Unfortunately many countries do not have the same chance as us and struggle to get their population educated. Only rich people can have a good education because of their abilities to buy books, pay school fees and more. During the spring of 2012 in Quebec, we witnessed a “rebellion” with the students strike against the raise of university fees. They showed the rest of the world how to stand up for what is right and not be intimated by the power of politics and economy. This is what fighting for human rights means, fighting for equality. Not only between the sexes but between humans in general.

 

 

 

 CLASSE. “Impact généraux de cette hausse”. bloquonslahausse.com. Np. Nd. Web. 23 Nov. 2015

International humanist and ethical union. “The Amsterdam Declaration”. International humanist and ethical union. Np. 2002. Web. 23 Nov. 2015

Comments

I really like your point about how mass education can lead to a more prosperous society. Access to education should certainly be regarded as a fundamental right that the government is obligated to provide. What if the equation was flipped, with education understood as a citizens obligation to the state? In other words, imagine a world where it is the individual's duty to become educated and capable of critical thought to solve social problems, or vote in the best politicians? In this view, receiving an education is not only a human right, but an moral, honourable quality – or a virtue. Furthermore, by aligning access to education with the ethical school of thought known as ‘Virtue Ethics’, moral weight is added to the fight for widespread access to education.

Noam Chomsky, a prominent anti-war activist of the 20th century, suggested that being educated is a virtue when he famously published an essay that addressed “The Responsibility of Intellectuals” in creating a just and peaceful society. Chomsky’s argument is underpinned by the virtue ethics approach, where an individual's moral character should be at the forefront of their intellectual pursuits. According to virtue ethical theory, the contributions made to society as a result of ones education should motivate that individual to become educated. Essentially, attaining knowledge constitutes virtuous behaviour and contributes to an individual's moral character. Gandhi also advocated that to be educated is to be virtuous when he said that a danger to human virtue is “Knowledge without character”.

I love the quote that “Humanism aims at the fullest possible development of every human being” (Amsterdam Declaration 2002). Similarly, every human being should aim at the fullest possible achievement of humanism for the sake of a enriching society at large.

I really like your point about how mass education can lead to a more prosperous society. Access to education should certainly be regarded as a fundamental right that the government is obligated to provide. What if the equation was flipped, with education understood as a citizens obligation to the state? In other words, imagine a world where it is the individual's duty to become educated and capable of critical thought to solve social problems, or vote in the best politicians? In this view, receiving an education is not only a human right, but an moral, honourable quality – or a virtue. Furthermore, by aligning access to education with the ethical school of thought known as ‘Virtue Ethics’, moral weight is added to the fight for widespread access to education.

Noam Chomsky, a prominent anti-war activist of the 20th century, suggested that being educated is a virtue when he famously published an essay that addressed “The Responsibility of Intellectuals” in creating a just and peaceful society. Chomsky’s argument is underpinned by the virtue ethics approach, where an individual's moral character should be at the forefront of their intellectual pursuits. According to virtue ethical theory, the contributions made to society as a result of ones education should motivate that individual to become educated. Essentially, attaining knowledge constitutes virtuous behaviour and contributes to an individual's moral character. Gandhi also advocated that to be educated is to be virtuous when he said that a danger to human virtue is “Knowledge without character”.

I love the quote that “Humanism aims at the fullest possible development of every human being” (Amsterdam Declaration 2002). Similarly, every human being should aim at the fullest possible achievement of humanism for the sake of a enriching society at large.

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