You Are Enough - What the Media Doesn't Understand

by lost--galaxies on February 14, 2016 - 11:10pm

Over the past few decades, the media industry has grown and become more influential than it has ever been in the past. Society has developed a tendency to fall into the trap that is this overly capable industry and has therefore, encouraged a false perception of society as we know it.  In the advertisement presented above, produced by Warner’s Slimwear Lingerie, puts on display a pear that can be described as “curvy” or “rounder”. The slogan in white font that we find written over the pear states “This is no shape for a girl”, followed by a description of their product at the bottom, that starts off by the sentence, “Girls with too much bottom and too little top: Warner’s can reshape you”, which clearly has the sole purpose of enticing women, and girls, to constantly find a way to make themselves slimmer. This ad, and the way it is presented that can be perceived as sexist in various ways. Not only does the company judge women’s appearances and sets a certain standard that they personally  think is best, but they also encourage the female sex to see themselves differently. They then continue to put an emphasis on how curvier women, with a rounder bottom need reshaping and that their company is the “way to go”.

 

     When we hear the words “feminine” or “women”, most of us have the same constructed image in our heads of what those words such represent. Close your eyes for a few seconds, and think about it. Blond hair, long-legged, athletic looking, curvy but not big? Is that what you see? Yeah, I thought so. Just as Anthony Cortese states in one of his famous articles, “Internalizing cultural standards of feminine beauty leads to increased shame and anxiety about the body and appearance, partly because societal images of idyllic beauty are virtually impossible to achieve.” (Cortese, 61). Some may say that our society has greatly advanced and that we find ourselves in a world where women tend to have a lot more freedom and are able to accept themselves just as they are. But if you close your eyes for a second, especially as a girl, you will constantly find something to fix, to make better about yourself. Few are those that are completely satisfied with themselves. 

 

     I have learned in the mere 17 years that make up my young existence, that it is not society that is at fault, but each and every individual, as we give value to other people’s values and opinions and allow them to change our own. YOU ARE ENOUGH, whether you are blond, brunette, tall, short, fair-skinned, dark-skinned, curvier, very skinny. Remember you are enough. Remember it is time to stop doubting yourself and start believing in yourself, because no one can do that for you.

 

Works Cited

Vagianos, Alana. 11 Sexist Vintage Ads That Will Have Your Head Spinning. The Huffington Post, 24 Jan. 2014. Web. 12 Feb. 2016.

Cortese, Anthony. “Constructed Bodies, Deconstructing Ads: Sexism in Advertising.” Provocateur: Images of Women and Minorities in Advertising, Third Edition 2008: 57-89. Print.

 

 

 

Comments

Good article. At first I thought the pear image was an anti-sexist ad saying there should be no defined standard telling us what a girl should look like, but after you explained it is in fact very sexist. These ads are really horrible because they try to aim right at people’s weakest insecurities and try to give them an expensive way out for their own profit. The problem is that the overload of ads create the insecurities and a really bad vicious circle. I love the last paragraph where you bring it back on an individual level and explain that the change needs to happen on a personal basis before anything big can happen. I agree completely with this as there is no way the people making money on this will stop because of their “concern” about the well-being of others. Humans care about money more than that. If we can really make a change, it would be by raising awareness with young people and the new generation through our educational system. If people were a bit more objective and didn’t get influenced so easily we would not be having these discussions.

Good article. At first I thought the pear image was an anti-sexist ad saying there should be no defined standard telling us what a girl should look like, but after you explained it is in fact very sexist. These ads are really horrible because they try to aim right at people’s weakest insecurities and try to give them an expensive way out for their own profit. The problem is that the overload of ads create the insecurities and a really bad vicious circle. I love the last paragraph where you bring it back on an individual level and explain that the change needs to happen on a personal basis before anything big can happen. I agree completely with this as there is no way the people making money on this will stop because of their “concern” about the well-being of others. Humans care about money more than that. If we can really make a change, it would be by raising awareness with young people and the new generation through our educational system. If people were a bit more objective and didn’t get influenced so easily we would not be having these discussions.